Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1pm

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Propronents Of Affirmative Action Losing The Battle? 2) Kansas Residents To First Lady: Stay Out 3) Can High-Quality Preschool Make A Big Difference Later On? 4) Nigerian Activist Chooses Exile Over Life In The Closet 5) Yaya Alafia's Songs Of Strength For Her Baby Boy
  • Tuesday, April 22, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Psychological Consequences Of Calling Obesity A Disease 2) Rethinking Punishment For Drug Offenders 3) Waxing Poetic About Politics And Jimmy Choos 4) 'Cuddly Toy' On Nonstop Rotation For Margaret Cho 5) Grandma Helping With The Baby: Dream Or Nightmare?
  • Monday, April 21, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) President Obama Will Skip China, But Asia Trip Sends A Message 2) A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students 3) No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home 4) Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug 5) Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-D.M.C?
  • Friday, April 18, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) 15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer? 2) To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque 3) New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays 4) Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea? 5) Should College Dropouts Be Honored By Their Alma Maters?
  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream 2) Do America's Deportation Policies Work? 3) Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court 4) You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class 5) 'Miserable' Doctors Prescribe A Different Career 6) Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?

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12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
World

Peace Prize Winner Faces Tough Re-Election Bid

Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was one of three women who were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. She is the first democratically elected female president on the African continent. While Johnson-Sirleaf enjoys broad global support, she faces growing criticism and a tough re-election campaign at home. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with foreign policy expert Emira Woods about the upcoming elections in Liberia and Johnson-Sirleaf's chances to hold onto power.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
Race

Latinos Lead Nation In Childhood Poverty

For the first time in history, whites no longer make up the single largest group of poor children in America. A new report from the Pew Hispanic Center shows that more than six million Hispanic children live in poverty. To learn more about what that means for the future of the Latino community and the nation, guest host Tony Cox speaks with Mark Lopez, co-author of the report and the associate director of the Pew Hispanic Center.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Brain Research Fuels Rethinking Of Foster Care Services

Child advocate Gary Stangler is the executive director of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. He's hoping to use research about the incomplete brain development of e18-year olds to extend services for foster children up to age 21. He and guest host Tony Cox discuss how the emerging science about brain development may affect foster care. Also joining the conversation is Sixto Cancel, a college student who's been in and out of foster care since he was 11 months old.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
NPR Story

For Obama, Good News From New Jobs Report

The economy added 103,000 jobs last month, but the unemployment rate stayed at 9.1 percent. That's according to Friday's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Friday also marks the 10-year anniversary of the war in Afghanistan. Meanwhile, Sarah Palin and Chris Christie recently announced they'd sit out of the GOP presidential race. Michel Martin talks politics with Cynthia Tucker, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, and Mindy Finn, former advisor for Mitt Romney's 2008 presidential campaign.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
NPR Story

Women's Rights Pioneers Win Nobel Peace Prize

The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winners were named Friday: Yemeni activist Tawakkul Karman, Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Liberian activist and author Leymah Gbowee. Michel Martin discusses the winners and meaning of the prize with Kristian Berg Harpviken, who follows the Nobel Committee's process closely and directs the Peace Research Institute in Oslo.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Faith Matters

Rewards, Challenges Of Converting To Judaism

Jennifer Hanin grew up Catholic, but a few years ago, she replaced her Christmas tree, lights, ornaments and fake snowman with a Menorah and shabbat candles. She's the co-author of the new book Becoming Jewish: The Challenges, Rewards, and Paths to Conversion. She talks with Michel Martin about her conversion, particularly as the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur comes at sundown today.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Barbershop

'Shop Talk': Monday Night Football Needs New Song

Civil rights hero Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, Harvard Law School's first black tenured professor Derrick Bell, and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died this week. And as ESPN decided to drop Hank Williams Junior and his song from Monday Night Football, Tell Me More media fans submitted 2000 suggestions for a new song. Weighing in on their song picks — and more news — are the Barbershop guys: author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports writer Kevin Blackistone and news writer Mario Loyola.

12:29pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Music

Latin Hip-Hop And Rap Offers Own Styles, Messages

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Tell Me More is offering a weekly series on Latin music with guests Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd, hosts of NPR Music's Alt.Latino podcast. They've been sharing new music from across Latin America and Spain.

Today, they explore Latin hip-hop and rap.

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12:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Economy

Economic Woes Changing Face Of Poverty

Among the nearly 50 million Americans living in poverty, 16 million are children. That's according to the Census Bureau. Commentator Tavis Smiley says statistics like these led him to journey on an 18-city 'poverty tour,' which he just finished. Tomorrow, he's launching a week-long series on his radio and TV programs about the tour. He tells Michel Martin about it. They also hear from Vicki Escarra, president and CEO of Feeding America, who joined Smiley for part of the poverty tour.

12:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Remembrances

Civil Rights Hero Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth Dies

Michel Martin continues her conversation with talk show host Tavis Smiley, who recently finished his 18-city 'poverty tour.' They reflect on the life of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, who died Wednesday at age 89. Rev. Shuttlesworth co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and in his fight for civil rights braved beatings and the bombing of his home.

12:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Digital Life

Did Steve Jobs Narrow Or Widen Digital Divide?

Technology pioneer and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died Wednesday at age 56. Michel Martin and technology contributor Mario Armstrong look at Jobs' legacy and review tributes to him that have come from various social media platforms and all around the world.

12:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Performing Arts

Award-Winning Performer Leslie Uggams Shares Wisdom

The singer and actress began performing at age six and was soon doing dozens of shows each week at the famed Apollo Theater. Now, nearly six decades later, Uggams has won numerous awards, and she's planning to release a new album. She talks to Michel Martin about her forthcoming album and her life in the spotlight.

12:00pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Sports

Baseball, Basketball In The Beauty Shop

NFL players are donning pink to support a league-wide campaign against breast cancer. As the WNBA finals and MLB playoffs are kicking into gear, the NBA season is halting. Michel Martin talks sports with US A Today Sports Columnist Christine Brennan, ESPN the Magazine Staff Writer Elena Bergeron, and TheWiseLatinaClub.com Blogger-in-Chief Viviana Hurtado.

12:00pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Around the Nation

For Plus-Sized Model Contest Winner, Prize Denied

When retailer American Apparel put out a call for plus-sized models, Nancy Upton entered the contest as a joke. She submitted photos of herself eating food in posed positions, and even lying in a tub full of ranch dressing. Upton won the contest. But American Apparel announced she would not be awarded the prize. Michel Martin talks with Nancy Upton about her decision to enter the contest, and the reaction from the media, the public and American Apparel.

12:00pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Arts & Life

Computer Science Major Becomes Hindu Dance Expert

Washington is hosting the Fall Festival of Indian Arts this week, which features poetry, music and a fusion of classical Indian dance with modern dance. Its founder Daniel Phoenix Singh grew up in a poor, fundamentalist Christian family in southern India and didn't see a live Indian dance performance until college. He works in IT during the day. He talks with Michel Martin about his journey into dance and his work bringing Indian dance to the U.S.

12:00pm

Wed October 5, 2011
Election 2012

Christie Out, Perry Down ... Obama An Underdog?

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie recently announced that he will not enter the White House race. Texas Governor Rick Perry's poll numbers have tumbled, especially after reports showed him and his family frequenting a hunting camp with a controversial name. President Obama's poll numbers slipped to the point where he declared himself an underdog in the 2012 election. Also, a new report gives clues as to how restrictive voter laws might impact the elections.

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12:00pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Around the Nation

'Occupy Wall Street' Protests Gain Wider Ground

More than 700 people were arrested on the Brooklyn Bridge last weekend at an 'Occupy Wall Street' protest. The movement began in New York as a reaction to what organizers call corporate greed. The demonstrations have spread to other cities like Boston, Chicago and Los Angeles. Michel Martin hears from WNYC Reporter Arun Venugopal and 'Occupy Wall Street' protestor Kyle Christopher.

12:00pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Your Money

Debit Fees Pushing Minorities Out Of Banking System?

Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Sun Trust recently announced that they will charge customers a monthly fee to use their debit cards for purchases. Some financial experts are expressing concerns that the fees will push low-income and minority customers out of the banking system. Michel Martin hears from Tell Me More's regular finance contributor Alvin Hall.

12:00pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Around the Nation

As States Cut Court Budgets, Who Pays The Price?

As many states are coping with diminished budgets, they're slashing funding to court systems. This has led to delays in traffic hearings, divorce proceedings and other issues affecting everyday Americans. Some analysts are worrying about states' abilities to dispense justice. Michel Martin speaks with Mary McQueen of the National Center for State Courts.

12:00pm

Tue October 4, 2011
Children's Health

Helping Kids Cope With Allergies

Fall means back-to-school, colder weather and allergy season. As part of Tell Me More's series on chronic conditions, the moms discuss their challenges in keeping kids with food or seasonal allergies safe. Michel Martin hears from regular contributor Jolene Ivey, nutritionist Janine Whiteson, and Dr. Ruchi Gupta, a physician at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago whose daughter has a peanut allergy.

12:00pm

Mon October 3, 2011
NPR Story

SCOTUS Cases Could Affect Presidential Race

The U.S. Supreme Court opens its 2011-2012 session Monday, in what could prove to be one of the most notable terms in years. The court is expected to hear cases about immigration, Medicaid and President Obama's landmark health care law. Michel Martin discusses the cases with George Washington University Law Professor Paul Butler and Eva Rodriguez, a Washington Post editorial writer who specializes in legal affairs.

12:00pm

Mon October 3, 2011
NPR Story

Racism Fueled Rush To Judgment Against Teen?

George Junius Stinney, Jr. was 14 years old when South Carolina executed him, making him the youngest person executed in the U.S. in the 20th century. He was convicted of murdering two girls. Now there's a move to clear his name. Host Michel Martin speaks with Frank Wu, chancellor and dean of the University of California Hastings College of the Law. Wu has been an outspoken advocate for clearing Stinney's name.

12:00pm

Mon October 3, 2011
NPR Story

Amid Extremism, Muslims Take Up Nonviolence

Radical U.S.-born cleric, Anwar al-Awlaki, was killed Friday in a U.S. drone strike in Yemen. He inspired plots to attack Americans, including the Fort Hood shooting and the 2009 Christmas plot to blow up an airplane. But author and human rights lawyer Arsalan Iftikhar says al-Awlaki represents an extreme minority, and a majority of Muslims prescribe to a peaceful side of Islam. He speaks with Michel Martin about his new book, Islamic Pacifism: Global Muslims in the Post-Osama Era..

12:00pm

Mon October 3, 2011
Movies

New HBO Film Aims To Reshape Views On Latinos

In 'The Latino List,' Emmy Award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa profiles 15 high-achieving individuals who share their struggles and triumphs as Hispanics in America. Those profiled include U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and actors America Ferrera and John Leguizamo. Hinojosa and Michel Martin discuss the film and touch upon immigration news.

12:00pm

Mon October 3, 2011
Can I Just Tell You?

Berkeley Bakes Cupcakes But No Fresh Ideas

I wanted to have a word about that cupcake sale the Berkeley College Republicans hosted last week at their school, the University of California, Berkeley. You know, the one where they priced the cupcakes differently according to who was supposedly going to buy them. According to the pricing plan the Berkeley Republicans came up with: white kids were to pay the most ($2), Native Americans the least (25 cents), with Asians, Latinos and Blacks all paying different prices in between, and women got an additional 25 cents off.

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12:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Remembrances

'Mother Of Hip-Hop' Dies At Age 75

Sylvia Robinson passed away Thursday. She was a notable producer at a time when few women were. She assembled the music group the Sugarhill Gang and released the 1979 hit, 'Rapper's Delight.' It was the first rap song to become a commercial success. Robinson also signed the famed band, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. Michel Martin reflects on Robinson's life, legacy and music.

12:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Barbershop

Barbershop: Reactions To American-Born Terrorist's Death

Al Qaeda outpost leader Anwar al-Awlaki was killed Friday in Yemen. The trial of Michael Jackson's physician began this week and testimony has intensified. Also, the Obama administration is hosting special events to honor Hispanic Heritage Month. Weighing in are the Barbershop Guys: author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, columnist Ruben Navarrette and editor Kevin Williamson.

12:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Politics

For Obama, Strained Relationship With Blacks, Hispanics?

President Obama recently said "stop complaining" in a speech to the Congressional Black Caucus, and faced tough questions from Latino journalists about the lack of progress on comprehensive immigration reform. Meanwhile, GOP presidential candidates are confronting doubts and dissent within their own ranks. Michel Martin discusses the latest politics with journalism professor Cynthia Tucker, U.S. News and World Report's Mary Kate Cary and Voto Latino's Maria Teresa Kumar.

12:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Presidential Race

In GOP White House Bid, Who's The Real Front Runner?

Michel Martin continues the political chat with journalism professor Cynthia Tucker, U.S. News and World Report's Mary Kate Cary and Voto Latino's Maria Teresa Kumar. They discuss whether Latinos will prove to be a swing voting bloc in 2012, and whether Herman Cain can sustain his momentum in the Republican presidential race.

12:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Music Interviews

'Father Of Modern Gospel' Shares His 'Journey'

Throughout his 50-year career, Andrae Crouch has released 18 albums, earned eight Grammy Awards and worked with Michael Jackson, Elton John and Madonna. He speaks with Michel Martin about his latest album, 'The Journey,' and the enduring power of gospel.

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