Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1pm

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Friday, April 18, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) 15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer? 2) To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque 3) New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays 4) Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea? 5) Should College Dropouts Be Honored By Their Alma Maters?
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream 2) Do America's Deportation Policies Work? 3) Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court 4) You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class 5) 'Miserable' Doctors Prescribe A Different Career 6) Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 1:30pm
    Stories: 1) Nigerian Extemist Terror Campaign 2) Rwanda Genocide's Tough Lessons On 'Othering' 3) Teen Twitter Threats: A New Forum For Stupid?
  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) A Year After Boston Marathon Bombing, How Does Public Grief Help? 2) Late On Taxes? There's A Way Out 3) Hip-Hop Dreams Lead To Penning Poetry 4) Muslim Singer Yuna Moves To John Mayer's Music 5) Teen Sexting Not So Bad?
  • Monday, April 14, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Why Do More Latina Teens Get Pregnant? 2) Getting Enough Vitamin D: More Than Milk And Sunshine 3) Is A Beating In Detroit A Hate Crime? 4) Voice Of Mavis Staples Still Inspires 5) The Latino Experience In Appalachia 6) The Dangers Of Defaulting On Student Loans

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12:00pm

Wed December 28, 2011
Around the Nation

For Grassroots Protests, Big Gains In 2011

All week, NPR is looking at people, events and ideas that fared well in 2011. Host Michel Martin explores how it was a good year for grassroots protests, both as part of the Arab Spring and the 'Occupy' movements. She speaks with NPR Cairo Correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson and Arun Venugopal, a reporter for member station WNYC.

12:00pm

Wed December 28, 2011
Politics

Black-Owned Beauty Shops Groom Political Activism

In her new book, Beauty Shop Politics, Professor Tiffany Gill looks at African-American women who owned beauty shops during decades before the civil rights movement. She speaks with host Michel Martin about how salons — then and now — have become centers for economic opportunity and political awareness.

12:00pm

Wed December 28, 2011
Arts & Life

African Prints More Sophisticated, Subtle In 2011

High-end fashion designers have been getting rave reviews for the African prints, textiles and shapes that they sent down the runways. Host Michel Martin explores how it was a good year for African prints and where the trend is going in 2012. She talks with online boutique owner Dolapo Shobanjo and style correspondent Robin Givhan.

12:00pm

Wed December 28, 2011
Music

Filmmaker Ava DuVernay's Favorite Tunes

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we are going to stay in the world of independent films for today's addition of our occasional feature In Your Ear. That's where we ask some of the guests who've appeared in this program about the music that inspires them.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue December 27, 2011
Parenting

Tina Fey, Michelle Obama Among 2011 Powerful Moms

WorkingMother.com recently released its list of the year's most powerful moms. Michel Martin and regular parenting contributors Leslie Morgan Steiner and Jolene Ivey discuss what it takes to be a strong mom, who they admire, and who should not have been on the list. Also joining the conversation is Helen Jonsen, editor of WorkingMother.com.

12:00pm

Tue December 27, 2011
Economy

Credit Unions Booming From Anti-Bank Outrage

Originally published on Fri December 30, 2011 4:16 pm

In 2011, more than 1 million Americans moved their money into credit unions. Customers were tired of the big banks charging new fees, and the credit unions also got a big PR boost from the Occupy protesters.

"Credit unions are nonprofit cooperatives," explains Tell Me More money coach Alvin Hall. "They can't issue shares to people at all, and they are made up of a group of people who come together, basically, to try to use their money in ways that will help that group of people have easier access to credit."

Read more

12:00pm

Tue December 27, 2011
NPR Story

Hating On Congress ... Justified?

Congress' approval ratings hit an all-time low in December, according to the polling firm Gallup. Host Michel Martin looks at why many Americans seemed to be frustrated with Congress. She hears from NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving and Mark Eaton of the Capitol Steps, a musical political satire group.

12:00pm

Tue December 27, 2011
NPR Story

Big Technology A Threat To Small Businesses?

Originally published on Tue December 27, 2011 12:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to switch gears now and talk about the intersection of technology and retail. A recent Amazon.com promotion urged customers shopping in so-called brick and mortar stores to use its price check app. By scanning a bar code in the store, Amazon would give the customer a 5 percent discount, up to five dollars. Though only a small savings, the incident left a lot of local retailers, especially bookstore owners, pretty upset.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon December 26, 2011
Music

Music in 2011 Rocked, What About 2012?

If you're reminiscing over all of the great albums released in 2011, keep in mind, there's plenty to look forward to next year. Guest host Allison Keyes finds out what to keep an ear out for. She talks with two of the biggest music fans on the Tell Me More team: freelance producer, Veronica Miller, and Sarah Ventre, a freelance music journalist.

12:00pm

Mon December 26, 2011
Economy

Food Banks See Drop In Donations

Nearly 50 Americans million now live below the poverty line, according to the Census Bureau. Many food banks are not only reporting an increase in the number of people they're serving, but also a drop in food and cash donations — as much as 30 percent in some areas. Guest host Allison Keyes talks with two people working on the front lines of hunger relief.

12:00pm

Mon December 26, 2011
Children's Health

What If Your Child Says, I'm In The Wrong Body?

Dr. Norman Spack at Boston's Children's Hospital has worked with 30 transgender youth and their families to get through the difficult phases of adolescence. One treatment includes a controversial medication that blocks puberty until he or she decides whether or not to transition to the other gender. Dr. Spack talks with guest host Allison Keyes.

12:00pm

Mon December 26, 2011
U.S.

A Good Year For Gay And Lesbian Rights

Guest host Allison Keyes looks back at the victories gays and lesbians scored in 2011. Same-sex marriage was legalized in New York. And "don't ask, don't tell," the controversial ban that barred gays from serving openly in the military, was repealed. Keyes speaks with writer Kai Wright.

12:00pm

Fri December 23, 2011
NPR Story

'Earth Song' Still Inspires King Of Pop's Brother

Jermaine Jackson performed alongside his brother, Michael, in the legendary Motown group the Jackson 5. In his book, You Are Not Alone: Michael, he looks at his struggle to come to terms with his brother's death. As part of Tell Me More's series, In Your Ear, Jackson talks about the songs that continue to inspire him.

12:00pm

Fri December 23, 2011
Barbershop

Shop Talk: Obama Jumps In The Polls

The guys weigh in on President Obama's recent increase in popularity, and they look at the NBA match-ups that will kick-off the season on Christmas Day. Guest host Allison Keyes is joined by author Jimi Izrael, GOP strategist Ron Christie, The Boston Globe film critic, Wesley Morris, and Dave Zirin, sports editor at The Nation.

12:00pm

Fri December 23, 2011
NPR Story

Will Lawmakers Make Santa's Naughty Or Nice List?

After receiving an earful from Democrats and Senate Republicans, House GOP members agreed to a deal to extend unemployment benefits and a payroll tax holiday. The Republican race is also heating up in Iowa and New Hampshire. Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with former GOP National Committee chairman Michael Steele, and Joy-Ann Reid of TheGrio.com.

12:00pm

Thu December 22, 2011
Remembrances

'Barefoot Diva' Of Cape Verde Islands Dies At 70

Singer Cesaria Evora was known for winning over international audiences with the slow, somber ballads about love and sorrow from her native Cape Verde islands. She always performed barefoot as a sign of solidarity with the impoverished women of her island. Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with NPR's Felix Contreras about the life and legacy of Evora.

12:00pm

Thu December 22, 2011
Economy

Holidays And Political Gridlock Strain Unemployed

The extension on federal jobless benefits is set to expire. If no deal is reached, 2 million people will see their benefits dry up by the end of January. Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax and Vincent Brandon, who has been unemployed since March.

12:00pm

Thu December 22, 2011
Beauty Shop

Candidates' Wives Take The Lead In Campaign Ads

This week, the ladies discuss whether voters will be swayed by political ads featuring the wives of GOP presidential candidates. Plus Janet Jackson becomes the new spokeswoman for the dieting brand, Nutrisystem, and Kobe Bryant is getting divorced. Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with a diverse panel of bloggers and journalists.

12:00pm

Thu December 22, 2011
Author Interviews

Combat Canines Take On Tough Missions

The mission to capture Osama Bin Laden didn't just include a few dozen Navy Seals. A dog named Cairo played an integral part. Military dogs are often equipped with an ear bud and camera in order to be the first to enter a room and help soldiers survey the scene. Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with Lisa Rogak, author of Dogs of War.

12:00pm

Wed December 21, 2011
NPR Story

Great Books To Give Your Little Ones

A recently released children's book tells the story of how Duke Ellington brought swing to the holiday classic, 'The Nutcracker.' Also, Texan vampires go up against werewolves and were-armadillos in a popular young adult novel. These are just some of the books that top librarian Loriene Roy's list of holiday books. She speaks to host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed December 21, 2011
NPR Story

In New Album, Tori Amos Revisits Classical Roots

In the 20 years since her platinum debut album Little Earthquakes, legendary singer/songwriter Tori Amos has released 11 more studio albums and received 8 Grammy nominations. Fans have watched Amos reinvent herself and turn out hits in a range of genres. Host Michel Martin speaks with Amos about her latest album, Night of Hunters.

12:00pm

Wed December 21, 2011
NPR Story

Top Obama Advisor Makes West Wing Exit

Melody Barnes is leaving her post as director of the administration's Domestic Policy Council. Barnes was influential in crafting some of the president's major initiatives including health care and economic legislation. Host Michel Martin speaks with Barnes about her achievements and the president's popularity.

6:54pm

Tue December 20, 2011
Studio Sessions

Tori Amos Redefines The Classics In 'Night of Hunters'

Tori Amos's latest album Night of Hunters is inspired by Irish mythology.
Victor de Mello Amos Archive

Genuine, passionate, powerful — that's as much of an introduction as Tori Amos needs. But for the past two decades, she's introduced her fans to plenty. She helped turn the piano into a rock instrument, showed that she can create big hits in different genres and challenged every critic who ever tried to put her in a box. And her 12th studio album, Night of Hunters, is no different.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue December 20, 2011
NPR Story

Forget The Fads, Stick To Classic Toys

Originally published on Tue December 20, 2011 11:31 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hanukkah begins tonight, and since many people wait until the last minute to do that holiday shopping, some are probably still trying to figure out what to get for their favorite little people.

Last week, we talked about the newest electronic gifts, like this one.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMMERCIAL)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Introducing Fijit Friends, a girl's interactive best friend. Fijit Friends say more than 150 different phrases.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue December 20, 2011
NPR Story

Parents Strive To Instill A Spirit Of Giving

Three out of 4 moms consider their kids spoiled, according to a recent survey on Parenting.com. But the survey also found that most parents use the holidays as an opportunity to teach volunteerism and charity. Host Michel Martin discusses the challenges of instilling a spirit of giving with a diverse panel of moms.

12:00pm

Tue December 20, 2011
NPR Story

Do You Need Your Mailman?

Originally published on Tue December 20, 2011 11:31 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, our money coach offers some end-of-the-year advice on keeping your credit clean during and after the festive season. That's coming up. But first, if you want those holiday cards to make it in time, then you better get them in the mail soon. Today is expected to be the busiest day of the year for the U.S. Postal Service and your last chance to guarantee first-class delivery before December 25th.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue December 20, 2011
Governing

Is A Privatized Post Office Better?

Not everyone thinks the U.S. Postal Service is worth saving. Tad DeHaven of the Cato Institute says spiraling costs and uncertain revenues can be solved with privatization. Host Michel Martin and DeHaven discuss what a private postal service might look like.

12:00pm

Tue December 20, 2011
Money Coach

This New Year, Resolve To Improve Your Credit

Personal finance experts say the start of a new year is the perfect time to check your credit report. Host Michel Martin speaks with Tell Me More regular 'Money Coach' Alvin Hall about what to look for and how to boost your credit in 2012.

1:38pm

Mon December 19, 2011
Can I Just Tell You?

The Continuing Lessons Of A Bad Break

Sometimes, a helping hand can make all the different to someone in need.
istockphoto.com

Finally, since so many people have been nice enough to ask me how I am doing with my arm since I broke it a month ago, I thought I would give an update.

First, it still hurts, a lot. I don't know what I expected since the last time I broke a bone. I think I was in fourth grade and all I remember about it was how wonderful it was to be able to get the cutest boys in my class to carry my books with little more than a crook of my finger and a toss of my pigtails. This time? Well, this is a little different.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon December 19, 2011
NPR Story

What Will 'The Dear Leader's' Legacy Be?

North Korean leader Kim Jong Il died this past weekend. Host Michel Martin looks at the significance of Kim's death and what it means for the future of North Korea. She speaks with David Kang and Sandra Fahy of the Korean Studies Institute at USC.

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