Morning Edition

Weekdays 5am-10am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Local Host(s): 
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3:31pm

Mon October 24, 2011
Author Interviews

New Bio Quotes Jobs On God, Gates And Great Design

Ever since Steve Jobs died on Oct. 5, much has been written but little revealed about a man who was the face of an iconic American company. But now comes the official biography, published less than three weeks after the death of the Apple co-founder. Over the course of two years and 40 interviews, biographer Walter Isaacson had unique access to Jobs, right up until Jobs' death at age 56.

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8:13am

Mon October 24, 2011

7:58am

Mon October 24, 2011
Business

School Turns Trash Into Cash

A school in Flint, Mich., gathered tens of thousands of potato chip bags, juice boxes and other lunchtime trash, then sold it all to Terracycle, a company that turns the packaging into bags and placemats. The school made almost $500 dollars.

5:22am

Mon October 24, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Big-Name Drugs Are Falling Off The 'Patent Cliff'

iStockphoto.com

Some of the most popular and expensive brand-name drugs are about to go generic.

Take Lipitor, for example. In November, the heart drug comes off-patent — and by next June, there are likely to be multiple generic versions.

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7:45am

Fri October 21, 2011
History

Soccer Played As Early As The 15th Century

Historians have found documents from 1497 that show King James IV paid two shillings for a bag of "fut ballis." Seventy years later, Mary Queen of Scots watched a match. The curator of the Scottish Football Museum says the early game was for the royals but the matches did include heated arguments between players.

7:31am

Fri October 21, 2011
Research News

Biologists Solve Surfing Snails Mystery

Violet snails may be some of the best surfers around, but how the ocean snails develop their little rafts has been a mystery. Biologists have now figured out that the surfing snails ascended from evolutionary relatives on the ocean floor. The surfboard evolved from the snails' egg packet.

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

The MTV reality show The Real World posted an ad on Craigslist earlier this week seeking Occupy Wall Street protesters as cast members. The news blog "Talking Points Memo" picked up on the posting, and called the production company to confirm. An executive there said the protest is "something that's in the zeitgeist of young people."

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Africa

Arab World Reacts To Gadhafi's Death

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 7:32 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

Libyans awoke, this morning, to a new dawn, a nation no longer in the grip of a dictator. Moammar Gadhafi was killed yesterday, after being captured in his hometown of Sirte, where fierce fighting had raged for weeks between his loyalists and anti-Gadhafi forces.

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4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi May Be Dead But His Presence Lives On

For the latest from Libya, Ari Shapiro talks to Vivienne Walt, a correspondent for "Time Magazine," who's based in Tripoli.

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi's Death Caps Libya's Civil War

Ousted Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was killed on Thursday after being captured in his hometown of Sirte. His death marks a spectacular fall from power that began in February when anti-government forces seized the coastal city of Misrata.

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Europe

Europe Reacts To Gadhafi's Death

Oliver Miles, a former British Ambassador to Libya, talks to Renee Montagne about the reaction in Britain, and France to the death of former Libyan ruler Moammar Gadhafi. What does his death mean for Europe's future role in Libya?

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Animals

Zanesville Animal Tragedy Echoes 'Ridge' Plot

The events in Ohio involving the release of dozens of exotic animals eerily parallel parts of Michael Koryta's latest book: The Ridge. Koryta talks to Ari Shapiro about the challenges of regulating exotic animal ownership.

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Business

Walmart To Cut Back On Employee Healthcare

The nation's largest private employer will no longer provide a healthcare plan for new part-time employees, according to The New York Times. Walmart is also raising premiums for many full-time staff. The reason is rising costs, according to a company spokesman quoted in the story.

4:00am

Fri October 21, 2011
Europe

Eurozone Debt Crisis Divides France, Germany

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, host: And I'm Ari Shapiro filling in for Steve Inskeep.

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12:01am

Fri October 21, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Franz Liszt At 200: An Important, But Not Great, Composer

Hungarian composer and pianist Franz Liszt wrote incredibly difficult music, music that only he was capable of playing.

Hulton Archive

Tomorrow is the 200th birthday of composer and pianist Franz Liszt. Morning Edition's music commentator Miles Hoffman thinks there are plenty of reasons to celebrate.

"This is a man who lived an extraordinarily long and an extraordinarily productive life — a very complicated life," Hoffman says "By many accounts he was the greatest pianist of the 19th century, somebody who revolutionized people's ideas of what was possible on the piano."

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7:14am

Thu October 20, 2011
Around the Nation

Giant Cell Phone Bill Shocks Florida Woman

Celina Aarons' deaf brother communicates via text message. She usually pays about $175 a month for his cellphone. But when he went to Canada without an international plan, the bill was more than $200,000. A Miami TV station intervened, and now T-Mobile says Aarons only owes $2,500. She has six months to pay.

7:05am

Thu October 20, 2011
Animals

Forget The Tux, Little Blue Penguins Need Sweaters

The Little Blue Penguins off the coast of New Zealand are in trouble, and they need sweaters to save them. The birds are being rescued from a big oil spill. The sweaters keep the penguins from preening. That way they don't ingest the oil.

4:06am

Thu October 20, 2011
Sports

World Series Opener: Cards Beat Rangers 3-2

The St. Louis Cardinals won the first game of the World Series Wednesday night. On a chilly, wet evening in St. Louis, the Cards scratched out a 3-2 win over the Texas Rangers. It was a dramatic, hard-fought beginning to what promises to be a close series.

4:00am

Thu October 20, 2011
NPR Story

Romney Campaigns In Iowa

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And I'm Ari Shapiro, updating you now on a story we've been following all morning: Libya's longtime former dictator Moammar Gadhafi is dead. The country's prime minister has confirmed. Stay with MORNING EDITION for more on that story. Now, we turn to domestic news.

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4:00am

Thu October 20, 2011
NPR Story

Clinton To Meet Afghan President Karzai

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived in Afghanistan yesterday on an unannounced visit to encourage the country's leadership to keep up reconciliation efforts with the Taliban. Today she's meeting with Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

4:00am

Thu October 20, 2011
Europe

European Leaders Try To Keep Debt Crisis From Spreading

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 11:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

More demonstrations are being staged today in Greece as its parliament votes on another round of stinging austerity measures. Yesterday's protests ended in vicious street battles between police and protesters. Meanwhile, European leaders seem deadlocked on plans to stop the Greek debt crisis from spilling into the rest of the eurozone. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Athens.

And, Sylvia, how are people reacting to yesterday's turmoil and clashes over these austerity measures?

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4:00am

Thu October 20, 2011
Business

Business News

Ari Shapiro has business news.

12:01am

Thu October 20, 2011
Monkey See

Amy Poehler: Playing Politics, But Only On Television

Amy Poehler, seen here with Aubrey Plaza as April Ludgate and Chris Pratt as Andy Dwyer, plays idealistic bureaucrat Leslie Knope on NBC's Parks And Recreation.

Ron Tom NBC

Amy Poehler joined Saturday Night Live in 2001 — a time, she says, when no one was really sure comedy was going to ever be okay again. She left in 2008 after playing Hillary Clinton during the show's coverage of an election cycle when, she tells Ari Shapiro on Thursday's Morning Edition, "the country was really paying attention to politics."

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12:01am

Thu October 20, 2011
Author Interviews

Real 'Sybil' Admits Multiple Personalities Were Fake

Shirley Mason was the psychiatric patient whose life was portrayed in the 1973 book Sybil. The book and subsequent film caused an enormous spike in reported cases of multiple personality disorder. Mason later admitted she had faked her multiple personalities.

Courtesy Simon & Schuster

When Sybil first came out in 1973, not only did it shoot to the top of the best-seller lists — it manufactured a psychiatric phenomenon. The book was billed as the true story of woman who suffered from multiple personality disorder. Within a few years of its publication, reported cases of multiple personality disorder — now known as dissociative identity disorder — leapt from fewer than 100 to thousands. But in a new book, Sybil Exposed, writer Debbie Nathan argues that most of the story is based on a lie.

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6:43pm

Wed October 19, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Joseph Calleja: The Young Tenor With The Old-School Sound

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 11:48 am

Joseph Calleja's voice reminds many of the golden-age tenors of the past.

Johannes Ifkovitz Decca

Opera fanatics often trot out the tired old complaint about how "they don't make 'em like they used to" while pining for the great singers of the past. But as an unabashed opera nerd, I can tell you that the sound of the "golden age" is alive in the voice of tenor Joseph Calleja. He's a young singer with an old-school sensibility, and he's just released his third album for Decca Records.

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8:04am

Wed October 19, 2011
Business

DeLorean DMC-12 Goes Electric

The Delorean CEO unveiled a prototype of the car over the weekend. It's lighter and stronger. It keeps the steel frame and the gullwing doors. The vehicle goes on sale in 2013 for around $90,000.

7:51am

Wed October 19, 2011
Europe

Workers Discover Love Lingers After 1,500 Years

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 1:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

They died around 1,500 years ago, at the end of the Roman Empire. They were buried inside the walls of a palace in the northern Italian town of Modena. But their love lived on. Workers renovating the palace discovered the couple laying side by side, now just bones, but still holding hands, their arms entwined, her head turned towards his. As one who saw the couple put it, a rare and touching scene. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

4:00am

Wed October 19, 2011
Business

Business News

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 1:21 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Wall Street taking a bite out of Apple. Apple shares dropped more than six percent, after the company said quarterly profits rose only 54 percent over last year. Investors are used to Apple blowing past analysts' expectations, and yesterday's numbers came in below predictions, so they were a disappointment.

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4:00am

Wed October 19, 2011
Business

American Airlines To Report 3rd Quarter Earnings

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 1:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

All of the major U.S. airlines are expected to report a profit for the third quarter, except for American Airlines. Its earnings come out later today. If United Airlines and Delta can make money in this economy, what's the problem with American? NPR's Wade Goodwyn explains.

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4:00am

Wed October 19, 2011
Business

Fed Chairman Want Better Communication With The Public

Ari Shapiro talks to David Wessel, of "The Wall Street Journal," about why the Federal Reserve and its Chairman Ben Bernanke are very unpopular these days.

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