Morning Edition

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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne, Steve Inskeep and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 5:51 a.m. and 6:51 a.m. each morning.

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Syracuse school board member Bill Bullen has stepped down after three years in the post. Not having a background as an educator, Bullen says there was a lot to learn when he was elected to the Syracuse Board of Education in 2011.

He says enacting a comprehensive plan for the district’s future goals was a big achievement, as was diminishing the fiscal problems the district faced seemingly each budget year.

Surrounded by his cast mates and the show's executive producer, Transparent star Jeffrey Tambor faced a crowd of journalists backstage at the Golden Globe awards Sunday, and made the case for why his win as best actor in a comedy meant more than a typical Hollywood honor.

"This is about changing people's lives," said Tambor, who won his award playing a 70-year-old coming out as transgender. Earlier, while accepting his award on national TV, he dedicated his award and performance to the transgender community.

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Up to 1,000 people, including the president of New York’s NAACP, Hazel Dukes, will hold a rally at the Capitol today to try to convince state  lawmakers to fulfill a 2006 court order to spend billions more dollars on New York’s schools each year.

The groups say to fulfill the court order, schools need an addition $6 billion a year, with a greater share going to the poorest schools

Durrie Bouscaren / WRVO File

New York state Republicans are working together with breakaway Democrats in the state Senate. Syracuse-area Republican Sen. John DeFrancisco says it’s a relationship that worked in the past, though it's different this year.

Two years ago Republicans faced the proposition of being the minority party in the state Senate, so they struck up a deal to share power with the Independent Democratic Conference (IDC), a group of five breakaway Democrats.

Onondaga Community College

Officials at Onondaga Community College like President Barack Obama’s proposal to allow students to attend two years of community college for free.  

Amy Kremenek, vice president of human resources and external relations at OCC, points to the statistics of who attends the two-year college in Syracuse to show how a program like this would be valuable.

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Since 2001, more active-duty American soldiers have killed themselves than were killed in Afghanistan.

President Barack Obama acknowledged the soaring suicide rate in the United States military in a speech in North Carolina last summer. Obama said, "We have to end this tragedy of suicide among our troops and veterans. As a country, we can't stand idly by on such tragedy, so we're doing even more.”

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

When the temperatures drop below zero in the winter, we layer on extra jackets and hunker down inside. The residents at Syracuse's zoo have different ways of dealing with the bitter cold elements.

A pool of bubbling water is probably the last place a human would look for warmth on a frigid January day. But it’s a reprieve from the wind chill for the small Humboldt Penguins at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse.

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The Palestinian decision to join the International Criminal Court this month comes at a challenging time for the world's only permanent war crimes tribunal.

The ICC is just over a decade old and has had to back off from some controversial cases, including one in Kenya, where an investigation collapsed into the country's president for election violence. The Hague-based court may have to walk an especially fine line in the Middle East.

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Bitter cold: the basics of hypothermia

Jan 9, 2015
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In these cold winter months, the risk for hypothermia rises. You don't have to be an outdoor enthusiast or an avid hiker, in fact, don't even have to be outside to develop hypothermia. A few degrees means the difference between a normal core body temperature, and a temperature dangerously close to hypothermia.

This week on "Take Care," we speak with Dr. Chris McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about hypothermia and how to avoid it.

Ex-Miami Dolphins Player Swims To Safety

Jan 9, 2015
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The legislative session is off to a subdued start, with the governor’s State of the State message delayed for two weeks. Nevertheless, fault lines are already forming over some key issues, including rent regulations and how to measure teacher performance.

Some rights reserved by Samantha Celera

A bad flu virus continues to spread through the community, as flu cases in Onondaga County are up five-fold from this time last year.

The flu is coming early and often for much of the United States, according to health officials, and central New York has not been spared.

A bitter cold snap has descended on the Middle East; in Lebanon, they call the storm Zeina. And in a muddy cluster of tents and huts close to the city of Saida, refugees from neighboring Syria say she showed no mercy.

"The wind, the wind, God almighty, it was a storm," says one Syrian woman, Gamra al-Khalil. A tree fell on her corrugated-metal shack, crushing half of it, just missing her family.

"It's this year that's the worst," Khalil says. "We're dying of cold."

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AARP Members Tour Cutting Edge Tech Show

Jan 9, 2015
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