Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-10 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 6:51 a.m. and 8:51 a.m. each morning.

Mike Folsom

Shipping traffic on the St. Lawrence River has resumed after a luxury cruise ship stuck in the Eisenhower Lock in Massena was removed Saturday. The ship struck a wall as it attempted to maneuver into the lock Thursday night.  Passengers on the MS St.

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Seagull Injures Classic Pianist

Jun 19, 2015
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Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Central New York Regional Economic Development Council is getting ready to put together a proposal for the latest competition for state economic development dollars.  

Facebook, social comparison and depression

Jun 19, 2015
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Americans are spending more and more time on social media. But that can lead to an unexpected impact on the mental health of social media users. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "take care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview University of Houston social psychologist Mai-Ly Nguyen Steers about her research into the links between Facebook and depression. Steers’ study "Seeing Everyone Else's Highlight Reels: How Facebook Usage is Linked to Depressive Symptoms," was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

(Be warned: This story has lots of spoiler-ish details about True Detectives' first few new episodes)

As I watched the first three episodes from HBO's new season of True Detective, one thought kept nagging: Why isn't this more, well, surprising?

Consider this scene, featuring Colin Farrell as Ray Velcoro, a police officer whose wife has been beaten and raped. Vince Vaughn is Frank Semyon, a crime boss who slips Farrell's character a picture of the possible culprit.

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A new animated feature from Pixar aims to do the near-impossible, as any parent would tell you: get inside the mind of a preteen girl. Inside Out is about an 11-year-old girl named Riley, but the real stars are her emotions — five colorful characters representing joy, sadness, anger, fear and disgust.

Pete Docter, the creative force behind Up and Monsters, Inc., wrote and directed the film, and actress Amy Poehler plays Joy. Both of them laugh about one of the biggest challenges of the movie: deciding how many emotions to include.

Mario Loiseau works two jobs, including long hours as a parking lot attendant, to help pay for his 9-year-old daughter Mabou's tutoring. Mabou is a science and language prodigy and is already studying college-level algebra.

"So Daddy, how did you feel when I was born?" she asked her father during a recent visit to StoryCorps in New York City.

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It's in details from South Carolina that you sense a community insisting on its humanity in the face of awful news. The news was the killing of nine people in a Charleston church.

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Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

 

The Greater Utica Chamber of Commerce held what they're calling "chamber day" for the first time on Thursday. The goal was to connect local businesses in the Utica area to each other.

 

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​The legislative session is now likely to go into next week, as ​Gov. Andrew Cuomo and ​lawmakers ​have agreed to renew New York City’s rent laws for five days, ​​as they ​struggle to reach final deals on that and other remaining issues.  

The leader of the state Senate, John Flanagan, said he’d allow senators to go home for a few days, after they finish their business Thursday evening, even though there are no agreements with the Assembly or Cuomo on the New York City rent laws, a related tax break for real estate developers, and an education tax credit.

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And let's hear one more voice on this tragedy. It is South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley who has been speaking with reporters this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Copyright 2015 Georgia Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit http://www.gpb.org/.

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New York politicians are raising concerns that the sale of medical device manufacturer Welch Allyn could put central New York jobs in jeopardy.

When Hill-Rom announced Wednesday morning that it is acquiring Welch Allyn, it did not say that any jobs would be eliminated at the Skaneateles Falls-based company. But that's what was immediately on the mind of the lawmakers who represent the central New York in Washington, D.C.

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) told reporters Wednesday he had a “call in” to company representatives to find out more.

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Bret Jaspers / WSKG News file photo

The city of Syracuse is moving ahead with a strategy to improve access to broadband for businesses and residents.  

The problem is there aren’t enough affordable, high speed internet broadband options for residents or businesses in Syracuse. And that means that Syracuse isn’t competing on a level playing field with other cities when it comes to economic development, says Ben Walsh, Syracuse’s deputy commissioner of neighborhoods and business development.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Leaders of all of the state’s local governments, as well as unions representing teachers and public workers, are warning state lawmakers not to simply renew the state’s property tax cap without some changes.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

The legislative session is expected to  continue for at least longer than scheduled, as Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders remain gridlocked on extending New York City’s rent laws, and have not settled a host of other issues. The session was supposed to end Wednesday.

Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, following a private meeting with Cuomo, says he expects the session to last at least another day, as they continue to struggle with renewing the now expired rent regulations.

As summer approaches, the city of Syracuse is again cracking down on a sector that's caused trouble in low-income neighborhoods in the past, corner stores.

City hall’s crackdown on corner stores is meant to curb what Mayor Stephanie Miner has in the past called a scourge in many neighborhoods -- corner stores that have health and safety issues, leading to neighborhood complaints.

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FCC Fines AT&T For False Data Plan Promises

Jun 18, 2015
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9 Die In Charleston, S.C. Church Shooting

Jun 18, 2015
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House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, (R-Wis.) says approving a massive trade package sought by President Obama will allow the U.S. to "write the rules" of the global economy. Parts of the package are now in limbo in the House.

Ryan spoke with NPR's Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep about the trade deal and about Trade Promotion Authority, also known as fast-track, which would allow the president to negotiate the trade agreement with Pacific Rim nations known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership and then have Congress pass it with an up-or-down vote.

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