Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, July 28, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) NPR's New CEO Hopes To Improve Diversity At The Network 2) In Times Of Transition, Get Practical About Your Finances 3) Iyanla Vanzant: Clarity, Forgiveness Key To Tackling Big Transitions 4) NPR CEO Appreciates The Unique Sound Of Future's 'Look Ahead'
  • Friday, July 25, 2014 4:49pm
    Stories: 1) The GOP's New Plan To Tackle Poverty: Helpful Or Hurtful? 2) Before Passing The Baton, Spelman President Reflects On Tough Choices 3) Rapping 'Ice Ice Baby,' TMM Producer Doesn't Miss A Beat 4) In A Luxury Apartment, Is A Separate 'Poor Door' Segregation?
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Effective New HIV Treatment Makes Researcher 'Hopeful' In Fighting Epidemic 2) Racially-Charged Casting Call: 'Surprising' But Not Shocking To Insiders 3) Performer Rita Moreno's Famed Career Was 'Meant To Be' 4) Erykah Badu's 'Tyrone' Gives TMM Producer Amazing Stage Presence
  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Part-Time Work, Unpredictable Schedules: What's The Fix? 2) Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking' 3) Host Michel Martin Takes Musical Cues From Directors 4) 'Traces Of Blue' Blends Jazz And Pop To Create Unique Sound
  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014 4:43pm
    Stories: 1) Tweeting From A Conflict Zone: Does It Help Or Hurt News Reporting? 2) For Pregnant Women, New Guidelines Aim To Reduce Workplace Discrimination 3) Despite Disability, One Mountain Climber Reflects On His Advantages 4) When It Comes To Other People's Kids, Should Parents Intervene?

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12:00pm

Thu February 16, 2012
Music

Grammy Winners Offer Secrets To Their Sound

For the last decade, the 26-member choir has captivated audiences including Bill Clinton and Nelson Mandela. Their blend of high energy, languages and musical traditions has won them numerous awards and a loyal fan base. They're now on a 43-city North American tour, and they stopped by for a performance chat with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Music

House Music Is My Religion, Says Professor

Author and professor Lester Spence recently spoke to Tell Me More about his book, Stare in the Darkness, which explores the influence of hip-hop music on American politics. But he says his personal playlist is made up of new and classic house tracks. He offers up his favorite cuts.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Around the Nation

Is Single Life Something To Lament Or Celebrate?

Yesterday, some singles saw Valentine's balloons and heart shaped boxes as reminders of the single life. With more Americans flying solo, how important is it to find "the one"? That's the question Ellen McCarthy set out to answer in a piece for The Washington Post Magazine. Host Michel Martin speaks with McCarthy and author Bella DePaulo.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Health

Family Planning, Chinese Zodiac Style

The recent Chinese New Year marked the start of the Year of the Dragon. Children born this year, according to the Chinese zodiac, are supposed to be smarter, stronger and more successful. That's why some Asian American parents are pulling out all the stops to get pregnant. Host Michel Martin speaks with Los Angeles Times reporter Rosanna Xia.

12:00pm

Wed February 15, 2012
Sports

Basketball Legend On Soaring Above Challenges

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is perhaps one of the greatest basketball players of all time. He recently added another chapter to his storied career when he was named U.S. Cultural Ambassador by the State Department. Host Michel Martin speaks with the author and hall-of-famer.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
NPR Story

White House Official Cecilia Munoz On Budget Plan

President Obama's $3.8 trillion budget proposal calls for spending cuts and ambitious increases in education and transportation. But critics say it is nothing more than a re-election tactic. Host Michel Martin speaks with Cecilia Munoz, Director of the Domestic Policy Council.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
NPR Story

Are The French Outdoing Americans At Parenting?

Pamela Druckerman is causing a stir with her new book titled Bringing Up Bebe. The book argues that French parents raise better-behaved children than American parents. Host Michel Martin speaks with Druckerman, as well as Mathieu Garcon, who is a French dad, and Judith Warner, who wrote the modern motherhood book titled Perfect Madness.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
NPR Story

For The Mazatec, Chocolate Not Just About Candy

The gooey goodness can be traced back hundreds of years to Mexico, where chocolate has been cherished by the indigenous Mazatec people. On Valentine's Day, host Michel Martin explores the history and spiritual significance of chocolate with mother and daughter duo, Natividad Estrada and Diana Xochitl Munn.

12:00pm

Tue February 14, 2012
Music

'The Steve Harvey Morning Show' Co-host's Playlist

Shirley Strawberry is the co-host of The Steve Harvey Morning Show and author of the relationship advice book The Strawberry Letter. As part of Tell Me More's "In Your Ear" series, she shares some of her favorite songs, including those from Maxwell, Marsha Ambrosius, CeeLo Green and Felanie Fiona.

4:37pm

Mon February 13, 2012
The Picture Show

Westminster Dog Show: Introducing The Xoloitzcuintli

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:02 am

Stewart, a Yorkshire terrier, relaxes in his hotel room after checking in at the Affinia Manhattan Hotel.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

It's that time of year — where hair dryers, treadmills and lush hotel rooms aren't reserved for us Homo sapiens, but for our canine best friends. The 136th annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is off and running this week at New York City's Madison Square Garden. Organizers say it's one of the oldest sporting events in the country, second only to the Kentucky Derby.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Race

Film Reveals "Slavery" Persisted After Civil War

Most history books teach that slavery in the U.S. ended with the Civil War, but a new documentary airing on PBS challenges that. The film, "Slavery By Another Name," explores a system of forced labor that brutalized many black Southerners up to World War II. Host Michel Martin speaks with the film's director and co-executive producer.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
Animals

Hairless Dog Loveable Or Just Ugly?

The rare hairless canine known as the xoloitzcuintli is Mexico's national dog. It's one of just six breeds to debut at this year's 2012 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Host Michel Martin speaks with xolo breeder Amy Fernandez, who is thrilled that the native dog of Mexico will be finally included in the show.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
NPR Story

Industry Remembers Pop Icon Whitney Houston

The talented but troubled singer was found unresponsive at a Los Angeles hotel on the eve of the Grammys. Debra Lee of Black Entertainment Television and music critic Steven Ivory join host Michel Martin to discuss Whitney Houston's life and legacy.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
NPR Story

A Diva Gets Her Due

The legendary singer Diana Ross was honored at Sunday's Grammys. This was Ross' first Grammy win in spite scoring a dozen nominations throughout her singing career. Host Michel Martin offers a tribute to her remarkable life and work.

12:00pm

Mon February 13, 2012
NPR Story

Tuskegee Airman Jams To Coltrane And Ellington

During World War II, Roscoe Brown served with the Tuskegee Airmen, the U.S. military's first black fighter pilots. Recently, he worked as a consultant on the film, "Red Tails," depicting their story. As part of Tell Me More's series, In Your Ear, Brown offers up his personal play list.

12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Faith Matters

Mixed Reactions To First Native American Saint

The Vatican recently announced that the 17th-century Mohawk woman, Kateri Tekakwitha, will be canonized as a Catholic saint. Many Native Americans say this is an honor, but others feel it legitimizes the abuses of colonialism. Host Michel Martin speaks with reporter Brian Bull, chair of the group, Native American Public Telecommunications.

12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Race

The High Price Of Being A Black Atheist

A group of African American humanists is running an ad campaign during February. It features historical figures, including Frederick Douglass and Langston Hughes, who they believe shared humanist values. Alix Jules is part of the campaign and he speaks with host Michel Martin about his experience as a black atheist.

12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
BackTalk

'Linsanity' Taking Knicks, NBA By Storm

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 12:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Editor Ammad Omar is here with us once again.

Ammad, what do you have for us today?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: All right, Michel. We're going to start with a women's health topic that's been in the news and we covered in our political chat on Wednesday. We talked about that decision by the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation to strip funding from Planned Parenthood and why they eventually reversed that decision.

Read more

12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Barbershop

Shop Talk: CNN Tangles With Controversy

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 12:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

Read more

12:00pm

Thu February 9, 2012
NPR Story

Conservatives Hope To Reach Hard-Pressed Youth

Young conservatives are bringing new energy to this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) with a panel called, "Why Am I Living in My Parent's Basement?" Host Michel Martin talks with two young people attending, about how they hope to bring under-30 voters to their side of the aisle.

12:00pm

Thu February 9, 2012
NPR Story

'We Are Still Awake,' Says Egyptian Protester

It's been nearly one year since Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down, and the country is still experiencing the growing pains of transition. Last year, host Michel Martin spoke with a young protester minutes after Mubarak's resignation. Now, Martin catches up with her again to see if she's still optimistic about changes in her country.

12:00pm

Thu February 9, 2012
NPR Story

Behind The Glamour, GRAMMY Controversy Brewing

During this Sunday's GRAMMY Awards, genres such as Native American, Hawaiian and Cajun music are merged into one category. The decision has caused some backlash with charges of racism and exclusion. Host Michel Martin discusses the decision with Felix Contreras, a reporter for NPR's Arts Desk and co-host of NPR Music's Alt.Latino podcast.

12:00pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Music

'Gone Already' By Faith Evans Moves RuPaul

Fierce and fashion-forward entertainer RuPaul has been famous for his drag persona for 20 years. He recently spoke to host Michel Martin about the new season of "RuPaul's Drag Race," a modeling competition for drag queens. As part of Tell Me More's series,

12:00pm

Wed February 8, 2012
Race

New TV Series Highlights Black Missing Persons

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 12:00 pm

TV One's new series Find Our Missing sheds light on the cases of people of color who have disappeared.
Courtesy of TV One

A new show on TV One puts a spotlight on missing people of color. The network, which caters to an African-American audience, hopes Find Our Missing "will put names and faces to people of color — young and old — who have disappeared without a trace," according to the website.

What's implicit in this description is that reports on missing people of color are hard to find in mainstream media, which often highlight the cases of young white women who have disappeared.

Read more

12:00pm

Wed February 8, 2012
Music

'How To Be Black' Author Offers Up His Playlist

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 1:47 pm

In his new book, writer and comedian Baratunde Thurston writes about straddling two worlds: the troubled Washington, D.C. neighborhood where he grew up, and the elite halls of Harvard, the college he attended. As part of Tell Me More's occasional series, "In Your Year," Thurston talks about the songs that move and inspire him.

12:00pm

Tue February 7, 2012
NPR Story

Applying For Financial Aid Without The Fear Factor

Application deadlines for financial aid like grants, scholarships and student loans are just around the corner. But many students may need help getting their paperwork in order. Host Michel Martin speaks with Adrianna Badillo. She's the director of Gear-Up, a program designed to guide low-income students into higher education.

12:00pm

Tue February 7, 2012
NPR Story

The Wage Gap Between Moms, Other Working Women

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 12:47 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue February 7, 2012
NPR Story

Syrian President Going Down Amid Uproar?

The U.S. faces rising tensions across the Middle East and North Africa. The U.S. Embassy in Syria recently closed as violence against dissidents continued. In Egypt, a group of Americans, including a cabinet secretary's son, is facing trial for funding pro-democracy groups. Host Michel Martin checks in with Hisham Melhem of Al-Aribiya television.

12:00pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Author Interviews

Comedian Baratunde Thurston On 'How To Be Black'

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 1:48 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

I'm Jacki Lyden and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away today.

It's Black History Month and, this year, we're observing it by digging into some of the literature that's expanded the African-American story, the memoir. African-American memoirs date as far back as the journals set down by former slaves, and these days there seems to be even more of a zeal to set out one's family history or tell a compelling personal story.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Business

Freddie Mac Good For Business, Bad For Homeowners?

An investigation by ProPublica and NPR sheds light on questionable practices by the government-owned mortgage giant Freddie Mac. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with NPR's Chris Arnold and Arturo de los Santos, who is trying to save his house.

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