Take Care

Sunday evenings at 6:30 pm

A weekly conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Hosted by Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email both Linda, Lorraine and the show producers at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Why heroin use has become an epidemic

May 30, 2014

Use of the illegal narcotic heroin is on the rise across the nation and in New York state. In the last decade, the number of people hooked on heroin is estimated to have doubled. And it is claiming lives from actor Philip Seymour Hoffman to SUNY Oswego students. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with The New York Times reporter J. David Goodman, who has reported extensively on the causes and effects of the heroin epidemic.

Lorraine Rapp: Why do you think there is a rise in heroin use? What’s behind that?

Answer to preventing illness may be in Vitamin D

May 18, 2014
Shezamm

Vitamin D is the vitamin most often associated with sunshine, but could it also be used to prevent cancer and heart disease?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University and chief of preventative medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, discusses how clinical trials could prove that Vitamin D could help prevent diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and cancer.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joann Manson.

Sneezing more? Blame the 'pollen vortex'

May 18, 2014
dawnzy58

April showers may bring May flowers, but May flowers bring something that millions dread every year—pollen, the nemesis of allergy sufferers everywhere.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Linda Cox discusses why this year’s allergy season may be more difficult than most. Dr. Cox is an allergist and immunologist from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and is also president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Linda Cox.

The polar vortex is a term many of us learned for the first time this winter. But what you may not know is that the cold, long winter could be the reason so many people are sneezing right now. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Linda Cox, an allergist and immunologist who is president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, about what's being called the "pollen vortex."

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about a long and severe winter that sets us up for an extreme allergy season?

Sheree Zielke / Flickr

You've heard about it for years and you've come to accept it as fact, but is it backed by medical science or is a story repeated so often that it's taken on a veneer of truth? We pick apart medical facts from health and wellness urban legends in our segment "Debunk or da Truth." We ask the experts and come up with an answer you can trust. Here are some of the myths we've been busting lately:

The earworm

Some rights reserved AJ Cann

Any diagnosis of cancer can be scary. But cancers of the head and neck bring unique challenges because of the importance of this region to the body. These cancers can impact a patient’s ability to speak, swallow or breathe.

A cancer diagnosis is never welcome. But cancers of the head and neck can be particularly difficult to diagnose and treat. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. David Pfister, the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about the risk factors for these types of cancer.

Lorraine Rapp:  What are the most common forms of cancer that appear in the head and neck regions?

Lachlan Rogers / flickr

You caught an item on the news about toxic chemicals on cash register receipts. You think about the risks of handling receipts over your double cheeseburger at lunch as you step outside for a quick smoke break. What's wrong with this picture? Bad eating habits, tobacco consumption, and you're worried about dying from register receipts? We know fast food and smoking are bad for us, yet we focus on other perceived threats to our health and well-being.

This week on Take Care, journalist David Ropeik discusses how we often view risk through a distorted lens. Ropeik has taught this subject at the Harvard School of Public Health, and has written about it for The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today and Nova. He is the author of “How Risky Is It, Really? Why Our Fears Don't Always Match the Facts.”

The bug-eat-bug world of organic gardening

May 4, 2014
clara bonnet / flickr

Good night, don’t let the pest bugs bite… your plants, that is. Pests can be one problem affecting gardens, but it’s not the only thing to look out for, especially when it comes to organic gardening.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy talks about the basics of organic gardening. Jeanroy is a gardening expert, and covers herb gardening for the how-to website About.com. She’s the author of Canning and Preserving for Dummies, now in its second edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

Before moving, seniors should ask these questions

Apr 27, 2014
The Pointe at Kilpatrick / Flickr

After raising kids in the family home and living there for decades, it may be hard for aging adults to consider a life anywhere else. When debilitating illness or a terminal condition requires advanced care, options are limited. But for the senior who moves by choice, that next step can provide a wider variety of living options.  When should we be making that decision, and what should we look for when we plan for that next phase of our lives?

This week on Take Care, Barbara Dopyera Daley, a social gerontologist and elder life advocate in Syracuse,  explains a variety of housing options for seniors. Daley holds a master's degree in gerontology and public policy and consults with organizations, individuals and their families on issues related to care and aging.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barbara Dopyera Daley.

Moving out of a home and into senior housing may be a difficult decision. But with a wide variety of options available today, seniors can plan ahead with these choices in mind. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Barbara Dopyera Daley, a social gerontologist and elder life advocate in Syracuse. Daley discusses how to determine the right time to consider senior housing options.

Lorraine Rapp: When is the ideal time to be thinking about making this big move in one’s life?

Death is hard, but hospice can help patients and families

Apr 13, 2014
dreamingofariz / Flickr

Most people don't want to make plans for their own death, or for the death of their loved ones. But talking about death can assure that needs and wishes are met, and that patients are as comfortable as possible.

This week on Take Care, Amy Tucci, president and CEO of the Hospice Foundation of America, discusses how hospice care can ease the pain of death. Tucci explains how hospice care can not only help patients, but also their families.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Tucci.

Angioplasty: How balloons can save your life

Apr 13, 2014
Denise Chan / flickr

If bent the right way, a balloon can be used to make an animal. If pumped with hot air, a balloon can be used to fly. Balloons have many different functions, mostly in the realm of fun. But, balloons have also been used to save lives through a procedure known as angioplasty.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Amar Krishnaswamy discusses angioplasties. Dr. Krishnaswamy is an interventional cardiologist in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Krishnaswamy.

Hospice care can make death more comfortable

Apr 11, 2014

Nobody likes talking about death, but experts say having a conversation is an important part of making sure death is as comfortable as possible. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Amy Tucci, president and CEO of the Hospice Foundation of America. Tucci explains how hospice can help ease suffering for those who are dying and their families.

Lorraine Rapp: What are your suggestions of how to bring this up with people in your life so that you can talk about having a good death?

More ADHD diagnoses mean more kids on medication

Apr 6, 2014
ADHD och ADD

Some kids have short attention spans, and can act hyper or impulsive. But do these kids all need to be medicated? Today, 3.5 million children in the United States are on medication for Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder.

This week on Take Care, Alan Schwarz, a writer for The New York Times who has reported extensively on ADHD, discusses the rise of ADHD diagnoses in children. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 11 percent of school-aged children have been diagnosed with ADHD, but according to Schwarz, some of them may be misdiagnoses.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Alan Schwarz.

Better technology may flatline stethoscope use

Apr 6, 2014
Michael / flickr

The stethoscope may be the most recognizable tool in healthcare. It’s used to listen to the internal sounds of the body, and can be found in almost every doctor’s office. But with the development of better technology, the stethoscope may soon become obsolete.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson discusses new stethoscope replacements. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

Diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have been rising for the past 20 years. Today, 3.5 million children in the United States are on medication for the disorder. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Alan Schwarz, a writer for The New York Times who has reported extensively on ADHD. Schwarz discusses the rise of ADHD and how it is likely being over diagnosed.

Study shows equal marriages lack sexual spark

Mar 30, 2014
Ika Ink / Flickr

If you share the chores with your spouse, the two of you have what psychologists call a "peer marriage,” an egalitarian partnership. Maybe the husband cooks, vacuums, and loads the dishwasher, and you genuinely enjoy each other's company. But what about your sex life? The answer may reveal an unexpected outcome of modern marriage.

This week on Take Care, Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author of The New York Times article “Does a More Equal Marriage Mean Less Sex?” discusses how equality in marriage can impact a couple’s sex life. Her article has triggered a national debate on why peer marriages seem to have lost that sexual spark. Gottlieb is the author of The New York Times bestseller "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough" and three other books, as well as a contributing editor for The Atlantic.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Lori Gottlieb.

brownpau / flickr

Imagine getting a skin rash so painful that it compares to the intensity of pain associated with childbirth and kidney stones. The Center for Disease Control says that shingles can cause this kind of pain, and that one in three Americans will get it in their lifetime. Why exactly does shingles cause this kind of pain, and what is being done to prevent and treat it?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Pritish Tosh discusses the skin rash known as shingles. Dr. Tosh is assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic where he has collaborated with the Vaccine Research Group in basic science vaccine development. He’s a leading expert on emerging infections and preparedness activities related to them.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Tosh.

It's one of the most painful syndromes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say one in three Americans will get it eventually and those over 60 should be vaccinated. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Pritish Tosh, assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic,  about shingles and how to prevent it.

Lorraine Rapp: Let’s start at the beginning so we have a full understanding.  Exactly what is shingles?

What's the future for the nutrition facts label?

Mar 23, 2014
Dan Domme / Flickr

The Food and Drug Administration is changing the nutrition facts label for the first time since the 1990s. The changes will update the current labels, which have serving sizes that seem too small to many Americans and no prominence placed on the calories.

This week on Take Care, Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C., discusses the current nutrition facts label and how it may be upgraded.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Tracy Fox.

Going green with juicing

Mar 23, 2014
Creative Commons via Flickr

While the taste of vegetables may turn some people off, they contain nutrients that are vital for a healthy body. Turning to popular and creative methods such as juicing or making smoothies is a quick, easy and tasty way to consume these important vegetables. This approach has become so popular in recent years that juice bars have started to open up in some cities across the country.

This week on Take Care, Yuri Elkaim talks about green drinks. Elkaim is a registered holistic nutritionist, fitness expert and health coach, as well as a former professional soccer player. He currently writes a fitness blog at U.S. News and World Report.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Yuri Elkaim.

Nutrition facts label will be changing

Mar 21, 2014

The familiar nutrition label you see on every food and drink you buy will be changing. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C.  Fox discusses the current nutrition label and what changes might be coming.

Lorraine Rapp: I wondered if you would talk about how effective these labels have been in helping consumers make more informed decisions? Overall has the program been effective?

Quench your thirst for knowledge about water consumption

Mar 16, 2014
Vassilis Online / Flickr

We hear all sorts of recommendations when it comes to drinking water: drink 6-8 glasses of water a day, drink fluids when you have a cold and drink still water instead of flavored water or soda. All this advice is enough to make your head spin -- and your bladder swim.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Stanley Goldfarb discusses some common misconceptions about water consumption in part two of his interview. Goldfarb is a professor of medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He has a specialty in renal electrolyte and hypertension, and is a leading expert in the topic of water consumption.

Click 'Read More' to hear the second part of our interview with Dr. Goldfarb.

7 foods that can take your diet to a "super" level

Mar 16, 2014
gkdavie / flickr

The word “superfood” may sound a bit intimidating, but nutritionists believe they allow people to take their healthy diets to the next level. But what makes a food “super,” and what foods actually make the cut?

This week on Take Care, Rachel Berman talks about seven superfoods that can easily be incorporated into a healthy diet. Berman is a registered dietician and the health editor at About.com. She is also the author of Boosting Your Metabolism for Dummies and Mediterranean Diet for Dummies.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Rachel Berman.

Myths about water consumption debunked

Mar 14, 2014
Some rights reserved by BaronBrian

There are many theories about water consumption: but are they true? Is carbonated water as healthy as still water? Should you drink more fluids when you have a cold ? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen,  speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb,  professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.  Goldfarb debunks some of the myths about drinking water in part two of his interview.

Colonoscopy important for early cancer detection

Mar 9, 2014
wellcome images via Flickr

Colonoscopies easily fall under a category of medical tests that are important to have done, but are not easy to discuss. Colonoscopies have an uncomfortable stigma, despite the fact that most patients report not having a troublesome experience with them.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Rajeev Jain discusses the importance of colonoscopies.  Dr. Jain is a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Health Dallas and clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Jain.

Throwing cold water on popular theories

Mar 9, 2014
darrylh via Flickr

Water, water, everywhere. At least, that's what we've been told.

Health, nutrition, exercise and beauty experts of all kinds have said over the years that we need to consume a certain amount of water per day, that we need to drink water before and after exercise, that drinking lots of water can help you lose weight, that drinking lots of water helps the skin, and the list goes on and on.

But what’s the science behind all these claims?

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldfarb.

How much water does the body really need?

Mar 7, 2014
[cipher] / Flickr

Taking a water bottle to the gym or drinking a certain amount of water each day may seem like good choices.  But do they provide health benefits? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Goldfarb explains what his research has shown about why water is so important to the body but how you may not need as much of it as you think.

It's in the blood tests

Mar 2, 2014
Kenny Holston / Flickr

Getting blood work done can tell a patient a lot of things. With thousands of different tests available, it can be the answer that unlocks a certain medical ailment. After a patient gives blood though, where does that blood go and what is done with it? How exactly does drawing blood tell us what is going on with our bodies?

This week on Take Care, Anne Marie Mullin talks about the basics of blood work. Mullin is senior vice president of Laboratory Alliance, a state-licensed lab that provides testing to a 16-county region in central New York. She was trained at the National Institute of Health, and is board certified in transfusion medicine.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Anne Marie Mullin.

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