Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dbe1c8bbad399ea09a|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Podcasts

  • Friday, August 1, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Is The Current Gridlock In Congress As Bad As It Looks? 2) For Ray Rice, Is A Two-Game Suspension Light Punishment? 3) Rabbi: During Transition, Look Back On Accomplishments 4) Marcus Johnson Trio Offers A Musical Treat For TMM's Final Show 5) Before Final Sign Off, Michel Martin Challenges Listeners To 'Tell Me More'
  • Thursday, July 31, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) 'Africa Is Champion': Reporting From A Changing Continent 2) Mexican Journalist Hopes His Reporting Can 'Bridge The Gap' 3) Despite Progress Of LGBT Rights In U.S., Challenges Remain Abroad 4) Playing 'Crazy Eyes' Taught Actress 'It's OK To Be Just You' 5) Ghanaian Rapper Hopes To Take His 'Afropolitan Dreams' Back Home
  • Wednesday, July 30, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Former CNN Anchor Bernard Shaw Kept Cool, But Paid The Price Of Success 2) Beauty Shop Ladies Weigh In On The Importance Of Mentors 3) When Searching For Mentors, Look 'Beyond Race' 4) Making Space For People Who Are Out Of the Spotlight
  • Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:43pm
    Stories: 1) Poet Nikki Giovanni On Change: 'Approach It With A Smile' 2) Where Do Dads Go For Parenting Advice? 3) After 7 Years, Moms Panelists Share How They've Changed
  • Monday, July 28, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) NPR's New CEO Hopes To Improve Diversity At The Network 2) In Times Of Transition, Get Practical About Your Finances 3) Iyanla Vanzant: Clarity, Forgiveness Key To Tackling Big Transitions 4) NPR CEO Appreciates The Unique Sound Of Future's 'Look Ahead'

Pages

12:36pm

Wed May 23, 2012
Commentary

Does Power Really Lie With Bystanders?

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 1:49 pm

Just as bystanders have the power to keep motorists and pedestrians in check, Tell Me More host Michel Martin suggests they also have sway over contentious social issues like same-sex marriage and immigration.
Fabian Bimmer AP

On my route home, there are a couple of stretches I tend to hit where, more often than not, there are a lot of people trying to cross the street at points where there are crosswalks but no stoplights.

And kids being kids, sometimes there's no crosswalk, but they're trying to cross anyway. Increasingly now, because there are new apartments going up, I also see more young working people marching across the street, carrying their take-out dinners, ear buds in place.

Read more

11:51am

Wed May 23, 2012
Election 2012

Does Obama Have A Messaging Problem?

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:46 pm

Republicans have pounced on a comment by Newark, New Jersey mayor and Obama re-election surrogate Cory Booker. He called the Obama campaign's attacks on Mitt Romney's time at Bain Capital "nauseating." Host Michel Martin discusses the art of messaging with former presidential speechwriter Mary Kate Cary, and journalism professor Cynthia Tucker.

11:51am

Wed May 23, 2012
Race

Civil Rights Leader: Equality Means Equality

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:46 pm

The NAACP is officially supporting same-sex marriage. The group says marriage equality is a civil right and is encouraging black voters to support the issue if it shows up on state ballots. Host Michel Martin talks with Julian Bond, chairman emeritus of the group.

11:51am

Wed May 23, 2012
World

Islamists Vs. Mubarak Holdovers In Egypt Elections

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:46 pm

Campaign fever is in the air in Cairo and around Egypt. Millions of voters go to the polls, Tuesday and Wednesday, for what many believe to be the country's first free election in its long history. Host Michel Martin discusses what's at stake in this election with Sherine Tadros, the Egypt correspondent for Al Jazeera English.

11:51am

Wed May 23, 2012
Latin America

Former Imprisoned Drug Smuggler On Story Of Escape

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:46 pm

In the 1970s, American Dwight Worker set out to smuggle cocaine from South America to the U.S. But his plan backfired and he wound up in one of Mexico's most notorious prisons. Worker tells host Michel Martin his story of imprisonment and escape.

12:00pm

Tue May 22, 2012
Money Coach

Do Credit Card Laws Not Value Homemakers?

Stay-at-home mom Holly McCall says she manages her family's finances and has perfect credit. But due to a federal law, she was denied a credit card because she doesn't make an income. McCall wants the law changed, but Aracely Panameno with the Center for Responsible Lending says the law is necessary. Host Michel Martin speaks with both women.

11:53am

Tue May 22, 2012
Television

Teen Actress Tia Mowry, Grown Up, Talks Motherhood

Tia Mowry of Sister, Sister fame is now all grown up, she just had a baby, and she's in the spotlight again with her twin sister in the reality TV show, Tia & Tamera. Host Michel Martin speaks with Tia Mowry about her career and her new book, Oh, Baby! Pregnancy Tales and Advice from One Hot Mama to Another.

11:53am

Tue May 22, 2012
NPR Story

Alice Randall On Race, Weight, And 'Ada's Rules'

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 12:13 pm

Author Alice Randall recently raised eyebrows when she wrote in an op-ed, "black women are fat because we want to be." This comes after the release of her new novel Ada's Rules where a preacher's wife takes care of everyone but herself, until she realizes she's gained 100 pounds. Host Michel Martin speaks with Randall and regular moms contributors.

11:57am

Mon May 21, 2012
Digital Life

Don't Trip Over Your Digital Footprint

Whether you're a pop icon or a high school teenager, no one's immune from public scrutiny. A status update or 140 characters can be enough to seriously offend others, and ruin your reputation. Host Michel Martin takes a look at the pitfalls of social media with blogger Latoya Peterson, and high school "Twitter Principal" Eric Sheninger.

11:57am

Mon May 21, 2012
Food

For Your Next Meal, Are Organs On The Menu?

Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema travels the country sampling the latest dishes. He gives host Michel Martin a slice of what's in and what's out in the food world, including some unusual experiments "ear to tail" cooking.

11:57am

Mon May 21, 2012
Law

What Happens When Justice Fails?

Defense attorneys recently argued that the men convicted of a 1985 murder should be exonerated or given a new trial. Patrice Gaines reported on the crime, and had doubts about the police version. Years later, she re-investigated and talks about the case with host Michel Martin. Advisory: This segment may not be comfortable for some listeners.

11:57am

Mon May 21, 2012
Music

New US Chess Champion Talks Music

Over the weekend, Hikaru Nakamura won the 2012 U.S. Chess Championship in St. Louis, Missouri. He's the top-ranked chess player in the country, and is now 2 1/2 points away from beating Bobby Fischer's all time record. For Tell Me More's series, "In Your Ear," Nakamura talks about the music that gets him pumped up for competition.

11:57am

Fri May 18, 2012
Barbershop

Is Obama's Same-Sex Statement All Talk, No Action?

Host Michel Martin and the Barbershop guys weigh in on Newsweek magazine's cover calling President Obama "The First Gay President." They also ask whether a parody video with New Jersey Republican Governor Chris Christie and Newark's Democrat Mayor Corey Booker will inspire more bipartisanship.

11:57am

Fri May 18, 2012
Remembrances

Donna Summer Defined Disco Culture Of 1970s

Disco queen Donna Summer has died of cancer at the age of 63. For many music fans, Summer's soaring voice and glittering style epitomized the excess and electricity of the 1970s. Host Michel Martin takes a look back at her music and her legacy with Mark Anthony Neal, a Duke University professor of black popular culture.

4:33pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Education

Janitor Cleans Up, Gets Ivy League Diploma

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 5:58 pm

Columbia University janitor Gac Filipaj shakes hands with his boss, Donald Schlosser, the assistant vice president of facility operations.
Jason DeCrow AP

Gac Filipaj is thrilled that he graduated this week from Columbia University.

"I'm still wearing the gown. I'm going to wear it for awhile," he told Tell Me More host Michel Martin just after Columbia's commencement ceremony. "And I look pretty well in that, to tell you the truth."

Read more

12:51pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Around the Nation

After Tornado Devastates, Joplin High Bounces Back

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 4:33 pm

The main entrance of Joplin High School was severely damaged in a May 2011 tornado.
Mark Schiefelbein AP

Nearly one year ago, a devastating tornado ripped through the city of Joplin, Mo. The tornado was the deadliest in the U.S in almost 60 years, killing 161 people and injuring more than 900. But life for Joplin's residents is finally starting to return to normal.

That includes life for students at Joplin High School. The school was destroyed by the tornado just hours after last year's commencement ceremony. Although the school's old location is still in ruins, the city has found a temporary solution to keep classes going.

Read more

12:48pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Remembrances

Go-Go Godfather Created Distinct DC Soundtrack

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 4:33 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today we want to pause to remember the Godfather - the Godfather of Go-Go, that is, Chuck Brown. He died Wednesday in Baltimore at the age of 75. His distinct take on funk music was the soundtrack of Washington, D.C. for decades. It struck a chord with fans of all ages and across genres.

This past August, Chuck Brown joined us in the studio to celebrate his 75th birthday and to talk about his life and work. Here's a little bit of that conversation.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Read more

12:11pm

Thu May 17, 2012
Wisdom Watch

Glenn Close: Mental Illness Shouldn't Be Old News

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 4:33 pm

Actress Glenn Close and her sister Jessie, who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in her late 40s.
Dan Hallman

U.S. audiences know her from the Oscar-nominated films Fatal Attraction, Air Force One and Albert Nobbs, and the Emmy-winning TV series Damages. But when Glenn Close is not wowing viewers onstage or onscreen, she devotes her time to raising awareness of mental health issues.

Read more

11:30am

Wed May 16, 2012
NPR Story

How To Address France's New, Unmarried First Lady

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 12:19 pm

France's new president was inaugurated Tuesday, and he's moving into the presidential palace with his longtime "companion." Host Michel Martin and the Beauty Shop ladies weigh in on political protocol when it comes to heads of state, politicians and their unmarried significant others.

11:30am

Wed May 16, 2012
Remembrances

Fuentes Criticized Power Before It Was Fashionable

Mexican author Carlos Fuentes died Tuesday at age 83. He was a prolific novelist whose work was read by everyone from the Mexican elite to the working class, making him one of the country's most influential social critics. Host Michel Martin speaks with OC Weekly columnist Gustavo Arellano about Fuentes' influence, both in Mexico and abroad.

11:32am

Tue May 15, 2012
NPR Story

Buying Facebook? Investing 101 For Newbies

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 8:20 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now, we turn from getting a start in the job market to getting started investing and call us crazy, but we are guessing that, even if you never read the business pages or watch those cable shows where people are talking really fast over a stock ticker, then you still might have heard that the social networking site, Facebook, is offering stock for sale to the public for the first time on Friday. It's called an initial public offering and shares would cost at least $34 apiece.

Read more

11:32am

Tue May 15, 2012
NPR Story

The Joys, The Challenges Of Adopting From Ethiopia

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 11:45 am

The desire to adopt has taken some would-be parents around the world. Now, the East African nation of Ethiopia is second only to China when it comes to international adoptions to the U.S. Host Michel Martin speaks with three parents about understanding Ethiopian adoption.

11:32am

Tue May 15, 2012
NPR Story

Can The Government Help Young People Find Jobs?

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 11:45 am

The school year is winding down, and lots of young people are in the market for a summer job. But finding one in this economy can be hard, especially for teenagers. Host Michel Martin speaks with Labor Secretary Hilda Solis about what the Obama Administration is trying to do to help.

11:49am

Mon May 14, 2012
Around the Nation

An Ongoing Journey To Fulfill A Mother's Last Wish

For those people whose mothers have passed away, Mother's Day is often a day of remembrance. Host Michel Martin speaks with one woman about her 10 year — and still counting — journey to fulfill her mother's last wish. Daniele Seiss' story, "My Mothers Ashes," was featured in this week's Washington Post Magazine.

11:49am

Mon May 14, 2012
Health

Is There A Better Way To Talk About Obesity?

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 12:03 pm

A recent study projects that more than 40 percent of Americans will be obese by the year 2030. Host Michel Martin delves into the cultural factors that might be preventing African-Americans and Latinos from losing weight. Martin speaks with Jane Delgado of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, and Jenee Desmond-Harris of The Root.

11:49am

Mon May 14, 2012
Music

'Law & Order' Star Inspired By Jazz, Soul, Blues

Award-winning actress S. Epatha Merkerson is best known for her role on Law & Order as Lt. Anita Van Buren. She spoke to Tell Me More earlier this year about hosting Finding Our Own, a program spotlighting the cases of missing people of color. For the series, "In Your Ear," Merkerson shares the music that inspires her.

2:36pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Game Changers

Hikaru Nakamura, The Next Bobby Fischer?

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 5:32 pm

Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

At the U.S. Chess Championships under way in St. Louis, all eyes are on America's top-ranked player, and the favorite going into the tournament, Hikaru Nakamura.

During the past decade, Nakamura has made a name for himself as the new superstar of American chess, and with it, he's become a kind of spokesperson for a game that hasn't been too popular in this country since the days of world champion Bobby Fischer.

Read more

11:25am

Fri May 11, 2012
Barbershop

Shop Talk: Are Black Men To Blame For Curvy Women?

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 4:04 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now, we head into the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

Read more

11:59am

Thu May 10, 2012
Arts & Life

This Mother's Day, Strike Up The Band

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we have a little reminder for those of you who may be a little forgetful when it comes to holidays. If you have been procrastinating or just not sure what to get Mom for Mother's Day, we have a suggestion. This year, you might skip the flowers and that overbooked brunch. Have a little music to say, thanks, Mom.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more

11:50am

Thu May 10, 2012
NPR Story

Vanessa Williams On Scandals, TV And Her Mom

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 11:59 am

Award-winning actress and singer Vanessa Williams stars on ABC's Desperate Housewives. She's come a long way since a 1983 Miss America scandal forced her to give up her crown. Host Michel Martin talks with Williams about co-writing the memoir You Have No Idea with her mother, who she says inspired her. Please be warned this conversation may not be comfortable for some listeners.

Pages