Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1pm

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Psychological Consequences Of Calling Obesity A Disease 2) Rethinking Punishment For Drug Offenders 3) Waxing Poetic About Politics And Jimmy Choos 4) 'Cuddly Toy' On Nonstop Rotation For Margaret Cho 5) Grandma Helping With The Baby: Dream Or Nightmare?
  • Monday, April 21, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) President Obama Will Skip China, But Asia Trip Sends A Message 2) A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students 3) No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home 4) Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug 5) Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-D.M.C?
  • Friday, April 18, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) 15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer? 2) To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque 3) New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays 4) Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea? 5) Should College Dropouts Be Honored By Their Alma Maters?
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream 2) Do America's Deportation Policies Work? 3) Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court 4) You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class 5) 'Miserable' Doctors Prescribe A Different Career 6) Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 1:30pm
    Stories: 1) Nigerian Extemist Terror Campaign 2) Rwanda Genocide's Tough Lessons On 'Othering' 3) Teen Twitter Threats: A New Forum For Stupid?

Pages

12:06pm

Thu November 8, 2012
NPR Story

Arab Spring Protests Inspire Latest Flobots Album

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:43 pm

Members of the alternative rock and rap band Flobots say their new album was inspired by the Arab Spring protests and the U.S. Occupy movement. Circles of protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square gave them the idea for the title song, "The Circle in the Square." Three group members talk to host Michel Martin about the intersection of art and politics.

12:06pm

Thu November 8, 2012
NPR Story

Can Bipartisanship Save Us From The Fiscal Cliff?

The election is over and the deadline for the so-called "fiscal cliff" is drawing closer. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax about how the two relate, and what it could mean for America's economic future.

12:06pm

Thu November 8, 2012
NPR Story

Challenges Of Going From War Zone To The Classroom

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 12:10 pm

Hundreds of thousands of service members are transitioning from bases to college campuses. As Americans get ready for Veterans Day, host Michel Martin discusses the challenges veterans face, and the programs that help them succeed. She talks with Meg Mitcham, a veteran and the head of veterans programs for the American Council on Education.

12:03pm

Wed November 7, 2012
NPR Story

Has The Tea Party Lost The Messaging Battle?

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 12:06 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. As a special post-election treat, we decided to gather some of our regular guests from both the Beauty Shop and the Barbershop. We didn't know what to call it, so we're just calling it the TELL ME MORE Salon. How does that work? Does that work? Salon is good?

Read more

12:03pm

Wed November 7, 2012
NPR Story

Does Second Term Give Obama Foreign 'Flexibility'?

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 8:34 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, we want to turn to the international arena. The race for the White House last night had people around the world glued to their TVs and radios and reaction is pouring in from political figures around the globe.

Here is a small sample of what we've been hearing, starting with a spokesperson for the Afghan Foreign Ministry.

JENAN MOUSSA: We look forward to advancing our existing strong, broad, multifaceted partnership with the United States.

CHANCELLOR ANGELA MERKEL: (Foreign language spoken)

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12:03pm

Wed November 7, 2012
NPR Story

Did Obama Win Or Did Romney Lose?

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 12:06 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're sure you know this by now, but just in case, President Obama won reelection and will serve a second term in office.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I believe we can seize this future together, because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. We are not cynical as the pundits believe. We are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. We are, and forever will be, the United States of America.

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11:19am

Tue November 6, 2012
Election 2012

Will Hidden Issues Make The Agenda Next Term?

Host Michel Martin continues the conversation about the big issues missing on the campaign trail. Issues like crime, caregiving, poverty and climate change might affect millions of people, but they may not win a lot of votes. Martin speaks with a panel of journalists about whether these issues will enter the conversation over the next four years.

11:19am

Tue November 6, 2012
Your Money

Angie's Tips On Avoiding Storm Scams

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 12:03 pm

Severe weather could be headed for regions hard hit by superstorm Sandy, so many homeowners are scrambling to make repairs. The rush might make them vulnerable to so-called storm chasers — con artists posing as contractors. Host Michel Martin speaks with Angie Hicks, founder of the website Angie's List, for tips on how to avoid home repair scams.

11:19am

Tue November 6, 2012
Education

Is The Nightly Homework Battle Worth It?

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 12:03 pm

A lot of kids hate homework, and studies show they're getting more of it than ever. But experts are questioning whether the work is worth it. Host Michel Martin discusses the debate over homework with a panel of parents, including regular contributor Jolene Ivey, psychologist Kenneth Goldberg and educator Stephen Jones.

11:52am

Mon November 5, 2012
Education

Is A Law Degree Still Worth It?

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 2:03 pm

A law degree used to pretty much guarantee a stable job. But journalist Elizabeth Lesly Stevens reports that thousands of law students are going into an industry that no longer has room for them. Stevens discusses her article with host Michel Martin, and they hear from NPR Facebook fans about whether a law degree is still worth it.

11:52am

Mon November 5, 2012
Election 2012

Polls Put Race Within 'The Margin Of Litigation'

Election Day 2000 ended in a stalemate and weeks of finger-pointing and legal battles. Host Michel Martin looks at whether the country has learned the lessons from that crisis in time for Tuesday's vote. She speaks with Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute, and Robert Pastor of the Center for Democracy and Election Management at American University.

11:52am

Mon November 5, 2012
Around the Nation

NY Public Housing Residents Hit Hard By Sandy

Nearly a week after superstorm Sandy pummeled the East Coast, thousands of Americans are still without basics like power and clean water. Host Michel Martin speaks with New York Times reporter Michael Wilson about how some New York Public Housing residents are facing unique challenges in the storm's aftermath.

11:52am

Mon November 5, 2012
Music

Crash Course In Music From Indian Country

Author Anton Treuer has written several books, including Everything You Wanted To Know About Indians But Were Afraid To Ask. For Tell Me More's occasional "In Your Ear," series, Treuer offers his crash course on music from Indian Country.

11:58am

Fri November 2, 2012
Remembrances

Navajo Code Talker George Smith Dies At Age 90

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And, unfortunately, we have some sad news to share here. George Smith, one of the famed Navajo Code Talkers, died on Tuesday at the age of 90. Smith enlisted in the Marines in 1943 and joined the elite unit of Code Talkers. He served in the Pacific theatre, eventually achieving the rank of corporal. The Code Talkers became military legends after the U.S. military began using the Navajo language to transmit tactical information during World War II. The code, which was never broken, is credited with helping the U.S. win the war.

Read more

11:58am

Fri November 2, 2012
Economy

What's The Priority: Unemployment Or Deficit?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, Superstorm Sandy might've turned out the lights along the East Coast, but Twitter was ablaze with comments. We want to talk about the good, the bad and the ugly that Sandy brought out on social media. We'll have that conversation in a few minutes.

Read more

11:58am

Fri November 2, 2012
Barbershop

The Politics Of Superstorm Sandy

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 3:22 pm

Host Michel Martin and the Barbershop guys weigh in on the politics of superstorm Sandy. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg says climate change is a major reason for endorsing President Obama. And New Jersey Republican Governor Chris Christie praised the president for his recovery efforts.

11:45am

Thu November 1, 2012
Election 2012

Sandy Raises Concerns For Nation's Infrastructure

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 12:03 pm

The cleanup effort is underway after superstorm Sandy, and questions are cropping up about the country's aging infrastructure. Henry Gomez reports for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. He put his questions to President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney well before the storm hit. He speaks with host Michel Martin, as part of NPR's "Solve This" series.

11:45am

Thu November 1, 2012
Election 2012

Voter Fraud Billboards Stir Controversy

Billboards declaring "Voter Fraud is a Felony" were recently taken down in some urban Ohio and Wisconsin areas. But not before civil rights groups said they could intimidate minority voters and decrease turnout. Host Michel Martin talks with WCPN reporter Brian Bull about the billboards, who paid for them, and concerns about their lasting impact.

11:45am

Thu November 1, 2012
Race

Who Is Native American, And Who Decides That?

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 12:03 pm

More than five million people in the U.S. claim some form of Native American identity, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. November is Native American Heritage Month and host Michel Martin kicks it off with the first in a series of conversations with author Anton Treuer. He talks about who is Native American and how that identity is determined.

12:03pm

Wed October 31, 2012
Beauty Shop

Was The Storm A Political Trick Or Treat?

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 12:18 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Finally today, we are going to step into the Beauty Shop. That's where we get a fresh cut on the week's news with our panel of women - writers, journalists and commentators.

Read more

11:21am

Wed October 31, 2012
Latin America

Haiti Tent Camps Bear Brunt Of Sandy

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 12:18 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Many Americans are still suffering from the effects of Superstorm Sandy. In a moment our panel of women journalists and commentators - we call it our Beauty Shop - will talk about how Sandy may or may not change the race for the White House.

Read more

11:21am

Wed October 31, 2012
Race

Is Racial Prejudice On The Rise?

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 12:18 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program we are going to talk about the impact of Superstorm Sandy on some places you might not be hearing much about. In the Caribbean, especially in Haiti, for example, the damage includes a significant loss of life. We'll try to find out why in a few minutes.

Read more

11:21am

Wed October 31, 2012
Race

Over The Top Hairdo Sparks Blogosphere Firestorm

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 7:41 pm

Michelle Joni Lapidos sports a big afro wig.
Courtesy of Michelle Joni Lapidos

Michelle Joni Lapidos never knew that she would fall in love with a big, black afro wig. And she certainly never knew it would change her life. But after she wore it to a dress-up party, that's exactly what happened. Now the white, Jewish "afro-girl" has been thrown in the middle of a racial firestorm.

It sounds like an experiment from a college sociology class, but Lapidos tells NPR's Michel Martin that she began wearing the wig with good, fun intentions. She was quickly called a racist by people who took offense to it.

Read more

11:39am

Tue October 30, 2012
Mental Health

The Psychological Damage From Superstorm Sandy

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 12:13 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, NPR has a new poll out on the presidential race, so we decided to talk a little bit about the science and business of polling and why so many polls conflict with each other. That's in just a few minutes.

Read more

11:39am

Tue October 30, 2012
Election 2012

Why Do Election Polls Vary So Much?

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 12:13 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, Shirley Sherrod lost her job at the U.S. Department of Agriculture after she was accused of making racist statements in a speech, an accusation that was false and a smear. Now she's telling her own story in her own way. She has a new book out and she'll tell us more about it in a few minutes.

Read more

11:39am

Tue October 30, 2012
Your Money

Why One Extreme Couponer Gave Up Clipping

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 4:55 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now for our conversation about personal finance. Especially in these lean times, savvy shoppers have been told never to leave the house without their coupons. Those who take it to another level call themselves extreme couponers. These big savers can load shopping carts with hundreds of dollars of merchandise and pay just a fraction of that for it. That's because they spend hours online writing companies and even dumpster diving to get as many coupons as they can.

Here's a clip from TLC's reality show "Extreme Couponing".

Read more

11:39am

Tue October 30, 2012
Politics

Shirley Sherrod Stands Up To The Politics Of Fear

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 12:16 pm

Shirley Sherrod was forced out of the Department of Agriculture because of a misleading video. An edited clip appeared to show her saying she didn't want to help white farmers save their land. But the entire speech made it clear that Sherrod was actually saying racism is wrong. She talks with host Michel Martin about her book The Courage To Hope.

12:00pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Politics

Hurricane Sandy, Unwelcome Guest For Elections

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 2:50 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, you have no doubt heard about the religious violence that's been plaguing northern Nigeria but you might not have heard about how a new university, led by an American educator, is hoping to play a role in bringing peace to that country as well as other difficult conflicts on the continent. We'll tell you more about it later in the program.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon October 29, 2012
World

Is Religious Violence In Nigeria The Whole Story?

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 2:50 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, just in time for Halloween, a new book for kids and tweens offers some fun facts and some frights about the great ghost stories of history. That's just ahead.

But, first, we take a look at the work of building education and fostering peace in Nigeria. You might have followed the stories about an anti-Western terrorist group called Boko Haram that had been blamed for a series of deadly bombings and other assaults mainly in Northern Nigeria.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Books

Author Offers Spooky New Take On Famous Ghosts

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 2:50 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Halloween is just around the corner, and whether or not you partake in the trick-or-treating and pumpkin carving, who doesn't love a spooky story? Maybe you're a fan of the tale of The Flying Dutchman, the phantom ship that is doomed to sail the oceans forever, or maybe you're more into the Headless Horseman, who famously terrorized the residents of Sleepy Hollow.

Read more

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