Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

pboyd04 / Flickr

Many health professionals recommend eating less salt. But why is too much salt bad for your health? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Norman Kaplan of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, whose textbook on high blood pressure, "Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension," is in its 10th edition.

Lorraine Rapp: So when it enters our system, what actually takes place in the body that causes it to have harmful effects on our blood pressure?

Fear is in the mind of the beholder

Oct 21, 2013
charamelody / Flickr

You’re watching a scary movie. As the suspense begins building, you notice that your heart rate increases, your pupils dilate, and you that you are beginning to sweat. Is it hot in the room? No, that’s not what’s causing it. What you’re experiencing is good ol’ fashioned fear.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Liz Phelps discusses two kinds of fear: real and fake. Dr. Phelps is the director of the Phelps Lab at NYU and a professor in psychology. Her research focuses on how human learning and memory are changed by emotion, and what neural systems mediate the interactions between the three.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Phelps.

dreyboblue / Flickr

Halloween wouldn’t be the same without horror films, costumes, and of course, candy. The more candy, the more successful the trick-or-treating. But when children start sorting through their sugary treasures, it may not be a bad idea to have a toothbrush on standby to help combat the real horror of Halloween — cavities.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Thomas Salinas talks about why sugar, something most people -- particularly kids -- love, can cause cavities and dental decay. Dr. Salinas is a professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic, a world renown medical practice and research group in Rochester, Minnesota.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Salinas.

Why exactly is sugar bad for your teeth?

Oct 18, 2013
Steven Guzzardi / Flickr

October 31 is right around the corner, and with Halloween comes candy. We've all been told, with too much candy comes cavities. But why does sugar cause tooth decay? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Thomas Salinas, professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic about how cavities occur and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about sugar that causes cavities?

How to get the most out of the modern day ER

Oct 13, 2013
Mark Coggins / Flickr

When people hear “emergency room,” thoughts of high stress medical situations that could play out on televised shows such as ER often come to mind. While this is fitting to a certain extent, more and more people are finding themselves at the ER to deal with situations that used to be dealt with in the doctor’s office. This is because the ER has changed dramatically in more ways than one.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Leana Wen discusses how the modern ER works and how to prepare for a visit to it. Dr. Wen is an attending emergency physician and director of patient-centered care research at George Washington University, and the author of When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Wen.

You can't go wrong with fall veggies

Oct 13, 2013
Leah Landry / WRVO

What do you think of when you hear the words "fall foods?" For children, “fall foods” may mean candy corn and Halloween treats, while others may think vegetables -- things like squash, cabbage and beets. These fall under the category of autumnal vegetables, and can provide many healthy benefits to consumers of them.

This week on Take Care, nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about what makes fall vegetables good for you. Rogus is a registered dietitian in central New York who's been a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for over 25 years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

spykster / Flickr

It comes in many different forms and can show up in many different places — on top of something, under something, around something, inside of something. Clutter can essentially happen just about anywhere. While this description may sound a bit scary, one psychologist insists it’s not as scary as many people may think.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio discusses how to manage clutter. Zasio is clinical psychologist who specializes in anxiety disorders. She has appeared on the A&E reality television show Hoarders, and is the author of The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, Uncluttered Life.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Zasio.

Do you know when to visit the emergency room?

Oct 11, 2013
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The emergency room has become an integral part of the American medical system. But how do you know when you should go to the E.R.? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen about what you should know before you have to visit an emergency room.

Lorraine Rapp: Can you give us a quick overview of how emergency rooms have changed over the years—how it might affect us as patients?

itsv / Flickr

Fall brings many great things—the leaves begin to change color, apples are ripe for the picking — but on the other end of the spectrum, fall also brings something that nobody looks forward to — flu season. A simple flu shot, which is easy to get, may equip people with all the immunity tools they need to fight off the flu. But surprisingly, the majority of people don’t take advantage of it.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joseph Bresee discusses how the flu shot works and why people should get it. Dr. Bresee is the chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control, and helps create the yearly vaccine he believes more people should be receiving.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Bresee.

Coping with empty nest syndrome

Oct 6, 2013
Mandy Jansen / Flickr

Leaving home for the first time can be very stressful on a child. Whether they are moving away to college or relocating for a job, the process is one of change and readjustment. But the parents who raised that child often have an even more difficult time adjusting -- resulting in what is known as empty nest syndrome.

This week on Take Care, Kimberly Key talks about why empty nest syndrome develops, and how it can be used as a motivator to positively turn someone’s life around. Key is a psychotherapist and a nationally certified counselor who specializes in holistic human development and the founder of Encompass Work & Family, which helps people evolve through life’s stages.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Kimberly Key.

paulswansen / Flickr

Every year at this time, public health officials encourage Americans to get a flu vaccine, but the majority of people choose not to have a flu shot. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Bresee of the Centers for Disease Control about how the vaccine works to prevent the flu, and why the CDC recommends it.

Mark Knobil / Flickr

Everyone has something they can’t quite let go, whether it’s all the back issues of their favorite magazine or their favorite sweater from 2003 that no longer fits. What happens when this feeling spreads to many other items as well, to the point where it starts to not only compromise your home, but your daily life as well.

The recent popularity of the A&E reality television show Hoarders has opened up a national conversation on the topic of compulsive hoarding, which many are starting to realize can be a serious psychological issue rather than just a strong feeling of nostalgia towards physical items.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio talks about compulsive hoarding and the treatment process for it. Dr. Zasio is a clinical psychologist that specializes in anxiety disorders. She has appeared on Hoarders, and is the author of the book “The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, and Uncluttered Life.”

 Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

tyfn / Flickr

Chemotherapy is one of the best known forms of cancer treatment, and while often effective, it can leave behind a number of side effects, like hair loss and nausea. Some who have undergone chemotherapy also have claimed to have felt foggy, forgetful and not as sharp as they were before the treatment. Largely ignored by the medical community in the past, this symptom, which is referred to as “chemo brain,” is finally starting to come to the forefront in medical research.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Michelle Janelsins talks about the research she and others are now conducting on chemo brain. Janelsins is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery, Cancer Control at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, where she got her PhD.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Janelsins.

Chemotherapy can cause many side effects like hair loss and nausea. But for years, many cancer patients have said it causes something else, forgetfulness and memory loss, or what cancer survivors call "chemo brain." Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Michelle Janelsins of the University of Rochester, who is leading a research study into chemotherapy's effects on cognitive function.

Lorraine Rapp: The term “chemo brain” is relatively new. How do researchers and medical doctors actually define that term?

Year-round youth sports mean more injuries

Sep 22, 2013
wynner3 / Flickr

Any casual sports fan knows that it’s football season. Just look at any high school on a Friday night or in the living rooms of Americans everywhere on Sundays. If you ask a child athlete when football season is though, their response may not be fall—it may be “all year.”

Year-round playing of a single sport is just one of the trends in youth athletics which have helped lead to an increase in youth sports injuries, according to Dr. Pietro Tonino. Dr. Tonino is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, and a leading expert on youth sports injuries.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Pietro Tonino.

Cherries & chocolate -- not just for dessert

Sep 22, 2013
D. H. Wright / Flickr

What do strawberries, dark chocolate and cherries all have in common? If you guessed that they all can help with your health and wellness, you are right. If you guessed that they are all delicious, we’ll give you that too.

This week on Take Care, a conversation about folk remedies with Denise Foley, an award-winning health journalist and the Contributing Executive Editor at Prevention magazine. She's the co-author of "‪The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Children: ‪From Allergies and Animal Bites to Toothache and TV Addiction, Hundreds of Doctor-Proven Techniques and Tips to Care for Your Kid."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Denise Foley.

The changing culture of youth sports

Sep 20, 2013

With children starting to play sports at younger ages and playing their sports year-round, the chance they are going to get injured is on the rise. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with Dr. Pietro Tonino, the chief of sports medicine at Loyola University in Chicago, about why these injuries are occurring and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: How has youth sports changed over the years?

Oscar Rohena / Flickr

With early detection and treatment, melanoma is nearly 100 percent curable.  But for patients with advanced stages of melanoma, this skin cancer is often regarded as one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Now, new advances in treatment therapies have provided dramatic improvements for those whose melanoma has spread.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about how melanoma is diagnosed and the variety of treatments now available.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

zoetnet / Flickr

Is love blind, or is it like a biological version of The Bachelorette? How does a woman pick her dream guy? Is it completely up to her, or is there a point in which her biological instincts take over? This week on Take Care, clinical psychologist and journalist Dr. Vinita Mehta discusses the issue most men are afraid to ask about -- how women pick their mates.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Vinita Mehta.

Melanoma treatments advancing rapidly

Sep 13, 2013

Lorraine Rapp: If you would, walk us through what happens when a person finds out their mole or growth is malignant. Who makes that diagnosis and what are the first steps taken once a person gets the diagnosis.

Celiac disease: how it's diagnosed and treated

Sep 8, 2013
SliceOfChic / Flickr

Celiac disease is a tricky medical disorder. When left untreated, up to 300 different symptoms can occur, and the elapsed time from the onset of those symptoms to an actual diagnosis averages about ten years.

Nancy Lapid, the managing editor for Reuters Health, and Dr. Daniel Leffler, the director of clinical research at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, both spoke with “Take Care” about this serious disease, which many people have only heard of in recent years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Nancy Lapid and Dr. Daniel Leffler.

Does an apple a day really keep the doctor away?

Sep 8, 2013
Kevin Maloney

We’ve all been told that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. In the over 150 years that saying has been around, many have taken it as common health knowledge. But are apples really that good for you?

According to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician from central New York, the reason the saying has stood the test of time is because of the truth behind it. When asked what health benefits an apple can provide, Joan believes an easier question to answer would be, “What doesn’t an apple do for us?”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Celiac disease -- more than gluten intolerance

Sep 6, 2013

Gluten intolerance has recently become a popular nutritional catch phrase. But behind the hype of the many gluten-free products currently on the market is an actual disorder called celiac disease. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Daniel Leffler, who is the director of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston about how the disease is diagnosed and treated.

How should you make the medicine go down?

Sep 1, 2013
e-MagineArt.com / Flickr

Capsules, chewable tablets, gel tabs -- Over-the-counter medications now come in so many different formulations, it's difficult to figure out what to take. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen....hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Spoke to Dr. Lindsay McNair, a pharmaceutical physician and professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, about how to best take your medicine.

Lorraine Rapp: There are so many forms that these over the counter medications come in. What was behind their development?

VCU Libraries / Flickr

Prescription drugs can be helpful to those that need them. But for others they can be dangerous or even deadly. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to New York State Assemblyman Michael Cusick, the lead sponsor behind a piece of legislation called I-STOP, or Internet System for Tracking Over Prescribing, which is intended to serve as a national model to end prescription painkiller abuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Assemblyman Cusick.

The I-STOP law: a doctor worries for his patients

Aug 25, 2013
Shawn Honnick / Flickr

The new I-STOP law passed by the New York State Legislature is aimed at reducing the amount of overdoses on prescription painkillers; although some groups worry it might do more harm than good. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Joseph Navone, president of the Upstate New York Society of Medical Oncology and Hematology, a group that specializes in pain and pain relief for patients.

Click 'Read More' to hear out interview with Dr. Joseph Navone.

The tragedies caused by prescription drug abuse, addictions, overdoses and ruined lives are not unique to New York state, but Assemblyman Michael Cusick realized a couple years ago that Staten Island, where his district is located, could be considered the epicenter of the problem.

“We have numbers that are staggering of people overdosing from prescription drugs and the theft of prescription drugs," Cusick said. "The misuse is rampant here on Staten Island."

Measure, manage & motivate: how fitness trackers can help

Aug 18, 2013
bfishadow/flickr

Do you ever wonder how many steps you’ve taken in a day or how many calories you’ve burned off on the treadmill? Do you wish you could have someone make sure you get out of bed and to the gym?  This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Jennifer Jolly, an Emmy-winning consumer technology journalist and host of USA Today’s “TechNow,” about the newest trend in working out – fitness trackers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Jennifer Jolly.

How anticipation and reward make the brain love music

Aug 18, 2013
MatthiasRhomberg/Flickr

It’s hard to make it through the day without listening to music whether it is on the radio, a computer or a portable mp3 player. But why do we get so happy listening to our favorite song, singing in the shower or even learning to play a musical instrument? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Robert Zatorre, a professor of neuroscience at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University, on why music makes our brains sing.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robert Zatorre.

Why 'music makes our brain sing'

Aug 16, 2013

For many people, music evokes an emotional response of pleasure. Neurologist Dr. Robert Zatorre, of McGill University in Montreal, has studied why our favorite songs cause those feelings. He recently wrote about his findings in a New York Times article "Why Music Makes our Brain Sing." And, as Dr. Zatorre told Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," the answer lies in the way the brain processes anticipation and reward.

Lorraine Rapp:  What has your research revealed as to why music affects us the way it does?

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