Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, July 28, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) NPR's New CEO Hopes To Improve Diversity At The Network 2) In Times Of Transition, Get Practical About Your Finances 3) Iyanla Vanzant: Clarity, Forgiveness Key To Tackling Big Transitions 4) NPR CEO Appreciates The Unique Sound Of Future's 'Look Ahead'
  • Friday, July 25, 2014 4:49pm
    Stories: 1) The GOP's New Plan To Tackle Poverty: Helpful Or Hurtful? 2) Before Passing The Baton, Spelman President Reflects On Tough Choices 3) Rapping 'Ice Ice Baby,' TMM Producer Doesn't Miss A Beat 4) In A Luxury Apartment, Is A Separate 'Poor Door' Segregation?
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Effective New HIV Treatment Makes Researcher 'Hopeful' In Fighting Epidemic 2) Racially-Charged Casting Call: 'Surprising' But Not Shocking To Insiders 3) Performer Rita Moreno's Famed Career Was 'Meant To Be' 4) Erykah Badu's 'Tyrone' Gives TMM Producer Amazing Stage Presence
  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Part-Time Work, Unpredictable Schedules: What's The Fix? 2) Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking' 3) Host Michel Martin Takes Musical Cues From Directors 4) 'Traces Of Blue' Blends Jazz And Pop To Create Unique Sound
  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014 4:43pm
    Stories: 1) Tweeting From A Conflict Zone: Does It Help Or Hurt News Reporting? 2) For Pregnant Women, New Guidelines Aim To Reduce Workplace Discrimination 3) Despite Disability, One Mountain Climber Reflects On His Advantages 4) When It Comes To Other People's Kids, Should Parents Intervene?

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11:47am

Wed August 22, 2012
Education

College-Bound Latino Students At New High

More Latino students are enrolling in college now than ever before, according to a report by the Pew Hispanic Center. But Latinos still lag behind other groups in preparing for and completing college. Guest host Viviana Hurtado discusses the report's findings with Richard Fry of the Pew Hispanic Center and the College Board's Jim Montoya.

11:47am

Wed August 22, 2012
Digital Life

How To Maneuver The Wild World Of Online Dating

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 12:03 pm

More singles are turning to online dating sites to search for that special someone. They can find dates based on religion, race, ethnicity or even eating habits. Guest host Viviana Hurtado delves into the world of niche dating sites with Erika Ettin. She's an online dating coach and the founder of the Washington-based business, A Little Nudge.

11:47am

Wed August 22, 2012
Dance

Tango Festival Lures Thousands To Buenos Aires

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 12:03 pm

Tango fans are flocking to the Buenos Aires Tango Festival & World Cup in Argentina. The tango is seen as a romantic and seductive dance, but you may not know that the dance may have gotten its start in brothels. Guest host Viviana Hurtado speaks with dance instructor Daniela Borgialli. She's participating in the dance competition.

11:36am

Tue August 21, 2012
Election 2012

Has The Damage Been Done For Todd Akin?

U.S. Senate candidate Todd Akin apologized for his remarks about rape and pregnancy, but calls have intensified for him to withdraw. Plus, a new e-book claims the Obama campaign is in a constant state of conflict. Guest host Viviana Hurtado speaks with Janice Crouse of Concerned Women for America and Joy-Ann Reid of TheGrio.com.

11:36am

Tue August 21, 2012
Africa

Missing Ethiopian Prime Minister Pronounced Dead

Ethiopians today are facing an uncertain future after the death of their leader, Prime Minister Meles Zenawi. He was last seen in public in June, and he reportedly died in a Belgian hospital. Guest host Viviana Hurtado discusses the implications of Meles Zenawi's death for the region with NPR Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

11:36am

Tue August 21, 2012
Children's Health

Choosing The Right School For Special Needs

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 12:03 pm

Transcript

VIVIANA HURTADO, HOST:

I'm Viviana Hurtado and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. You know it had to happen. Summer break is over in some parts of the country, or almost over. Children are heading back to school.

Read more

11:36am

Tue August 21, 2012
Your Money

Refinancing: How To Wade Through The Choppy Waters

Interest rates on mortgages are at an all-time low. But refinancing can be a daunting process. Financial guru and author Louis Barajas speaks with guest host Viviana Hurtado about the ins and outs of refinancing, and what consumers can do to make the process go more smoothly.

11:29am

Mon August 20, 2012
Election 2012

State Voter ID Laws Hang In The Balance

Transcript

VIVIANA HURTADO, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Viviana Hurtado. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, a new documentary looks at how well the military is able to take care of women who return from service. That's in a few minutes. But first we turn to the election.

Both candidates are fighting for votes on the campaign trail. There's a battle brewing in several states over who will be able to vote and how, this November. Since 2010, state legislatures around the country pass laws requiring varying forms of identification at the polls.

Read more

11:29am

Mon August 20, 2012
The Impact of War

The Challenges Female Vets Face When Coming Home

As more troops return home, the transition can be difficult, especially for women who served. Services designed to help veterans are not always equipped to deal with the needs of the nearly 2 million female vets. Guest host Viviana Hurtado discusses their unique challenges with women involved in the film, SERVICE: When Women Come Marching Home.

11:29am

Mon August 20, 2012
Author Interviews

What The Future Holds For The 'Kids Of Kabul'

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:08 pm

Afghanistan's decade-long insurgency has largely been fought by men. But in 2011, author Deborah Ellis went to Kabul to ask, how do Afghanistan's children see their future? She tries to answer that question in her recently released book, Kids of Kabul: Living Bravely Through a Never-Ending War. Ellis speaks with guest host Viviana Hurtado.

11:29am

Mon August 20, 2012
Africa

South African Pop Star Finishes High School At 60

Sipho "Hotstix" Mabuse's musical career brought him success and celebrity in South Africa. But he quit school at the age of 16 to launch his music career, and he always felt there was something missing. He tells guest host Viviana Hurtado why he decided to go back to school.

12:01pm

Fri August 17, 2012
Barbershop

Did Biden Cross The Line Or Just Offer Tough Talk?

Guest host Jacki Lyden and the Barbershop guys hash out vice presidential politics, including what Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney's VP pick, brings to the ticket. They also discuss Joe Biden's controversial comment that Romney's fiscal policy will put people "back in chains."

11:51am

Fri August 17, 2012
Faith Matters

Does Law Protect Prayer Or Exclude Non-Christians?

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 12:03 pm

Advocates say a public prayer amendment to the Missouri state constitution will strengthen the right to pray in public. But critics say it'll marginalize non-Christians. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with Missouri State Rep. Mike McGhee who sponsored the initiative, and the Anti-Defamation League's Karen Aroesty, who opposes it.

11:51am

Fri August 17, 2012
Election 2012

Has Romney Settled Debate Over Personal Taxes?

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney said Thursday that he's paid a rate of at least 13 percent in taxes over the past 10 years. But the Obama campaign again called on Romney to release more tax returns. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses this and other political news with Univision's Fernando Vila and Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel's Craig Gilbert.

11:51am

Fri August 17, 2012
Faith Matters

Nuns Ask Candidates To Spend A Day With The Poor

A group of Catholic nuns say they're worried about the way GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney will approach poverty and safety-net programs, if elected. So the nuns have invited him, and his running mate Paul Ryan, to spend a day with them, helping the poor. Sister Simone Campbell discusses the invitation with guest host Jacki Lyden.

11:30am

Thu August 16, 2012
Around the Nation

Undocumented Youth Line Up For A Chance To Stay

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we go to the Democratic Republic of Congo where a rebellion has displaced hundreds of thousands of people. Could it lead to a wider regional war? We'll ask.

Read more

11:30am

Thu August 16, 2012
Africa

Growing DRC Tensions Threaten Regional Stability

The Democratic Republic of the Congo is struggling to deal with rebels operating in the eastern part of the country. It's alleged that some rebels are being backed by the Rwandan government. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks to Reuter's Kinshasa correspondent, Jonny Hogg, about tensions that can threaten regional stability and renew an old rivalry.

11:30am

Thu August 16, 2012
Music

Underground Iranian Band Steps Out Of The Shadows

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 6:45 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Recently, a friend handed me an Iranian music CD and said you have to hear this. My friend is an Iranian filmmaker and once, long ago, he took me to an underground jazz concert in Tehran. It was dramatic traveling through back alleys to get to the gig and I did a story on it for NPR then in 1997.

One of the musicians I met that night was a bass player named Marob(ph). Speaking through a translator, he mentioned the freedom music creates, even in an authoritarian society.

Read more

11:30am

Thu August 16, 2012
Race

Tracking Death Helps Chronicle Lives In Deep South

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Michel Martin is away. It's time for a new Wisdom Watch conversation. That's the part of the program where we speak with those who've made a difference through their work.

In many communities, there are elders whose service goes far beyond their job description, be they ministers, teachers or doctors. Traditionally, these are respected members of the community who pass along traditions and insights.

Read more

12:03pm

Wed August 15, 2012
Around the Nation

Katrina Gave Fresh Start To A Man, An Institution

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Seven years ago, when the waters rose in New Orleans on August the 29th, they swamped a way of life in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Among the thousands of casualties in that city was a masterpiece, the New Orleans Botanical Garden.

Read more

11:38am

Wed August 15, 2012
NPR Story

Author Asks If Mumbai Money Can Flatten Tradition

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 9:40 am

Mark Pringle

As India celebrates the 65th anniversary of its independence, the cultural landscape of the nation is transforming rapidly.

According to Man Booker prize winning author Aravind Adiga, "If you are an Indian of my generation... there really was only one place you wanted to go to make it big and that was Bombay. "

Read more

11:38am

Wed August 15, 2012
NPR Story

NPR's Quist-Arcton Dusts To Ray Charles

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 12:03 pm

For Tell Me More's occasional series, "In Your Ear," guests talk about the songs that they turn to for inspiration. NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton shares the tracks she plays on repeat when she's on assignment or when she's at home in Dakar.

11:38am

Wed August 15, 2012
NPR Story

Will Romney's Pick Swing The Senior Vote?

Older voters make up a major voting bloc that both candidates will be courting, and Mitt Romney's pick of Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate has put Medicare and Social Security front-and-center. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses how these voters might respond with Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center.

11:38am

Wed August 15, 2012
Pop Culture

Has Marketing To LGBT Consumers Become Mainstream?

Not long ago, ads targeting gays and lesbians could only be found in alternative newspapers. Now Chevrolet, Levi Strauss and others are targeting that demographic. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with Advertising Age reporter Thomas Pardee about changes in LGBT-targeted advertising.

2:22pm

Tue August 14, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Family's Fight Against Bipolar Disorder Leads To Shock Therapy Success

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 2:56 pm

Linea Johnson, left, and her mother, Cinda, in May 2012 at the launch of their book on the family's struggle with Linea's bipolar disorder.
Tommy Voeten

The Mayo Clinic's confirmation Monday that Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. is receiving care there for bipolar depression is a reminder that the condition, which affects around 2.3 million Americans, can be treated.

But figuring out the right treatment for each patient can be a long and difficult road, as a new memoir called Perfect Chaos: A Daughter's Journey to Survive Bipolar, a Mother's Struggle to Save Her shows.

Read more

11:10am

Tue August 14, 2012
Around the Nation

Is Drought Slowly Killing US Farms?

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 12:13 pm

Farmers and ranchers continue to suffer from one of the country's worst droughts in 50 years. President Obama recently announced the government will buy up to $170 million of meat from farmers. But some say it's too little too late. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with Virginia farmer John Boyd and Harvest Public Media reporter Peggy Lowe.

11:10am

Tue August 14, 2012
Economy

Retail Sales Jump, But Are They High Enough?

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 5:30 pm

July saw the largest retail sales increase in months, according to the Commerce Department. But not all the news is rosy. NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax joins guest host Jacki Lyden to take a look at consumer spending and the "back to school" season.

11:10am

Tue August 14, 2012
Arts & Life

An Inner-City School With Gallery-Like Halls

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 12:13 pm

Chicago's Dixon School looks more like an African-American art gallery than a public school. In the largely black blue-collar neighborhood of Chatham, a school where art plays a central role in the lives of students is a rarity. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with director Pamela Sherrod Anderson about her documentary, The Curators of Dixon School.

11:10am

Tue August 14, 2012
Author Interviews

Surviving, Thriving In Spite Of Bipolar Disorder

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 12:13 pm

Cinda Johnson is an expert in youth disabilities and emotional disorders. But she never suspected her teen daughter Linea would have bipolar disorder. Linea's life took a downturn when she began feeling depressed and even suicidal. Linea and Cinda chronicle their story in the new memoir Perfect Chaos. They speak with guest host Jacki Lyden.

11:56am

Mon August 13, 2012
Election 2012

Should Black Voters Give Romney-Ryan A Chance?

Many conservatives were ecstatic with Mitt Romney's choice of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate. Even though few observers expect the ticket to draw much African-American support, conservative Lenny McAllister says black voters should give the team a chance. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with McAllister and the NAACP's Hilary Shelton.

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