Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 6:51 a.m. and 8:51 a.m. each morning.

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Payne Horning / WRVO News

On an overcast afternoon, a graduation ceremony is underway inside the Oneida County Jail, but instead of caps and gowns, the graduates are wearing bright orange jump suits. 

As the inmates glide to the front of the room, they are greeted with diplomas, smiles and piercing stares from several guards who watch their every move. These behavioral improvement courses and high school equivalency education programs at the jail are nothing new. Opening the graduation ceremonies to the media is. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Hundreds of protestors opposing a controversial Midwest oil pipeline marched through downtown Syracuse over the weekend. They walked six miles from the Onondaga Nation Arena to downtown Syracuse, carrying signs about protecting water sources.

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What Does Trump's Victory Mean For NATO?

Nov 11, 2016

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, which has ensured peace in Europe since the end of World War II, woke up Wednesday to what seemed like a nightmare: an incoming U.S. president who openly questions the value of the alliance.

During his campaign, Donald Trump repeatedly criticized NATO, calling the organization "obsolete." He also suggested that America might not defend fellow NATO countries that didn't help reimburse the U.S. for the cost of its troops and bases in Europe.

Peace of mind for hospice patients' pets

Nov 11, 2016
Giorgio Quattrone / Flickr

When a patient goes under hospice care, their well being and comfort is the priority. But in this stressful time, families are often unable to care for the patient’s pet. But sometimes a pet's unequivocal love is exactly what the hospice patient needs. Now, a national organization is trying to help fix this problem. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the president and founder of Pet Peace of Mind, Dianne McGill.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is adopting a more conciliatory tone toward President-elect Donald Trump, after Cuomo called Trump “un-New York” in the final days of the campaign.

Cuomo, in the final days of the campaign, stumped for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in New York state, and heavily criticized Donald Trump.

“In truth, Trump is un-New York,” Cuomo said. “Everything the man stands for is the exact opposite that this state stands for.”

Trump, like Cuomo is a Queens native.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a $30 million dollar airstrip that will test unmanned aircraft or drones will be built in central New York. The flight traffic management system is part of an overall push to drive the drone industry into the region.

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The viewers of Channel 7 evening news in Watertown will soon say goodbye to a familiar face on television. For 20 years, WWNY-TV anchor Brian Ashley has delivered the evening news every weeknight. Ashley is moving on to join the Fort Drum Regional Liaison Organization as its new leader.

Ashley began his broadcast career in radio while living across the border in Canada, where he's from originally. He moved onto TV in 1994 to host the evening news on Channel 7 alongside his wife, Ann Richter.

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Toy Hall Of Fame To Reveal Class Of 2016

Nov 10, 2016
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To celebrate Renee Montagne's last week hosting Morning Edition, we listen back to some of her favorite stories, including a piece about schoolgirls in Kandahar, Afghanistan. This story originally aired Nov. 25, 2010.

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If the numbers hold, Republicans are poised to remain in control of the New York State Senate, and even pick up a seat.

The news has reassured business groups but dismayed reform advocates. If the election results hold, Republicans will have the numerical majority when the Senate reconvenes in January.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

While New York would not be as greatly affected as other states if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, there could be some changes to the health exchange. Republicans, controlling the House, Senate and soon the presidency, are now positioned to repeal President Obama’s healthcare law.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Central New York tow truck operators are calling on Albany to beef up the “move over” law that motorists to either slow down or move over when approaching emergency vehicles or vehicles with flashing yellow lights, like two trucks or road maintenance vehicles, on the side of the road.

There have been three deaths in recent weeks on upstate New York roadways involving motorists not paying attention to New York’s law. A state trooper, maintenance worker and tow-truck operator have all been killed by oncoming traffic while they were tending to an issue on the side of the road.

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Finally, we have come to the end, the end of a presidential process that began well over one year ago, kicking off in primaries that included close to 20 Republican candidates and half a dozen Democrats.

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It wasn't so long ago that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell declared on this program that the Republican Party was at an all-time high. Some people guffawed. But it was true that Republicans dominated everything but the White House.

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As we wait for Hillary Clinton's concession speech, this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. With Renee Montagne, I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Brian Mann / NCPR

Rep. Elise Stefanik stormed her way to a second term last night. The Republican from Willsboro won the North Country’s congressional seat by more than 90,000 votes in unofficial returns. The Democrat and the Green in the race were both handed stinging defeats.

Jubilation in Glens Falls

It was a jubilant and confident night in a packed ballroom at the Queensbury Hotel as a beaming Elise Stefanik greeted volunteers and supporters after winning every single North Country county – often by landslide margins. Young volunteers chanted "Elise! Elise! Elise!"

Republican control of Congress could mean more clout for upstate NY

Nov 9, 2016
Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

Several races for Congress in upstate New York were expected to be competitive, but Republicans won those comfortably. Some experts say the GOP winners in the region got a boost from Donald Trump’s name at the top of the ticket. And having Republicans control all branches of government could mean more leverage for upstate residents.

Reed Extends a Hand

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Let's go next to the city of Istanbul, Turkey. It's on the dividing line between Europe and Asia. And it's where NPR's Peter Kenyon covers the Middle East. He's been listening to responses to last night's election here, what people are saying there. Hi, Peter.

New York State Senate

Democrats had hoped to make inroads into the New York State Senate. But preliminary results show the Republicans gaining one seat to hold a razor-thin 32-seat majority.

Despite a corruption scandal among Republicans on Long Island, incumbent GOP senators apparently kept their seats, and won an open seat formerly held by a Republican.

In close races in the Hudson Valley, GOP candidates also held on, and in a western New York swing district that includes portions of the Buffalo area, Republicans took the post back from Democrats.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

 

Democratic Assemblywoman Addie Russell overcame a rematch challenge from Republican John Byrne to hold on to her seat in the 116th Assembly District. She defeated Byrne 53 percent to 47 percent, or by roughly 2,500 votes, in unofficial returns. The district runs from Cape Vincent to Massena along the St. Lawrence River. Russell was seen as vulnerable after having nearly lost to Byrne two years ago.

Russell's supporters gathered inside a new business in downtown Watertown -- and indoor children's playground called Fun Escape. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican Rep. John Katko is the first incumbent in more than a decade to be reelected to the 24th Congressional District. The district flipped back and forth between Republicans and Democrats in the past four congressional election cycles.

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