Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1pm

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) A Year After Boston Marathon Bombing, How Does Public Grief Help? 2) Late On Taxes? There's A Way Out 3) Hip-Hop Dreams Lead To Penning Poetry 4) Muslim Singer Yuna Moves To John Mayer's Music 5) Teen Sexting Not So Bad?
  • Monday, April 14, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Why Do More Latina Teens Get Pregnant? 2) Getting Enough Vitamin D: More Than Milk And Sunshine 3) Is A Beating In Detroit A Hate Crime? 4) Voice Of Mavis Staples Still Inspires 5) The Latino Experience In Appalachia 6) The Dangers Of Defaulting On Student Loans
  • Friday, April 11, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Possible To Have Both Fashion And Fairness? 2) Bringing Back Freshness And Flair To The Easter Table 3) Twitter Poetry: A Little Bit Of Real Estate Says A Lot 4) Al Sharpton: Rat Or Cat?
  • Thursday, April 10, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) On 50th Anniversary Of Civl Rights, LBJ Remembered As An Opportunist? 2) Does 'Cesar Chavez' Ignore Filipino Workers? 3) Boss Says You're Smart...For A Woman 4) National Hispanic University Shutting Its Doors 5) Sex, Style And Success In 'An African City'
  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Will Disclosing Employee Information Make Wages More Equal? 2) With Free Tuition, Mich. Students Hear 'You Are Going To College' 3) Seniors Find Connection, Support In Technology 4) Embracing Atheism After A Wild Journey To Find God 5) Are Student Athletes Really Students Too? 6) Remembering A Defiant, Soaring Performance By Marian Anderson

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12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Sports

Mark Emmert: NCAA Athletes Need Respect, Not Salaries

The National Collegiate Athletic Association plans to hold college teams to higher academic standards as part of its sweeping rule changes. The NCAA will also let students get 'cost of living' cash and scholarships on a multi-year basis. NCAA President Mark Emmert speaks with host Michel Martin about the new rules, and addresses criticisms surrounding student-athlete exploitation.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Faith Matters

Church Chants 'Ride For Christ's Sake'

At Freedom Biker Church, Sunday service is less about singing traditional hymns and more about listening to rock 'n' roll at a biker rally. Preacher Mike Beasley founded the church in 2006, and since then, the network has grown to 12 churches. He speaks with Michel Martin about his vision.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
From Our Listeners

Feedback On Teen Sex, Updates On Crack

Tell Me More editor Ammad Omar and host Michel Martin comb through listener feedback from a recent conversation about teen sex, social media and the law. They give updates on new guidelines for crack sentencing and real-life superhero Phoenix Jones. They also pay tribute to Motown music director George Rountree, who died Sunday.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Barbershop

Shop Talk: 'Lynching' Used Too Freely?

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 11:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, host: I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barber Shop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are author, Jimi Izrael, civil rights attorney and author, Arsalan Iftikhar, TV and media critic, Eric Deggans, and syndicated columnist, Ruben Navarrette.

Take it away, Jimi.

JIMI IZRAEL: Thanks, Michel. Hey, fellows, welcome to the shop. How we doing?

ARSALAN IFTIKHAR: Hey, hey, hey.

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12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Food

Put Down The Fork — Lay Off The Pork

Some African-Americans have removed pork from their diets, while others proudly embrace it as a part of their culture. To hear more about the divide, host Michel Martin speaks with Natalie Moore, who wrote the essay "In Praise of Pork" for theRoot.com, and filmmaker Byron Hurt, producer of the documentary Soul Food Junkies.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Politics

Under Political Stress, Turning To Spouses

GOP presidential hopeful Herman Cain is still facing questions on whether he sexually harassed women in the 1990s. But now his wife may step up to his defense. Reports say she'll do an exclusive interview with Fox News. Host Michel Martin discusses political spouses' roles with The Washington Post Political Reporter Nia-Malika Henderson, and The Chicago-Sun Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Religion

Life Begins At Conception? Faith Leaders Debate

On November 8, Mississippi will vote on a controversial initiative that would define a fertilized egg as a person. If approved, it would effectively ban abortion, and possibly some forms of birth control. Pastor Jason Dillard says the initiative is important for preserving life. But Rev. Timothy McDonald III argues that it could harm women's health. They speak with host Michel Martin, who's also joined by NPR Correspondent Kathy Lohr.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Your Money

Young Woman Wins Fight Against Big Bank

After facing public outcry and cancelled accounts, Bank of America abandoned plans to impose a monthly five dollar fee for debit card users. Twenty-two-year-old Molly Katchpole drew in more than 300,000 signatures for her online petition drive against the bank. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed November 2, 2011
Politics

In Redistricting, Where Do 50 Million Latinos Fit?

As states across the U.S. are redrawing their district lines to account for changing populations, some groups, like the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, are pushing for majority-Latino districts. MALDEF says such districts will boost Latinos' political power, but others say it'll bring limited influence. Host Michel Martin speaks with MALDEF President Thomas Saenz and Center for Equal Opportunity Chair Linda Chavez.

12:00pm

Wed November 2, 2011
Author Interviews

Condi Rice Talks Freedom, War, Working For Bush

Former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice was among the head architects of the way America responded to the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. She was also at the center of divisive debates within the George W. Bush administration. In her new memoir No Higher Honor, she defends and explains Bush's decision to engage in war in Iraq, and shares how her work took a toll on her personal life. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

2:00pm

Tue November 1, 2011
Wisdom Watch

Michael Kahn On Directing Theater, Ditching Exams

Michael Kahn (right) directs Holly Twyford, Tracy Lynn Middendorf and Steven Culp in his 2011 production of Old Times.
Scott Suchman

Michael Kahn's theater passion sparked at a young age, and it has taken him to the highest ranks of classical theater. He's the former head of the drama division at New York's famed Juilliard School, has led theater companies in Connecticut and New Jersey, and has staged widely-acclaimed productions on- and off-Broadway. Now he's celebrating his 25 years as the artistic director of the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, D.C. — which the London-based The Economist deemed one of the world's great Shakespearean theaters.

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12:00pm

Tue November 1, 2011
Politics

Harassment Allegations Crippling Cain Campaign?

GOP presidential hopeful Herman Cain is defending himself against reports that he allegedly sexually harassed two women in the 1990s. Also, Rick Perry's staff is trying to reboot his White House bid. And are President Obama's executive orders a way for him to bypass Congress? Guest host Allison Keyes talks politics with journalists Cynthia Tucker and Mary Kate Cary.

12:00pm

Tue November 1, 2011
Your Money

Obama Lends Loan Relief To Current Students

With high tuition costs and dim job prospects, college students are increasingly struggling to make good on their loan debts. The White House recently announced changes that would make monthly payments less burdensome. Guest host Allison Keyes learns more from Mark Kantrowitz of FinAid.org and FastWeb.com.

12:00pm

Tue November 1, 2011
Economy

Holiday Job Hunters: Look Beyond Retail

Many of those seeking temporary work or extra cash may be turning to retailers this season, but they'll face stiff competition. NPR's Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax says job hunters may have better luck when submitting their applications to warehouses, Fed Ex, and similar companies. She speaks with guest host Allison Keyes.

12:00pm

Tue November 1, 2011
Beauty Shop

Beauty Shop: Student Debt, Star Divorce

This week, the Beauty Shop women discuss President Obama's plan to ease student debt, Kim Kardashian's divorce, and new marriage realities. Guest host Allison Keyes hears from NPR Digital News editor Tanya Ballard Brown, Jessica Coen with Jezebel.com, Latoya Peterson of Racialicious.com, and Danielle Belton with BlackSnob.com.

12:00pm

Mon October 31, 2011
Religion

Saint Of Death Gains Loyal Following In Mexico

As families in Mexico are preparing for Day of the Dead, shop owners are increasingly stocking their shelves with a sinister skeleton figure: Santa Muerte. She's not considered a saint by the Catholic Church, but she's still worshipped by people as diverse as middle-class housewives to narco-traffickers. Host Michel Martin discusses Santa Muerte with historian Robinson Herrera of Florida State University.

12:00pm

Mon October 31, 2011
The Impact of War

In War In Afghanistan, Missions Just For Women

Congress still bans women from serving in combat, but the U.S. Army has implemented Cultural Support Teams to foster dialogue between elite U.S. service women and Afghan women. The teams work closely with Rangers and Special Forces units during raids. Kevin Maurer recently wrote about the unit's purpose and tough selection process for The Washington Post Magazine. He speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Mon October 31, 2011
Behind Closed Doors

Teen Sex, Videos And The Law

A 14-year-old girl in Baltimore was recently videotaped performing a sexual act on a teen boy. The tape sparked heated debates about explicit online content, teen sexuality and social media. Host Michel Martin discusses the story with Laura Sessions Stepp, author of Unhooked; Malika Saada Saar, head of the Rebecca Project for Human Rights; and Brenda Joy Bernstein, a criminal attorney in private practice. ADVISORY: This conversation may not be comfortable for some listeners.

12:00pm

Fri October 28, 2011
Barbershop

Shop Talk: Cain Ad To Fire Up Or Burn Out?

In this week's Barbershop, the guys talk about GOP presidential aspirant Herman Cain's campaign video, which features his top aide smoking a cigarette. Also up for discussion: the recent recommendation that adolescent boys and young men receive the HPV vaccine. Host Michel Martin checks in with author Jimi Izrael, columnist Mario Loyola, sports reporter Pablo Torre and political science professor Lester Spence.

12:00pm

Fri October 28, 2011
Politics

Tea Party And 'Occupy': Can't They All Get Along?

The Occupy Wall Street movement is continuing to spread around the U.S., and political observers are picking up on comparisons with the conservative Tea Party movement. Richard Harwood, of the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, recently penned an article calling on the two groups to explore their common ground. Host Michel Martin speaks with Harwood, as well as Shelby Blakely of the Tea Party Patriots, and Kyle Christopher, an Occupy Wall Street participant.

12:00pm

Fri October 28, 2011
Politics

Drawing Parallels Between Tea Party And 'Occupy'

Tell Me More continues examining comparisons between the Tea Party and the Occupy Wall Street movements. Host Michel Martin is joined by Richard Harwood, founder of the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation; Shelby Blakely, citizen journalist and coordinator for the Tea Party Patriots; and Kyle Christopher, a Occupy Wall Street participant.

12:00pm

Fri October 28, 2011
Election 2012

At Ballot, Black Mormon Couple Weighs Faith, Race

With two African-American candidates and two Mormon candidates vying for the presidency, black Mormons find themselves at the political intersection of race and religion. Host Michel Martin speaks with two black members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints: Don Harwell and his wife, Jerri, who have different political viewpoints.

12:00pm

Thu October 27, 2011
Around the Nation

Mayor On Shutting Down 'Occupy Atlanta'

Originally published on Thu October 27, 2011 11:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, host: I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

A little later in the program, we'll speak with the founder of Outdoor Afro. That's a website dedicated to trying to persuade more people of color to add hiking and other outdoor adventures as vacation destinations.

But first we want to talk about that Occupy Wall Street movement that spread far beyond Wall Street to cities across the country. But as the movement has grown so have the tensions as protestors continue to occupy public spaces like parks.

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12:00pm

Thu October 27, 2011
Health

Spreading Wealth After Tough Lessons From Cancer

The new documentary The Education of Dee Dee Ricks premieres on HBO Thursday. It charts the story of a self-admitted vain white businesswoman who questions her lavish life after being diagnosed with breast cancer. She realizes how lucky she is to be able to afford treatment. This galvanizes Ricks to advocate and raise money for poor, uninsured cancer patients — many who happen to be women of color. Michel Martin speaks with Dee Dee Ricks about her personal transformation and outreach.

12:00pm

Thu October 27, 2011
Race

Taking Diversity To The Outdoors

A University of Wyoming survey finds that 78 percent of visitors to America's national parks and forests are white, compared to nine percent Hispanic and seven percent black. Rue Mapp is trying to change that. She speaks with Michel Martin about her website 'Outdoor Afro,' which aims to educate African-Americans about the importance of getting involved with the outdoors.

12:00pm

Thu October 27, 2011
Wisdom Watch

After Army, NPR ... Mel Ming Leads Sesame Street

Mel Ming tells NPR that five years from now, he hopes to bring Sesame Workshop to 50 percent of the world's children.

Courtesy of Sesame Workshop

H. Melvin Ming didn't take the easy route to become the new chief of Sesame Workshop. He started in Bermuda and went through the U.S. Army and difficult times at NPR to join the small club of black CEOs in America. Ming replaces NPR's newly hired CEO and former Sesame Workshop CEO Gary Knell.

He recently joined Tell Me More host Michel Martin for a "Wisdom Watch" conversation.


Interview Highlights

On serving in the U.S. Army

Read more

12:00pm

Thu October 27, 2011
Music

In Your Ear: Kevin Sbraga

As part of Tell Me More's occasional series "In Your Ear," restaurateur and Top Chef winner Kevin Sbraga shares some of his favorite songs. They include titles from R&B crooner John Legend and hip-hop icons Wu-Tang Clan.

12:00pm

Wed October 26, 2011
World

Criminal Deportations: Effects On U.S., Latin America

Immigration and Customs Enforcement recently announced that it deported nearly 400,000 people in fiscal year 2011, and that more than half had criminal convictions. Michel Martin learns more from Associated Press Writer Laura Wides-Munoz, and Alex Sanchez, who illegally came to the U.S. as a child and was deported after serving time in a California prison. Sanchez now legally lives in the U.S.

12:00pm

Wed October 26, 2011
NPR Story

Beauty Shop: Optional Tax, 'SlutWalk' Opposition

GOP presidential hopeful Rick Perry is proposing an optional 20 percent flat tax plan. An open letter by black women is raising concerns about the 'SlutWalk' movement, which aims to empower females. Singer Mariah Carey is getting criticism for her comment on 20/20 that she "sometimes" trusts her husband. Weighing in are the Beauty Shop women: pop culture and politics blogger Danielle Belton,U.S. News and World Report Columnist Mary Kate Cary, 'The Wise Latina Club' Blogger-in-Chief Viviana Hurtado, and TheRoot.com Reporter Cynthia Gordy.

12:00pm

Wed October 26, 2011
Arts & Life

In Trinidad, Diwali Lights Up Like Christmas

Hindus, Jains and Sikhs worldwide are celebrating the annual festival of lights today. Diwali is also a national holiday in Trinidad and Tobago, where the massive festival at the capital, Port of Spain, attracts more than 50,000 people each year. Michel Martin learns more from Ravi Maharaj, a Hindu spiritual leader and an organizer of the Trinidadian festival.

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