Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

Local Host(s): 
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2:03am

Fri June 15, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

Tracing The Trail Of Musical Fathers

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:56 am

Fathers have played an important role in shaping musical history.
Matthew Scherf iStockphoto.com

With Father's Day coming up this weekend, Morning Edition music commentator Miles Hoffman has been thinking about a few musical dads and their children.

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2:10pm

Thu June 14, 2012
The Upstate Economy

Can two Ithaca lawyers keep fracking out of New York state?

Helen and David Slottje moved to Ithaca in 1999. During the next ten years, they slowly transformed from corporate lawyers to the driving force behind New York's local drilling bans.
Matt Richmond/Innovation Trail

The fate of hydraulic fracturing in New York is still being determined by state regulators.

But that doesn’t mean municipalities aren’t taking action.

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10:49am

Thu June 14, 2012
Environment

Lake Ontario lawmakers ask Cuomo to halt IJC water levels plan

State lawmakers representing communities along the south shore of Lake Ontario are lining up against a plan to regulate water levels in the lake, and in the St. Lawrence River system.

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10:19am

Thu June 14, 2012
Politics and Government

State Senate forum questions status of big business advocacy group

A hearing by New York Senate Democrats explored the influence of the controversial lobby group known as ALEC in New York State. Those who testified say more light needs to shine on the secretive group and even urged the state ethics commission to start an investigation.

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9:59am

Thu June 14, 2012
Health

Central New York counties take new steps to prevent EEE

Several New York counties are taking new steps to stop the Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus.

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9:36am

Thu June 14, 2012
Environment

Onondaga Lake dredging stirs up controversy with Onondaga Nation

Dredging equipment on Onondaga Lake
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The Onondaga Nation is not happy with the breadth of the Honeywell Corporation's plan to dredge and cap polluted sediment at the bottom of Onondaga Lake.

This $451 million plan will dredge an estimated two million cubic yards of toxic material from 185 acres out of the 3,000-acre lake bottom, and cap 14-percent of the lake bottom, to keep toxic chemicals underground.

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7:07am

Thu June 14, 2012
Strange News

Study: Shoes Tell A Lot About A Person

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. They say to understand a man, walk a mile in his shoes. Research from the University of Kansas suggests you don't even need to do that. The new study found judgments based on simply looking at someone's shoes, were right 90 percent of the time.

Shoes can reveal age, income, emotional state and political preference. Liberals really do wear shabby shoes and extroverts, flashy ones. Oddly, those in uncomfortable shoes tended to be calm.

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7:07am

Thu June 14, 2012
Strange News

Gym Manager Booby-Traps Locker To Catch Thief

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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5:06am

Thu June 14, 2012
Law

Michigan Finally Eyeing Changes To Lawyers For Poor

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 12:05 pm

Edward Carter's conviction for a 1974 crime was vacated by a judge after it was shown that Carter was innocent — and after he had spent 35 years in Michigan prisons.
Brakkton Booker NPR

Lawyers on all sides agree the system enshrined nearly 50 years ago that gives all defendants the right to a lawyer is not working. The Justice Department calls it a crisis — such a big problem that it's been doling out grants to improve how its adversaries perform in criminal cases.

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5:05am

Thu June 14, 2012
Middle East

Iran's Nuclear Fatwa: A Policy Or A Ploy?

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 8:25 pm

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad delivers a speech under a portrait of Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on June 2. The supreme leader has said repeatedly that nuclear weapons are un-Islamic and Iran will not pursue them. But in the West, many are skeptical.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

It's been an article of faith for nearly a decade that Iran's supreme leader issued a fatwa — a religious edict — that nuclear weapons are a sin and Iran has no intention of acquiring them.

President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently made references to this religious commitment from Iran's leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

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5:05am

Thu June 14, 2012
Sports

A Minor Leaguer's Life: Bats, Games And A Nickname

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 11:51 am

Tyler Saladino, 22, makes a throw from second base during warm-ups with the AA Birmingham Barons.
Russell Lewis NPR

Tyler Saladino plays baseball in the minor leagues in Birmingham, Ala. A prospect in the Chicago White Sox system, he was sent to the AA Birmingham Barons after spending part of spring training with the major league club.

And when he arrived in Alabama, Saladino's first task was to find a place to live, as he tells Morning Edition's David Greene. He settled on sharing an apartment.

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4:30am

Thu June 14, 2012
Crisis In The Housing Market

Will Credit Be The Spoiler In Housing Recovery?

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 11:04 am

The housing market is finally showing signs of a comeback, according to an annual study from Harvard. But, though mortgage interest rates are at record lows, banks are often too cautious to lend.
Seth Perlman AP

Amid all the economic uncertainty over the credit crisis in Europe and slow job growth in the U.S., one sector may be looking up. The U.S. housing market is finally showing more signs of recovery, according to a report being released Thursday by Harvard University.

Harvard comes out with this study once a year, and this time around, it's painting a much brighter picture.

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2:48am

Thu June 14, 2012
The Record

My American Dream Sounds Like Prince

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 3:00 pm

Prince performing at the Fabulous Forum in Inglewood, Calif., in 1985.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

I was born in 1970, sprung from one of the most aspirational generations America has ever produced: The Hip-Hop Nation. With decades of rap music anthems dedicated to our fantastical transition from poverty to prosperity, we rarely celebrate our wealth without looking back on our meager beginnings. The American Dream, for us, always represents the possibility of success and affluence on our own terms — with a watchful eye toward our hardscrabble origins.

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9:00am

Wed June 13, 2012
Regional Coverage

GOP primary possibilities

The only statewide race in the upcoming June 26 federal primary in New York state, is the contest to see who will take on U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand in  the November election.  But even the state's top republican doesn't offer any clues who's going to win.

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6:40am

Wed June 13, 2012
Strange News

Bacon Tops New Burger King Dessert

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 7:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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6:35am

Wed June 13, 2012
Strange News

Director Boyle Unveils Pastoral Olympics Opener

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 7:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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5:21am

Wed June 13, 2012
London 2012: The Summer Olympics

Fencing's Father-Son Duo Hones An Olympic Dream

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 8:17 pm

Alexander Massialas (left) lands a touch on Britain's Keith Cook during last year's Fencing International Invitation in London.
Sang Tan AP

When they travel to London to compete in this summer's Olympics, many elite athletes will be joined by family members. But for Alexander Massialas and his father, Greg, it's different. Both of them will represent the United States — one as a coach, and the other as an athlete.

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5:12am

Wed June 13, 2012
Energy

Ruling Could Help Break The Nuclear-Waste Logjam

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 12:43 pm

About 70,000 tons of used nuclear fuel sits mostly at power plants across the country. Much is kept underwater in spent fuel pools, but utility companies have been moving the fuel into concrete and steel casks like these in Richland, Wash. Energy Northwest CEO Vic Parrish (center) tours the facility with Reps. Doc Hastings (left) and Jay Inslee.
Shannon Dininny AP

The federal government promised almost 30 years ago to find a place to bury nuclear waste from power plants. It hasn't. So the waste is piling up at power plants around the country.

Now a federal court says the government must prove that this temporary solution is truly safe. The decision could help break the nuclear-waste logjam.

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5:03am

Wed June 13, 2012
Planet Money

Spain's Bank Matchmaker On What Went Wrong

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 8:55 pm

Angel Borges, matchmaker.
Chana Joffe-Walt NPR

A couple years ago, Spain hatched a plan to help its small, regional banks. The banks, called cajas, had made lots of bad loans during Spain's real estate bubble.

The plan: Merge the bad cajas with the good ones, in order to make the losses more manageable and bring down overhead.

The government brought in Angel Borges, a banking consultant from Madrid, as a sort of yenta — a matchmaker who was supposed to help the cajas get together.

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4:41am

Wed June 13, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Traces Of Virus In Man Cured Of HIV Trigger Scientific Debate

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:35 am

Timothy Ray Brown, widely known in research circles as the Berlin patient, was cured of his HIV infection by bone marrow transplants. Now scientists are trying to make sense of the traces of HIV they've found in some cells of his body.
Richard Knox NPR

Top AIDS scientists are scratching their heads about new data from the most famous HIV patient in the world — at least to people in the AIDS community.

Timothy Ray Brown, known as the Berlin patient, is thought to be the first patient ever to be cured of HIV infection.

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4:30am

Wed June 13, 2012
Revolutionary Road Trip

In The New Libya, Lots Of Guns And Calls For Shariah

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 3:33 pm

Libyans rally in favor of Shariah law, in Benghazi, eastern Libya. The city was the birthplace of the uprising that ousted Moammar Gadhafi.
John W. Poole NPR

Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road Trip across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team are traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo. In the Libyan towns of Benghazi and Derna, he talks to Islamists about their desire to see a new Libya ruled by Shariah law.

The other day in Benghazi, Libya, we found our vehicle surrounded by truckloads of men with machine guns.

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4:29am

Wed June 13, 2012
The Salt

Farmers Split Over Subsidies As Senate Farm Bill Debate Begins

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 8:48 am

Larry Sailer on his corn and soybean farm, just north of Iowa Falls, Iowa.
Jonathan Ahl for NPR

The latest proposal for the farm bill — the law governing everything from food stamps to rural development grants — is being considered by the U.S. Senate this week. It's designed to save more than $23 billion over the next 10 years, in part by getting rid of direct payments to farmers. The direct payment program alone costs taxpayers $5 billion per year.

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12:03am

Wed June 13, 2012
The Record

Clear Channel Will Be The First To Pay Royalties For Music On Its Air

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:40 pm

Tim McGraw (left) and Scott Borchetta, CEO of Big Machine Label Group, at a press conference in Nashville last month announcing McGraw's signing to the label.
Royce DeGrie WireImage

10:03pm

Tue June 12, 2012
Sweetness And Light

The Language of Baseball: In Is Out And Foul Is Fair

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 8:14 am

Pittsburgh Pirates fans reach for a foul ball hit into the stands by Mike Moustakas of the Kansas City Royals in the seventh inning of a game in Pittsburgh.
Keith Srakocic AP

Baseball historians continue to poke around in the 19th century to better explain how the game was originated and developed, but I've always wondered if one of the prime movers wasn't a student of Shakespeare.

While I certainly don't know the terminology of all ball games, the popular ones I'm aware of — everything from basketball and football to golf and tennis — all use some variations of the words in and out when determining whether the ball is playable.

Only baseball is different.

"Fair is foul and foul is fair; Hover through the fog and filthy air."

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9:48am

Tue June 12, 2012
Regional Coverage

NY lawmakers approve electronic drug prescriptions bill

bradleypjohnson Flickr

New York state lawmakers have approved legislation requiring doctors to issue drug prescriptions electronically within three years.

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9:35am

Tue June 12, 2012
Regional Coverage

Zoo hosts Operation Salute for veterans

Veterans returning from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and their families will get a special welcome home this week at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse.   The idea is to show these vets that the community appreciates their sacrifices.

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9:25am

Tue June 12, 2012
Regional Coverage

Eight session days left, many issues unresolved

New York state lawmakers plan on leaving Albany for the summer on June 21, but they continue to be gridlocked on the issues of raising the state’s minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $8.50 an hour, and offering tax breaks to small businesses as an incentive to create more jobs.

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9:06am

Tue June 12, 2012
Planet Money

Why It's Illegal To Braid Hair Without A License

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 6:21 am

Jestina Clayton, would-be braider.
Jim Urquhart AP

Note: This post was updated to add audio from Morning Edition.

Jestina Clayton learned how to braid hair as a girl growing up in Sierra Leone. When she was 18, she moved to America. Got married, had a couple kids, went to college.

When she graduated from college, she found that the pay from an entry-level office job would barely cover the cost of child care. So she decided to work from her home in Utah and start a hair-braiding business.

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7:59am

Tue June 12, 2012
Remembrances

'Dynasty' Costume Designer Nolan Miller Dies

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Fans hooked on "Dallas" back in the '80s were probably also watching other popular prime time soaps, including "Dynasty." "Dynasty," like its rival, was about a rich oil family, this one in Colorado, and the women on "Dynasty" defined '80s fashion with their slinky blouses, gold lame, glamorous jewelry, and of course those power suits with the big shoulders.

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7:35am

Tue June 12, 2012
History

50 Years Later, Mystery Of Alcatraz Escape Endures

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 1:37 pm

Alcatraz on the 50th anniversary of the escape of inmates Frank Morris, John Anglin and Clarence Anglin.
Annie Tritt for NPR

Fifty years ago three men set out into the frigid waters of the San Francisco Bay in a raft made out of raincoats. It was one of the most daring prison escapes in U.S. history from what was billed as the nation's only "escape-proof prison" — Alcatraz.

Most people assume the men have been at the bottom of the bay or were swept out to sea since the night they broke free, tunneling out of their cells in part with spoons from the kitchen and climbing the prisons' plumbing to the roof.

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