Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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4:00am

Mon October 3, 2011
Research News

3 Scientists Win Nobel For Immune System Studies

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 7:19 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, host: Three scientists have been awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for their work on understanding the immune system. However, it turns out one of the scientists died several days ago, which could mean that he was not eligible for the prize. Joining us now is NPR science correspondent Jon Hamilton.

Thanks for joining us, Jon.

JON HAMILTON: Good to be here.

NEARY: Let's start with this scientist who died. Who was he, and why might his death make him ineligible for the Nobel Prize?

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4:00am

Mon October 3, 2011
Africa

Anti-Gadhafi Loyalists Accused Of Abusing Power

Residents of the Libyan capital Tripoli are growing increasingly angry at abuses said to be carried out by armed anti-Gadhafi groups. Some allege that once rebel fighting brigades have become criminal gangs, looting and intimidating at will.

12:01am

Mon October 3, 2011
Books

In 'Boomerang,' Cheap Credit Exposes Nations' Flaws

For his book exploring the global financial crisis, Michael Lewis visited countries to see where the money went.
Tabitha Soren

No two countries are experiencing the global financial crisis in the same way. And according to author Michael Lewis, you can tell a lot about each country by looking at its problems — and how they're being dealt with.

To research his new book, Boomerang, Lewis went on what he has called a "financial disaster tour." He surveyed some of the most financially challenged countries in the world from Iceland and Ireland to Greece and the United States.

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7:55am

Fri September 30, 2011
NPR Story

Details Emerge After Reports Of Awlaki's Death

Yemeni officials are saying Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen, was killed while traveling between two provinces in Yemen. Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Dina Temple-Raston about reports of the death of Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen.

7:22am

Fri September 30, 2011
Strange News

'Onion' Takes Heat From D.C. Police For Hostage Story

The satirical newspaper The Onion is in trouble with the U.S. Capitol Police. The Onion reported gunshots at the capitol Thursday, saying Congressional leaders took schoolchildren hostage and demanding $12 trillion in cash. Police felt obliged to issue a denial. A spokesman says, "There is no credibility" to the stories in the fake newspaper.

7:15am

Fri September 30, 2011
Strange News

Casino Offers Plastic Surgery Sweepstakes

Atlantic City's Trump Taj Mahal is offering a new kind of shopping spree. One lucky winner will get $25,000 to spend on plastic surgery. Reaching for humor, the Taj announced that its "Nip, Tuck and Lift" sweepstakes will "change the face" of casino promotions. The winner can get lyposuction, a facelift — or take the cash instead.

6:04am

Fri September 30, 2011
Life In Retirement: The Not-So-Golden Years

What Is Retirement, Anyway?

Planning for retirement isn't just about mutual funds, 401(k)s and reverse mortgages anymore. With the traditional notions of retirement changing, figuring out how to spend our later years requires a different approach.

4:06am

Fri September 30, 2011
Around the Nation

In Wood Pulp Country, A New Plan For Conservation

Roxanne Quimby, here with Millinocket Lake guide Matt Polstein, wants to donate 70,000 acres of land to the National Park Service along with an endowment to manage what would be a national park in Maine's North Woods.
Susan Sharon for NPR

For more than a decade, there's been talk of creating a new national park in the heart of the Maine woods. Most locals were opposed from the start, but as the economy here changes, opposition is softening.

For generations, Maine's North Woods have provided pulp for the state's paper mills and created plenty of good jobs in an area with little other economic activity. But now the paper industry is struggling and a mill job is no longer a guarantee.

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4:04am

Fri September 30, 2011
Opinion

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The Joy Of Letters

A simple "Wish you were here" can mean so much more than an overwrought email.
istockphoto.com

Postal workers held rallies around the country this week, trying to save their jobs. The U.S. Postal Service faces a deadline Friday for billions of dollars in debt payments it can't afford. It's considering closing hundreds of branches.

Commentator and former NPR East Africa correspondent Gwen Thompkins says she doesn't plan to cut back on writing letters.

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6:33pm

Thu September 29, 2011
Music Interviews

Feist: A Pop Star With A Punk-Rock Past

Feist's new album, Metals, comes out Oct. 4.
Mary Rozzi

It's been four years since Leslie Feist released "1234," the career-making single that also became a testament to the power of a still-nascent YouTube. Feist, who performs under her last name, took some time off from performing after that surge in popularity. But she'll return next week with Metals, her first new album since 2007.

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8:42am

Wed September 28, 2011
Monkey See

Idris Elba: The Man Who Is Luther, Was Stringer, And Could Be James Bond

Idris Elba as John Luther in Luther, which returns on BBC America Wednesday night.
Kerry Brown BBC America

Idris Elba tells Linda Wertheimer on Wednesday's Morning Edition that he didn't come to the United States from the UK to play "black roles," but merely "roles." And he has: roles like Stringer Bell on HBO's dark drug epic The Wire and John Luther, the central character of Luther, a drama series that returns for a second season tonight on BBC America.

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7:28am

Wed September 28, 2011
Strange News

For A Crocodile, He's Awfully Orange

Originally published on Wed September 28, 2011 9:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: Good morning. I'm David Greene.

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7:22am

Wed September 28, 2011
Strange News

Homesick Minnesotan Makes Logos For State's Lakes

The Land of 10,000 Lakes is being rebranded. Fast Company reports Nicole Meyer missed Minnesota's lakes when she moved away to Phoenix. She's keeping her Midwest roots in mind by designing logos for EACH Minnesota lake. She creates one per day, meaning she will finish in 27 years.

10:00pm

Tue September 27, 2011
Sweetness And Light

We're All Just 'Guys'

Opening night for Guys and Dolls on Broadway or, for Frank Deford, "Guys and Guys."
Joe Corrigan Getty Images

As best as I know, I own the distinction of being the first human being to call our national attention to a linguistic phenomenon.

This was back in 1972, in an article in Sports Illustrated about Robyn Smith, who was then the best female jockey in the land. Smith referred to married couples as "you guys." I was so bemused that someone might actually refer to a woman as a guy that I felt obliged to mention it in the piece.

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8:24am

Tue September 27, 2011
Strange News

Cheeseheads Take Issue With Anti-Cheese Billboard

A billboard went up near the Green Bay Packers' stadium showing the grim reaper decked out in a cheesehead hat. A physicians group promoting vegan diets says its new ad simply points out that cheese can be unhealthy. Green Bay's mayor says this is silly. As he put it, "We love our cheeseheads and we love our cheese."

8:21am

Tue September 27, 2011
Business

Living Or Dead, Who Belongs On A U.S. Stamp?

Until Monday, only people who had been dead for at least five years could appear on U.S. postage stamps. It was, in that way, a little like becoming a saint. But now the Postal Service is inviting suggestions for living people who deserve to be on a stamp. People can submit their ideas through Facebook and Twitter — and, of course, by mail.It's Morning Edition.

4:41am

Tue September 27, 2011
Author Interviews

For One 'Wiseguy,' A Permanent Place In Mobster Lore

Originally published on Tue September 27, 2011 2:07 pm

Crimelore(d): Wiseguy author Nicholas Pileggi
Sigrid Estrada

Twenty-five years after its initial publication, Nicholas Pileggi's Wiseguy remains one of the signal narratives about life in the Mafia. Adapted by Pileggi and director Martin Scorsese into the 1990 film GoodFellas, it follows the rise and fall of true-life Brooklyn gangster Henry Hill — "a little cog" in the Lucchese crime family who turned FBI informant after a drug arrest.

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4:30am

Mon September 26, 2011
Election 2012

Voters May Face Slower Lines In 2012 Elections

Elections are expensive. And with money tight, election offices across the country are facing cutbacks.

This means voters could be in for some surprises — such as longer lines and fewer voting options — when they turn out for next year's primary and general elections.

A lot of decisions about the 2012 elections are being made today. How many voting machines are needed? Where should polling places be located? How many poll workers have to be hired?

'We're Down To A Critical Level'

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4:30am

Mon September 26, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

When It Comes To Pain Relief, One Size Doesn't Fit All

iStockphoto.com

When you get a headache or suffer joint pain, perhaps ibuprofen works to relieve your pain. Or maybe you take acetaminophen. Or aspirin. Researchers now confirm what many pain specialists and patients already knew: Pain relief differs from person to person.

Dr. Perry Fine is president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. He also sees patients and conducts research at the University of Utah Pain Management Center.

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12:01am

Mon September 26, 2011
Fine Art

Andy Warhol's 'Headline': Sensationalism Always Sells

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 2:52 pm

By 1985, Warhol's style had evolved substantially; on this untitled headline piece, he collaborated with Keith Haring.
National Gallery of Art

Pop artist Andy Warhol died in 1987, but he's making his presence felt around the nation's capital these days. He's featured in an art fair, in restaurants, in galleries and in two major museums. The Hirschhorn Museum is exhibiting silkscreens and paintings Warhol did — of photographs of shadows. And the National Gallery of Art has its first one-man Warhol show, Headlines, focused on a series of paintings he made of Page One tabloid headlines.

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10:06am

Fri September 23, 2011
Economy

A Greek Default Would Spread Debt Contagion

European leaders insist they will take all necessary measures to ensure Greece does not default on its debt. A default would throw Greece's economy — and the European banking system — into deeper crisis. But many financial experts are advocating an orderly default. They argue it will be painful but preferable to round-after-round of painful austerity measures and more uncertainty.

7:47am

Fri September 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Hilton Denies It Overcharged DOJ For Muffins

Hilton Worldwide hosted a legal training conference for the Justice Department. News reports cited the department's inspector general saying Hilton billed the government $16 for each muffin. The company says its receipts were misinterpreted. Hilton says the price included fruit, a drink, tax and tips.

7:41am

Fri September 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Volunteers In Indianapolis Gear Up For Super Bowl

Two thousand volunteers showed up for training recently. When the Super Bowl comes to Indianapolis, volunteeers will greet fans at the airport or give directions. The city's team, however, may not make it to the big game. The Colts are 0-2 so far this season.

7:33am

Fri September 23, 2011
Asia

Pakistan Deals With Flooding, Terrorism Accusations

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 7:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And let's go next to Pakistan, the scene of both a natural disaster and political turmoil. And we'll talk about the disaster first. NPR's Julie McCarthy is on the line from a flood zone in southern Pakistan. Julie, hi. Where are you?

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6:53am

Fri September 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Marines React To Buddy 'Coming Out' On The Radio

Earlier this week, Marine Major Darrel Choat revealed on Morning Edition that he is gay. Choat made the statement on the day that "don't ask, don't tell" was formally repealed. That law had banned gays from serving openly in the military. Steve Inskeep checks back in with Choat to hear how those he serves with reacted to the news.

6:42am

Fri September 23, 2011
Asia

Pakistan Responds To Sharp Accusation From U.S.

Pakistan lashed out at the U.S. for accusing the country's most powerful intelligence agency of supporting extremist attacks against American targets in Afghanistan. Steve Inskeep talks to Alex Rodriguez, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, about what Pakistan had to say.

6:28am

Fri September 23, 2011
Games & Humor

Video Game Simulates War Correspondent Tasks

A video game being developed lets you in on what it's like to be a war correspondent. It's called Warco. Instead of carrying guns and weapons, players in this war game carry a video camera.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Detractors: Indiana Voucher System Promotes Religion

Indiana's new voucher program allows families with incomes up to $62,000 to take a portion of the funds that would have gone to a public school and convert it into a scholarship that can be used at a private school. The program has brought an enrollment rush at Catholic schools. Opponents fear the vouchers could siphon money away from public schools, and uses state funds to offer religious education.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

'Moneyball' Revolutionizes How Baseball Is Played

The new film Moneyball opens in theaters this weekend. It is a rare sports movie that deals with more than wins and losses. It follows the entertaining, real-life quest of a sports revolutionary who wanted to rethink how baseball is played.

4:00am

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

Wounded President Returns To Yemen After Treatment

Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh today returned to the country after more than three months in Saudi Arabia for medical treatment. He had left Yemen after being seriously injured in an attack. The country has faced turmoil in recent months as anti-government demonstrators called for the ouster of Saleh. For more on this development, Steve Inskeep speaks with journalist Tom Finn, who's in Sanaa.

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