Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dbe1c8bbad399ea09a|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Podcasts

  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014 4:43pm
    Stories: 1) Tweeting From A Conflict Zone: Does It Help Or Hurt News Reporting? 2) For Pregnant Women, New Guidelines Aim To Reduce Workplace Discrimination 3) Despite Disability, One Mountain Climber Reflects On His Advantages 4) When It Comes To Other People's Kids, Should Parents Intervene?
  • Monday, July 21, 2014 4:33pm
    Stories: 1) Understanding The Basics Of the Conflict In Gaza 2) Could The Conflict In Ukraine Turn Into A Regional War? 3) Longtime LGBT Activist Reflects On The Early Days Of Her Advocacy 4) Phyllis Schlafly Explains Why Feminism Has Made Women Unhappy 5) Why Diversity In Tech Matters: 'People Solve Problems That They See' 6) For TMM Intern, Robert Glasper's 'Black Radio' Expands Category Of Hip-Hop
  • Friday, July 18, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) From Middle-Class To Poverty In A Mercedes 2) New Chief: NAACP Is Oldest And Best Civil Rights Organization 3) Anthony Mackie: Marvel Brings Humanity To Its Characters 4) Does Le Return Of LeBron Signal A Comeback For Cleveland?
  • Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) In Climb Up The Economic Ladder, African-Americans Getting Left Behind 2) Are White Gay Men Stealing 'Culture' From Black Women? 3) Malala Yousafzai Continues To Push For Equality And Justice 4) TMM Producer Relishes 'Fresh Attitude, Young Body'
  • Wednesday, July 16, 2014 4:33pm
    Stories: 1) Arts Program Makes Israeli And Palestinian Youth Hopeful For Future 2) Cory Booker Wants To Help Ex-Offenders Be Economically Productive 3) Does Donna Karan's Ramadan Line Border On Cultural Commodification? 4) Shared Musical Traditions Of Russia And Iran In 'East Of Melancholy' 5) TMM Senior Producer Enjoys 'Powerful Musicality' In Her Favorite Songs

Pages

12:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
World

Arab Spring Turns To Arab Autumn

Egypt's parliamentary election is continuing amid protests that are calling for an immediate power transfer from military to civilian rule. Also, in Bahrain, a report found abuses by authorities during months-long unrest. And Syria is facing economic sanctions. Host Michel Martin checks in with Abderrahim Foukara of Al Jazeera International.

12:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Africa

Journalist On Being Sexual 'Prey' In Egypt

While covering protests in Cairo last week, Egyptian-American journalist Mona Eltahawy was detained by local security forces. She says she was beaten and sexually assaulted. She recalls her experience with host Michel Martin. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Around the Nation

History Of Hazing As 'Equal Opportunity Disgrace'

The death of a Florida A&M University drum major is shedding light on a culture of hazing that extends beyond familiar organizations, such as college athletic teams, fraternities and sororities. Host Michel Martin discusses the practice of hazing with Hank Nuwer, the author of several books on the subject. He is also an associate professor of journalism at Franklin College.

11:03am

Tue November 29, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

With Help, Teens Can Manage Epilepsy

With a little help and guidance, epileptic teens can have most of the same experiences as their peers, including learning to drive.
iStockphoto.com

When Etrudy Mitchell's daughter had her first epileptic seizure at 16 months old, it started off looking like a run of the mill temper tantrum.

"We thought that she was just wanting something that she couldn't have," Mitchell tells host Michel Martin on NPR's Tell Me More. But within moments, the situation took a dramatic turn. "She turned blue. The body turned limp, and we dialed 911."

Read more

12:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
NPR Story

Violence, Fraud Fears In D. R. Congo Elections

After dictatorship and civil war, the Democratic Republic of Congo held presidential and parliamentary elections on Monday. Host Michel Martin speaks with DRC-based correspondent Jonny Hogg, and Arizona Senator John McCain's wife Cindy McCain, who is working to draw global attention to the polls and future of Africa's second largest country.

12:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
NPR Story

Navajo Code: Powerful As Any Weapon In WWII?

During World War II, the U.S. military enlisted Navajo Indians who used their native language to devise a clandestine, unbreakable code. Host Michel Martin speaks to Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo 'code talkers,' and Judith Schiess Avila, co-author of Nez' autobiography.

12:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
NPR Story

Girl Scouts About More Than Cookies, Says CEO

Girl Scouts of the USA is aiming to become the largest leadership development organization for girls. Host Michel Martin speaks with Anna Maria Chavez, who became the first person of color to lead the organization in its nearly 100-year history. Chavez discusses how to keep the Girl Scouts relevant and involve girls of all backgrounds.

12:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
Arts & Life

Kevin Clash On Bringing Elmo To Life

Sesame Street's Elmo used to sound like a caveman and he was not very fun. But when puppeteer Kevin Clash started working with the furry character, Elmo quickly became a cute and cuddly icon. Host Michel Martin speaks Clash about his experience as everyone's favorite red Muppet.

12:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
Can I Just Tell You?

Lessons From Michel Martin's Bad Break

In her weekly commentary, host Michel Martin discuses the courage of people who have endured physical and emotional pain without help or acknowledgement. Her reflection comes after an injury she had last week when ice skating.

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Around the Nation

Treatment, Not Jail, For Low Level Drug Crimes

A pilot program in Seattle, Wash., and surrounding King County allows some low-level drug offenders to go to rehabilitation programs instead of prison. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with King County's sheriff, a public defender and a member of the Seattle police department about the bi-partisan plan.

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
History

Collecting Oral Histories Of Jim Crow

Decades ago, Duke University students and professors did more than 1,000 interviews with African-Americans who lived through the Jim Crow era. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with two professors involved with the project. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening

English Prof. Helps Rewrite Student's Self Image

Friday is National Day of Listening, and this year, Story Corps is focusing on the impact teachers have made. Regular Tell Me More contributor Lester Spence speaks with his University of Michigan professor, Ralph Story, whose guidance helped him believe in his potential.

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Media

Racist History Of American News Media?

The new book News for All the People traces how mainstream publishers and broadcasters perpetuated racism through their coverage, but also how journalists of color fought to develop a more democratic, alternative press. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with the authors about their work and where the internet stands in diversifying news.

12:00pm

Fri November 25, 2011
Music

Reviving The 'Motown Of Cleveland'

The Boddie Record Company, founded by Louise Boddie and her husband was one of the first African-American owned record companies in Cleveland, Ohio. It had been relatively obscure until record collector Dante Carfagna and the Numero Group assembled a box set of the Boddie recordings. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with Carfagna and Louise Boddie.

12:00pm

Thu November 24, 2011
Your Money

On Black Friday, How To Shop But Not Drop

Americans spend more money shopping than the other 47 weeks of the year combined. It all starts on Black Friday. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with consumer credit expert John Ulzheimer about how to shop for the holidays and avoid the financial hangover.

12:00pm

Thu November 24, 2011
Arts & Life

Strict Standards At 'Harvard Of Santa Schools'

Some may think that working as Santa Claus at the mall is easy, but a shabby red suit and cheap fake beard don't cut it for teachers at the Charles W. Howard Santa School. The school seeks students with outstanding morals and the motivation to make each interaction with children magical. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with owners Tom and Holly Valent.

12:00pm

Thu November 24, 2011
Music

Encore: From Mary Mary, 'Something Big'

With their uplifting lyrics and blend of different genres, award-winning duo Mary Mary has reigned over the modern gospel scene for more than a decade. In this encore broadcast, host Michel Martin speaks with sisters Erica and Tina Campbell about faith, music and the inspiration behind their latest album Something Big.

12:00pm

Thu November 24, 2011
On Aging

What Elders Know That The Rest Of Us Don't

Karl Pillemer's new book 30 Lessons for Living results from an effort to collect wisdom from more than 1,200 older Americans. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with Pillemer and Helene Rosenblatt, one of the elders featured in the book, about what we can learn from our elders and why we don't listen to them more often.

12:00pm

Wed November 23, 2011
NPR Story

Shop Talk: Praying Kicks Off NFL Controversy

The Barbershop guys preview the upcoming football games and discuss whether Tim Tebow of the Denver Broncos distracts other players when praying on the field. The guys also share their Thanksgiving gratitude lists. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports editor Dave Zirin and sports reporter Pablo Torre.

12:00pm

Wed November 23, 2011
NPR Story

After 15 Years In Prison, Hope For Chicagoans

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 10:56 am

Transcript

TONY COX, HOST:

I'm Tony Cox and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, award-winning chef Jose Andre stops by to share his Thanksgiving favorites, but first we take a look at crime and punishment in the United States. Since 2000, DNA evidence has helped exonerate 213 individuals convicted of crimes. Since the first DNA exoneration in 1989, seventeen people had their convictions overturned after serving time on death row. That's according to the Innocence Project, an organization that works to overturn wrongful convictions.

Read more

12:00pm

Wed November 23, 2011
NPR Story

Behind The Scenes: Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 10:56 am

Since 1924, millions of Americans have been watching Macy's iconic parade as they ring in the holiday season. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with parade executive producer Amy Kule, who shares some of her favorite performances and reveals what it takes to coordinate more than 8,000 participants on that day.

12:30pm

Tue November 22, 2011
Food

A Sweet, Southern Thanksgiving Treat From B. Smith

One of B. Smith's signature treats is this Bourbon Street Bread Pudding.
Bridget De Chagas NPR

As Thanksgiving approaches, you can almost smell and taste the turkey, buttered collard greens and soft corn bread stuffing. As a pre-feast treat, Tell Me More guest host Tony Cox visits a woman whose name to many is synonymous with fine Southern cuisine and entertaining: Barbara Smith, also known as B. Smith.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue November 22, 2011
Law

Imminent Changes To Alabama Immigration Law?

Some GOP lawmakers in Alabama say that changes to the state's immigration law may be necessary. They're considering tweaking the provision that makes it a crime for Alabama residents to lend charitable aid to anyone who is illegally in the state. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with John Archibald of Birmingham News.

12:00pm

Tue November 22, 2011
World

Promising Drought Relief In Somalia Threatened?

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 12:03 pm

Transcript

TONY COX, HOST:

I'm Tony Cox and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. In a moment, are you fretting over college applications? We'll have some advice for parents and students on how to navigate through those essays and financial aid options.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue November 22, 2011
Around the Nation

Unintended Consequences Of Alabama Immigration

Originally published on Tue November 22, 2011 12:03 pm

Transcript

TONY COX, HOST:

I'm Tony Cox and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, a severe drought in the Horn of Africa has claimed thousands of lives this year and it has also brought millions to the brink of starvation. But now, the United Nations is saying efforts to alleviate the disaster are finally paying off. We will get the latest from on the ground in Somalia in just a few moments. But first, we go to Alabama, the state that has supplanted Arizona as ground zero of the immigration debate.

Read more

12:00pm

Tue November 22, 2011
Education

Advice For College Applicants And Their Families

As thousands prepare recommendation letters, essays and financial aid forms, guest host Tony Cox gets advice on how parents and students can succeed in navigating the college admissions process. Cox speaks with Joy St. John, director of admission at Wellesley College.

12:00pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Politics

Gingrich Takes GOP Lead, Takes On 'Occupy'

A new poll says Newt Gingrich is the front-runner of the GOP presidential primary race. How did his popularity surge, and what are chances of him winning? Meanwhile, 'Occupy' organizers are trying to harness their political power amid tougher responses from police. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with journalists Cynthia Tucker and Mary Kate Cary.

12:00pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Health

Fighting Over Rights Of Sperm Donor Babies

Many children born through donor insemination may never meet their fathers or know that they have numerous half siblings. Guest host Tony Cox explores the renewed debate over regulating reproductive services and the issues facing donors and their offspring. He hears from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Donor Sibling Registry.

12:00pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Law

Using Donated Sperm: What Does The Law Say?

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 12:04 pm

Transcript

TONY COX, HOST:

For a legal perspective now on the reproductive medicine industry, we turn to Naomi Cahn. She is a professor of law at the George Washington University, specializing in family law and reproductive technology. She is also the author of the book, "Test Tube Families: Why the Fertility Market Needs Legal Regulation."

Professor Cahn, nice to have you.

NAOMI CAHN: Thank you very much.

Read more

12:00pm

Mon November 21, 2011
Music

After 20 Years, No End Of The Road For Boyz II Men

Nathan Morris (left), Wanya Morris (center) and Shawn Stockman (right) are Boyz II Men.
Amy Ta NPR

Boyz II Men members Nathan Morris, Wanya Morris, Shawn Stockman and former member Michael McCary began cementing themselves in R&B history in 1991. Their single "Motownphilly" became a hit and was followed by a series of other chart-topping songs. The group has earned four Grammy Awards, performed around the world and sold tens of millions of albums.

Their latest album, Twenty, features 10 new songs and 10 past hits. It marks their two decades of entertaining a generation of loyal fans.

Read more

Pages