Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1pm

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream 2) Do America's Deportation Policies Work? 3) Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court 4) You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class 5) 'Miserable' Doctors Prescribe A Different Career 6) Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 1:30pm
    Stories: 1) Nigerian Extemist Terror Campaign 2) Rwanda Genocide's Tough Lessons On 'Othering' 3) Teen Twitter Threats: A New Forum For Stupid?
  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) A Year After Boston Marathon Bombing, How Does Public Grief Help? 2) Late On Taxes? There's A Way Out 3) Hip-Hop Dreams Lead To Penning Poetry 4) Muslim Singer Yuna Moves To John Mayer's Music 5) Teen Sexting Not So Bad?
  • Monday, April 14, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Why Do More Latina Teens Get Pregnant? 2) Getting Enough Vitamin D: More Than Milk And Sunshine 3) Is A Beating In Detroit A Hate Crime? 4) Voice Of Mavis Staples Still Inspires 5) The Latino Experience In Appalachia 6) The Dangers Of Defaulting On Student Loans
  • Friday, April 11, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Possible To Have Both Fashion And Fairness? 2) Bringing Back Freshness And Flair To The Easter Table 3) Twitter Poetry: A Little Bit Of Real Estate Says A Lot 4) Al Sharpton: Rat Or Cat?

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12:00pm

Fri January 6, 2012
Faith Matters

'Flunking Sainthood,' Lessons From Failure

Despite the best intentions and plans for success, many New Year's resolutions fall by the wayside. Jana Reiss, author of the new memoir Flunking Sainthood, spent a year trying to reconnect with her faith. But she admits she failed at every step. Reiss speaks with host Michel Martin about what she learned from failure.

12:00pm

Thu January 5, 2012
NPR Story

Threatened In Tucson: Mexican American Studies

An Arizona administrative law judge recently ruled that a program in Tucson's public schools violates a state law banning classes that 'promote resentment toward a race or class of people.' But program supporters say the courses teach a neglected history and inspire Latino students to excel. The Los Angeles Times' Stephen Ceasar has reported this issue and speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Thu January 5, 2012
NPR Story

Broadcasting Legend Georges Collinet Offers Wisdom

Cameroon-born Collinet began his radio career in the 1960s, introducing American soul singers like James Brown to African audiences. Collinet became a famed broadcaster in Africa and a top expert on African Pop music. He speaks with host Michel Martin about his upbringing, worldview, and why black Americans have been slow to embrace Afropop.

12:00pm

Thu January 5, 2012
U.S.

Tough Task Of Being America's Top Whistleblower

Carolyn Lerner is hoping to bring the U.S. Office of Special Counsel out of its many years of obscurity within the federal government. The OSC aims to protect whistleblowers, eliminate government waste and protect federal workers from discrimination. Host Michel Martin speaks with Lerner, who's been heading OSC for six months.

12:00pm

Thu January 5, 2012
Sports

Olympic Hopeful Mixes Muslim Faith And Fencing

World-class fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad hopes to compete in the 2012 London Olympics. If she qualifies, it is believed that she will be the first practicing Muslim to represent the U.S. in women's fencing, and the first American to wear Islamic head-covering while competing. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed January 4, 2012
Politics

Republicans' Road Ahead, After Close Iowa Caucuses

Tuesday's Iowa caucuses shook up the GOP field as Mitt Romney won by just eight votes and Rick Santorum took second. Michele Bachmann finished sixth, then withdrew from the race on Wednesday. Host Michel Martin discusses the results and looks ahead with journalism professor Cynthia Tucker and contributing editor of The Weekly Standard Matthew Continetti.

12:00pm

Wed January 4, 2012
NPR Story

Beauty Shop: Virginia Ballot, Bachmann Quits Race

Host Michel Martin and the Beauty Shop ladies discuss controversial requirements for Virginia's presidential primary ballot, Michele Bachmann's suspension of her presidential bid, sports-related concussions, and black divas hawking weight-loss products.

12:00pm

Wed January 4, 2012
Technology

Outsmarting Your Spying Smartphone

That shiny new smartphone you got for Christmas boasts cool features and games, but buried deep in the software are tools that collect personal information. What exactly is being collected, and how should you take caution? Host Michel Martin speaks with John Verdi, senior counsel for the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

12:00pm

Wed January 4, 2012
Music

The Tuba Takes Its Spotlight In Mexican Bandas

Traditional Mexican music, known as 'banda,' has been popular in Southern California for decades. And now, the tuba has gone from carrying the bass line in the back of the band, to stepping out front and leading dance trains. Host Michel Martin speaks with musician Jesse Tucker and Sam Quinones, who's been reporting on the so-called tuba revolution.

12:00pm

Tue January 3, 2012
Economy

Housing Rebound In 2012?

The U.S. has gone through five years of foreclosed homes, vacant subdivisions and houses worth less than the owner's mortgage. Host Michel Martin and NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax discuss whether predictions of a turnaround in the housing market are realistic or just new year optimism.

12:00pm

Tue January 3, 2012
Money Coach

The 'Frugalista' Guide To Balancing Budgets

With the economy still in a slump, many people are resolving to start 2012 by getting their budgets in order. To break down the basics, host Michel Martin speaks with Natalie McNeal, author of The Frugalista Files. McNeal dug herself out of a $20 thousand debt in just two years.

12:00pm

Tue January 3, 2012
Your Money

When To Put The Brakes On Brand Names For Kids

Whether it's Air Jordan shoes or an Apple iPhone, kids and teens often covet brand name items, especially at this time of year. Is it okay for parents to give these trendy items to their kids, and how much? Host Michel Martin speaks with James Roberts, author of Shiny Objects, and three regular parenting contributors.

12:00pm

Tue January 3, 2012
World

Silence, Militants At Root Of Rapes In Somalia

Reports point to a dramatic rise in rapes of women and girls in Somalia, where severe drought and famine have killed tens of thousands of people and forced countless more, especially females, into refugee camps. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jeffrey Gettleman, East Africa bureau chief for The New York Times. (Advisory: This segment covers material that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Mon January 2, 2012
NPR Story

New Year Challenge: Throw Out 50 Things

Regardless of what resolution you've made for 2012, life coach Gail Blanke says starting the year right begins with ridding the clutter in your life. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her book Throw Out Fifty Things.

12:00pm

Mon January 2, 2012
NPR Story

Rita Dove On New Anthology, Advice For Young Poets

The Pulitzer Prize winner is best known for sharing intimate chapters of her personal life, while shedding light on the black experience in America. She's the first African-American to serve as U.S. Poet Laureate. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her latest work and life, and offers wisdom to young poets.

12:00pm

Mon January 2, 2012
Can I Just Tell You?

In Michel Martin's House: Spirit Of Revolt

In her weekly commentary, host Michel Martin shares that to her chagrin, her stepdaughters proposed to skip the china and use plastic plates for their holiday feast. The episode made Martin empathize with the deficit-cutters in Congress, and consider how tough it is to change the status quo until good-willed people choose to do so.

12:00pm

Mon January 2, 2012
NPR Story

Cancer Survivor Shares Tips For Starting 2012 Right

Many people are looking for a fresh start after a year filled with challenges. Best-selling author Bruce Feiler remade his life after a devastating cancer diagnosis in 2008. He talks with host Michel Martin about his advice for overcoming adversity and getting the right start for 2012.

12:00pm

Mon January 2, 2012
NPR Story

Big Honors For African-Americans' Small 'Firsts'

Steve Jobs and Amy Winehouse were among the stars who died in 2011, but what about the first African-American milk delivery man in Gary, Ind., or the first black meter reader for Baltimore Gas and Electric? Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson says these stories show how far the U.S. has come. She recently wrote about this in The New York Times Magazine, and speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Fri December 30, 2011
Politics

In 2011 Politics, 'Best New Artist' Is ...

Host Michel Martin looks at some of the year's top political moments with the 'Tell Me Awards.' Who are the winners and losers? Nominees range from Tim Geithner to the women who accused Herman Cain of sexual harassment. Martin talks with journalism professor Cynthia Tucker and U.S. News and World Report columnist Mary Kate Cary.

12:00pm

Fri December 30, 2011
Politics

Politicians Who Made You Laugh Out Loud In 2011

Originally published on Fri December 30, 2011 12:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

Coming up, social conservatives in Iowa have several candidates facing their support ahead of next week's caucuses, but one of the most prominent leaders among so-called values voters has thrown his support to an underdog. We are going to hear from Bob Vander Plaats about his endorsement. That's coming up in just a few minutes.

Read more

12:00pm

Fri December 30, 2011
Faith Matters

Iowa Evangelical Endorses The Political Underdog

As the Iowa caucuses rapidly approach, faith and family values play big roles in how local voters determine their support for candidates. Host Michel Martin talks with evangelical Bob Vander Plaats, who heads the Iowa-based conservative group, The Family Leader. He recently announced his personal endorsement for Rick Santorum.

12:00pm

Fri December 30, 2011
From Our Listeners

The Most Popular Stories Among Listeners In 2011

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Here, once again, is Ammad Omar, editor at TELL ME MORE. Welcome back, Ammad. What do you have for us?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Well, Michel, we're digging really deep into the mail bag today for some of our best listener interaction of the year, but we're going to go into the virtual mailbox, take a look at some of those stories that got a big response on Facebook, Twitter, email and our website.

Read more

12:00pm

Fri December 30, 2011
Barbershop

Shop Talk: No More Sex Tape Celebrity In 2012?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We cannot say goodbye to 2011 without asking the Barbershop guys to give us their final thoughts on the year.

So, sitting in the chairs for the final 2011 shape-up are author Jimi Izrael, civil rights attorney and author Arsalan Iftikhar, Sports Illustrated reporter Pablo Torre and Republican strategist and former White House aide Ron Christie.

Take it, Jimi.

JIMI IZRAEL: Thanks, Michel. Hey, what's up? Welcome to the shop. How we doing?

Read more

12:00pm

Thu December 29, 2011
Politics

Will Ron Paul's Past Cost Him In Iowa?

Republican presidential hopefuls are in the final days of campaigning ahead of the Iowa caucuses. Host Michel Martin explores the latest developments in the contest with Kevin Williamson, deputy managing editor of The National Review, and Michael Fauntroy, associate professor of public policy at George Mason University.

12:00pm

Thu December 29, 2011
World

Turkey Prospers Amid Neighboring Nations' Woes

As Europe suffered economic crises in 2011, Turkey's economy boomed. And as neighboring Arab countries faced political turmoil, Turkey became a bigger regional player. Martin discusses the country's good year with John Peet, Europe editor at The Economist, and Rami Khouri, international affairs expert from American University of Beirut.

12:00pm

Thu December 29, 2011
Food

Food Bloggers Take A Bite Out Of Kwanzaa

Thursday marks the fourth day of Kwanzaa, the weeklong celebration of African-American family, culture and life. The holiday also includes feasts that reflect the diversity of the African diaspora. Host Michel Martin speaks with Sanura Weathers, of the blog Kwanzaa Culinarians, about how various food bloggers are making their favorite recipes part of the Kwanzaa tradition.

12:00pm

Thu December 29, 2011
Remembrances

Jazz Extraordinaire Sam Rivers Dies At 88

The jazz saxophonist, flutist and composer passed away on Wednesday from pneumonia. He worked with Miles Davis, Billie Holiday and T. Bone Walker, and played an essential role in the abstract and avant-garde jazz movement. Host Michel Martin pays him a tribute.

12:00pm

Wed December 28, 2011
Around the Nation

For Grassroots Protests, Big Gains In 2011

All week, NPR is looking at people, events and ideas that fared well in 2011. Host Michel Martin explores how it was a good year for grassroots protests, both as part of the Arab Spring and the 'Occupy' movements. She speaks with NPR Cairo Correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson and Arun Venugopal, a reporter for member station WNYC.

12:00pm

Wed December 28, 2011
Politics

Black-Owned Beauty Shops Groom Political Activism

In her new book, Beauty Shop Politics, Professor Tiffany Gill looks at African-American women who owned beauty shops during decades before the civil rights movement. She speaks with host Michel Martin about how salons — then and now — have become centers for economic opportunity and political awareness.

12:00pm

Wed December 28, 2011
Arts & Life

African Prints More Sophisticated, Subtle In 2011

High-end fashion designers have been getting rave reviews for the African prints, textiles and shapes that they sent down the runways. Host Michel Martin explores how it was a good year for African prints and where the trend is going in 2012. She talks with online boutique owner Dolapo Shobanjo and style correspondent Robin Givhan.

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