Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Now we head to London, where the Wimbledon tennis wrapped up on Sunday, with Novak Djokovic beating former champ Roger Federer. On Saturday, Petra Kvitova beat out Eugenie Bouchard to earn her second Wimbledon title. It was a tournament with plenty of drama and upsets. Joining us to tell us more about that is Hugh Muir. He's an editor with The Guardian and he covered Wimbledon for them. He's with us now from a studio at the paper. Welcome, thank you so much for joining us.

HUGH MUIR: You're absolutely welcome, Michel.

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And finally it's time for the feature we call In Your Ear. That's the part of the program where we ask some of our guests what they're listening to these days. But as this program winds down, our last broadcast is scheduled for August 1st, we thought it would be nice to hear what members of our staff are listening to. What they like to have playing as they workout, or chill out, or put the show together. So let's hear what the big boss, our executive producer Carline Watson, has on her playlist.

Jennifer Holliday won a Tony for her performance in 'Dreamgirls.' But the singer's life wasn't always glamorous. She talks with host Michel Martin about battling depression and her latest album.

B. Michael is one of a few top-tier African-American fashion designers whose designs are worn by some of Hollywood's top names. Host Michel Martin talks with the designer about his inspirations.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The economy added 288,000 jobs in June and the unemployment rate dropped to 6.1 percent. NPR's Marilyn Geewax and The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy discuss the latest jobs report.

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The Fourth of July is a time for firing up the grill and fireworks. But historian Kenneth C. Davis says Americans celebrate it on the wrong day. It's Independence Day trivia, with host Michel Martin.

OutLoud, a new StoryCorps project, records and amplifies the voices of the LGBTQ community.

Now 70, Patty Woods looks back to the late 1970s, when she met a woman who would become her partner — and leave a long-lasting mark on her life, despite the fact they were not able to be open about their relationship.

"I was working in a restaurant and she would come in every day for lunch. I was like, 'Oh my God, I want to know her,' " Woods tells her friend, 22-year-old Cedar Lay.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Actor Don Cheadle is known for his roles in film and television. In this encore broadcast, host Michel Martin asks Cheadle if he's hit a career peak and how he'll know when to call it quits.

The R&B singer says is trying to mend his marriage in unconventional ways. Michel Martin speaks with a pop culture panel to get their take on Thicke's methods and other stories of the week.

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MICHEL MARTIN: And finally, it's time for the feature we call In Your Ear. That's the part of the program where we typically ask some of the guests what they listen to, but as this program winds down - our last program is scheduled for August 1st, we thought it would be nice to hear what members of our staff are listening to - what they're playing when they aren't producing our groundbreaking show of course. So to start us off, let's hear the musical selections of one of our original and longest serving staff members - our director. Here's what's playing in his ear.

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I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We'd like to turn now to a new initiative from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA. NASA wants to know how their technologies can best be applied commercially and they are asking you for ideas. Daniel Lockney is here to tell us more about this. He is NASA's technology transfer program executive and he was nice enough to stop by our Washington, D.C., studios. Welcome. Thanks for joining us.

DANIEL LOCKNEY: Absolutely. Thanks for having me.

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Finally today, we're ending on a musical note. You might remember my conversation earlier this year with recording artist Stromae. He's already one of the biggest names in dance music in Europe. You're going to be hearing more about him because he is heading out on his first major North American tour later this year. Before then, though - soccer fans take note - he wrote Belgium's World Cup anthem, "Ta Fete." And you might catch it when the Belgians play Team USA tomorrow.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TA FETE")

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Black Men Can Be Emotional Eaters, Too

Jun 27, 2014

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Are Americans Bothered By Soccer?

Jun 27, 2014

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And I do want to mention that we reached out to the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and they said their response to the situation was explained in the letter that was sent to Kelly that we talked about on the program, and they have no further comment.

Business leaders and policymakers gathered at the White House to discuss how working families can get ahead. One participant explains how he feels companies can stay competitive and help families.

U.S. Sen. Tim Scott has become a leading conservative voice focused on building wealth among people of color. Scott tells host Michel Martin about his ideas for growing the economy.

Peter Anyang Nyong'o is a Kenyan senator. He's also the father of Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong'o. He talks to host Michel Martin about his own history and his family's newfound fame.

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