Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1pm

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) 15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer? 2) To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque 3) New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays 4) Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea? 5) Should College Dropouts Be Honored By Their Alma Maters?
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream 2) Do America's Deportation Policies Work? 3) Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court 4) You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class 5) 'Miserable' Doctors Prescribe A Different Career 6) Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 1:30pm
    Stories: 1) Nigerian Extemist Terror Campaign 2) Rwanda Genocide's Tough Lessons On 'Othering' 3) Teen Twitter Threats: A New Forum For Stupid?
  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) A Year After Boston Marathon Bombing, How Does Public Grief Help? 2) Late On Taxes? There's A Way Out 3) Hip-Hop Dreams Lead To Penning Poetry 4) Muslim Singer Yuna Moves To John Mayer's Music 5) Teen Sexting Not So Bad?
  • Monday, April 14, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Why Do More Latina Teens Get Pregnant? 2) Getting Enough Vitamin D: More Than Milk And Sunshine 3) Is A Beating In Detroit A Hate Crime? 4) Voice Of Mavis Staples Still Inspires 5) The Latino Experience In Appalachia 6) The Dangers Of Defaulting On Student Loans

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12:00pm

Tue February 21, 2012
Election 2012

Super PACS Create Fairness?

Super PACS have contributed millions of dollars to shape the 2012 presidential election. The "Citizens United" Supreme Court case paved the way for them. David Bossie, president of the conservative advocacy group Citizens United, speaks with host Michel Martin about how Super PACS could even the playing field.

12:00pm

Tue February 21, 2012
Your Money

A Family's Year Of Buying Black

Many consumers try shopping consciously by going to local stores or ones owned by certain faith or ethnic groups. Maggie Anderson and her family spent a year trying to shop exclusively at African American-owned businesses. They chronicled their efforts in the new book titled Our Black Year. Maggie Anderson talks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Tue February 21, 2012
Arts & Life

Mardi Gras Indians Tout Generations-Old Traditions

This 2008 image shows a Mardi Gras Indian marching in the annual Super Sunday second line parade in New Orleans, La.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Today is Mardi Gras, and people all over the world are celebrating with decadent meals, carnivals and parades.

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12:00pm

Tue February 21, 2012
Parenting

When Parents Are Addicts, What Happens To Kids?

Family, friends and fans flocked to New Jersey during the weekend for the funeral of Whitney Houston. The music legend was public about her struggle with substance abuse, and her daughter is one of millions who had to cope with that addiction. Host Michel Martin and a panel of parents discuss how parents' addictions affect their kids.

12:00pm

Mon February 20, 2012
U.S.

Can USDA Make Good With Female, Hispanic Farmers?

Latino and women farmers have complained for decades about discrimination from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The agency is offering to address those concerns, but many affected farmers are not satisfied. Host Michel Martin speaks with Frederick Pfaeffle, the USDA's Deputy Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights.

12:00pm

Mon February 20, 2012
History

Smithsonian Sheds Light On Founding Father's Slaves

Many Americans use Presidents' Day to reflect on the nation's core values, but the founding fathers often had complicated relationships with those ideals. A new exhibit explores that issue. "Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello" highlights the lives of slaves owned by the third U.S. president and the author of the Declaration of Independence. Host Michel Martin speaks with the exhibition's lead curators.

12:00pm

Mon February 20, 2012
Studio Sessions

Haitian Heritage In Cuba ... As Heard Through Song

In this encore broadcast, Michel Martin hosts the Creole Choir of Cuba for a performance chat. The group is credited with introducing the world to the rhythms of the Haitian community in Cuba. The 10 members are descendants of West Africans who were enslaved on that island. They sing songs of their ancestors, infused with contemporary sounds.

12:00pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Opinion

Destination Ghana: A Son's First Trip Home

Originally published on Fri February 17, 2012 5:00 am

NPR producer John Asante visits the Tetteh Quarshie Cocoa Farm in the eastern region of Ghana during his first trip to the West African nation.
Martin Ackon

As part of Tell Me More's series on memoirs for Black History Month, NPR producer John Asante explores his own family history. He describes his journey to Ghana — the birthplace of his parents and the burial place of his father. Asante shares what the trip taught him about his family and himself.


When most people are asked the question, "So, where ya from?" the response is pretty straightforward. You typically respond with a city, a state or a country. From there, you gauge how much more about your past you want to divulge.

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12:00pm

Fri February 17, 2012
BackTalk

Listeners Hyped About Hairless Mexican Dog

Tell Me More host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar share listener comments on this week's conversation about the debut of the xoloitzcuintli at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. They also share an update on Apple, which had a spate of negative publicity about working conditions in Chinese factories.

12:00pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Barbershop

Shop Talk: Ethnicity Driving 'Linsanity'?

Originally published on Fri February 17, 2012 11:16 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barber Shop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are freelance journalist Jimi Izrael. He joins us from Cleveland. Here in D.C. with me, civil rights attorney Arsalan Iftikhar. Sports Illustrated reporter Pablo Torre is in New York City. And from National Review magazine and the Texas Public Policy Foundation in Austin, Mario Loyola.

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12:00pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Your Money

Week Of Sweet, Sour Economy For Ordinary Americans

The labor market is improving, but Friday's consumer price index news shows that workers' paychecks are not keeping up with limited inflation. Hundreds of people visited NPR's Facebook page to comment on whether things are really getting better. Host Michel Martin and NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax sift through the stats and comments.

12:00pm

Fri February 17, 2012
Faith Matters

American Muslim Women Lift The Veil On Love Lives

Love InshAllah features personal essays from 25 women of different backgrounds and circumstances. Fans of love stories are curious and fascinated, but critics say the collection is salacious and sensational. Host Michel Martin and the book's contributing editor Ayesha Mattu discuss these stories of faith, love and the will to open up.

12:00pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Race

CNN Executive On Troubled Family Past

Mark Whitaker's family memoir, My Long Trip Home chronicles his upbringing in an interracial family, and his parents' struggles with personal demons and the weight of history. As part of Tell Me More's Black History Month series on memoirs, host Michel Martin speaks with Whitaker.

12:00pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Music

Music That Feeds The Soul

Former model B. Smith now has a growing brand that celebrates her love of Southern cuisine, including restaurants, cookbooks, home goods and wine. As part of Tell Me More's series, 'In Your Ear,' B. Smith offers up the playlist she listens to in her kitchen.

12:00pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Music

Grammy Winners Offer Secrets To Their Sound

For the last decade, the 26-member choir has captivated audiences including Bill Clinton and Nelson Mandela. Their blend of high energy, languages and musical traditions has won them numerous awards and a loyal fan base. They're now on a 43-city North American tour, and they stopped by for a performance chat with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Music

House Music Is My Religion, Says Professor

Author and professor Lester Spence recently spoke to Tell Me More about his book, Stare in the Darkness, which explores the influence of hip-hop music on American politics. But he says his personal playlist is made up of new and classic house tracks. He offers up his favorite cuts.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Around the Nation

Is Single Life Something To Lament Or Celebrate?

Yesterday, some singles saw Valentine's balloons and heart shaped boxes as reminders of the single life. With more Americans flying solo, how important is it to find "the one"? That's the question Ellen McCarthy set out to answer in a piece for The Washington Post Magazine. Host Michel Martin speaks with McCarthy and author Bella DePaulo.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Health

Family Planning, Chinese Zodiac Style

The recent Chinese New Year marked the start of the Year of the Dragon. Children born this year, according to the Chinese zodiac, are supposed to be smarter, stronger and more successful. That's why some Asian American parents are pulling out all the stops to get pregnant. Host Michel Martin speaks with Los Angeles Times reporter Rosanna Xia.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Sports

Basketball Legend On Soaring Above Challenges

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is perhaps one of the greatest basketball players of all time. He recently added another chapter to his storied career when he was named U.S. Cultural Ambassador by the State Department. Host Michel Martin speaks with the author and hall-of-famer.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
NPR Story

White House Official Cecilia Munoz On Budget Plan

President Obama's $3.8 trillion budget proposal calls for spending cuts and ambitious increases in education and transportation. But critics say it is nothing more than a re-election tactic. Host Michel Martin speaks with Cecilia Munoz, Director of the Domestic Policy Council.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
NPR Story

Are The French Outdoing Americans At Parenting?

Pamela Druckerman is causing a stir with her new book titled Bringing Up Bebe. The book argues that French parents raise better-behaved children than American parents. Host Michel Martin speaks with Druckerman, as well as Mathieu Garcon, who is a French dad, and Judith Warner, who wrote the modern motherhood book titled Perfect Madness.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
NPR Story

For The Mazatec, Chocolate Not Just About Candy

The gooey goodness can be traced back hundreds of years to Mexico, where chocolate has been cherished by the indigenous Mazatec people. On Valentine's Day, host Michel Martin explores the history and spiritual significance of chocolate with mother and daughter duo, Natividad Estrada and Diana Xochitl Munn.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Music

'The Steve Harvey Morning Show' Co-host's Playlist

Shirley Strawberry is the co-host of The Steve Harvey Morning Show and author of the relationship advice book The Strawberry Letter. As part of Tell Me More's "In Your Ear" series, she shares some of her favorite songs, including those from Maxwell, Marsha Ambrosius, CeeLo Green and Felanie Fiona.

4:37pm

Mon February 13, 2012
The Picture Show

Westminster Dog Show: Introducing The Xoloitzcuintli

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:02 am

Stewart, a Yorkshire terrier, relaxes in his hotel room after checking in at the Affinia Manhattan Hotel.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

It's that time of year — where hair dryers, treadmills and lush hotel rooms aren't reserved for us Homo sapiens, but for our canine best friends. The 136th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is off and running this week at New York City's Madison Square Garden. Organizers say it's one of the oldest sporting events in the country, second only to the Kentucky Derby.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
NPR Story

A Diva Gets Her Due

The legendary singer Diana Ross was honored at Sunday's Grammys. This was Ross' first Grammy win in spite scoring a dozen nominations throughout her singing career. Host Michel Martin offers a tribute to her remarkable life and work.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
NPR Story

Tuskegee Airman Jams To Coltrane And Ellington

During World War II, Roscoe Brown served with the Tuskegee Airmen, the U.S. military's first black fighter pilots. Recently, he worked as a consultant on the film, "Red Tails," depicting their story. As part of Tell Me More's series, In Your Ear, Brown offers up his personal play list.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Race

Film Reveals "Slavery" Persisted After Civil War

Most history books teach that slavery in the U.S. ended with the Civil War, but a new documentary airing on PBS challenges that. The film, "Slavery By Another Name," explores a system of forced labor that brutalized many black Southerners up to World War II. Host Michel Martin speaks with the film's director and co-executive producer.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Animals

Hairless Dog Loveable Or Just Ugly?

The rare hairless canine known as the xoloitzcuintli is Mexico's national dog. It's one of just six breeds to debut at this year's 2012 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Host Michel Martin speaks with xolo breeder Amy Fernandez, who is thrilled that the native dog of Mexico will be finally included in the show.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
NPR Story

Industry Remembers Pop Icon Whitney Houston

The talented but troubled singer was found unresponsive at a Los Angeles hotel on the eve of the Grammys. Debra Lee of Black Entertainment Television and music critic Steven Ivory join host Michel Martin to discuss Whitney Houston's life and legacy.

12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Faith Matters

Mixed Reactions To First Native American Saint

The Vatican recently announced that the 17th-century Mohawk woman, Kateri Tekakwitha, will be canonized as a Catholic saint. Many Native Americans say this is an honor, but others feel it legitimizes the abuses of colonialism. Host Michel Martin speaks with reporter Brian Bull, chair of the group, Native American Public Telecommunications.

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