Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f6dbe1c8bbad399ea09a|5187f6c5e1c8bbad399ea079

Podcasts

  • Friday, July 25, 2014 4:49pm
    Stories: 1) The GOP's New Plan To Tackle Poverty: Helpful Or Hurtful? 2) Before Passing The Baton, Spelman President Reflects On Tough Choices 3) Rapping 'Ice Ice Baby,' TMM Producer Doesn't Miss A Beat 4) In A Luxury Apartment, Is A Separate 'Poor Door' Segregation?
  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Effective New HIV Treatment Makes Researcher 'Hopeful' In Fighting Epidemic 2) Racially-Charged Casting Call: 'Surprising' But Not Shocking To Insiders 3) Performer Rita Moreno's Famed Career Was 'Meant To Be' 4) Erykah Badu's 'Tyrone' Gives TMM Producer Amazing Stage Presence
  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Part-Time Work, Unpredictable Schedules: What's The Fix? 2) Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking' 3) Host Michel Martin Takes Musical Cues From Directors 4) 'Traces Of Blue' Blends Jazz And Pop To Create Unique Sound
  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014 4:43pm
    Stories: 1) Tweeting From A Conflict Zone: Does It Help Or Hurt News Reporting? 2) For Pregnant Women, New Guidelines Aim To Reduce Workplace Discrimination 3) Despite Disability, One Mountain Climber Reflects On His Advantages 4) When It Comes To Other People's Kids, Should Parents Intervene?
  • Monday, July 21, 2014 4:33pm
    Stories: 1) Understanding The Basics Of the Conflict In Gaza 2) Could The Conflict In Ukraine Turn Into A Regional War? 3) Longtime LGBT Activist Reflects On The Early Days Of Her Advocacy 4) Phyllis Schlafly Explains Why Feminism Has Made Women Unhappy 5) Why Diversity In Tech Matters: 'People Solve Problems That They See' 6) For TMM Intern, Robert Glasper's 'Black Radio' Expands Category Of Hip-Hop

Pages

12:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
NPR Story

Latin Grammys: Classy Vibe And Winning Calle 13

Thursday's Latin Grammy Awards featured more than 6,000 entries across 46 categories. Puerto Rican rap duo Calle 13 won nine out of 10 nominations, and Shakira won "Person of the Year." Host Michel Martin discusses highlights with Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd, hosts of NPR Music's Alt-Latino podcast.

12:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
NPR Story

Jury Of Listeners Oppose Judge Hitting His Teen

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 12:02 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now, it's time for BackTalk, where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere and get to hear from you, our listeners. Ammad Omar is with me. He's an editor here at TELL ME MORE. Welcome back, Ammad.

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Thanks, Michel.

MARTIN: Now, I understand that our parenting conversation this week got quite a response.

Read more

12:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
NPR Story

Shop Talk: Scandals Hit Penn State, Herman Cain

The Barbershop guys weigh in on the Penn State scandal, Rick Perry's debate flub, and Herman Cain's handling of sexual harassment accusations. Host Michel Martin hears from former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele, as well as author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar and sports reporter Pablo Torre.

12:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Race

1st Black Marines: Fighting For The Right To Fight

In 1942, the first black recruits allowed in the Marines trained at a facility in North Carolina called Montford Point. They're being awarded a Congressional Gold Medal. But at first, the U.S. didn't want them fighting. Host Michel Martin speaks with the head of the Montford Point Marines Association, and 90-year-old former Marine James Rudolf Carter.

12:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Art & Design

Kevan Hall On Why Fashion Matters In Tough Times

Kevan Hall stands with his models at the Frank Sinatra Fashion Show in February. The designer has dressed A-listers and won multiple awards.
Gerry Maceda

If you pay attention to the Emmys and Academy Awards, then you've probably seen those glamorous, haute couture gowns made by Kevan Hall. He's known for dressing A-listers like Vanessa Williams, Salma Hayek, Celine Dion — even first lady Michelle Obama.

Read more

12:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Penn State Sex Abuse Scandal Really About Football?

Legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired on Wednesday. Critics said he should have done more to address charges of child sex abuse that came to his attention. Penn State students staged violent protests after the announcement. Host Michel Martin speaks with USA Today Sports Columnist Christine Brennan and NPR Sports Correspondent Mike Pesca about the abuse case, firing, and 84-year-old Paterno's legacy.

12:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Business

Students Skip Job Search, Seek Entrepreneurship

A growing number of students are forgoing traditional careers to launch their own businesses. For many of them, social change is just as important as their bottom line. Amy Reinink recently wrote about this for The Washington Post Magazine. Host Michel Martin speaks with Reinink and James Li, an entrepreneur and Georgetown University student.

12:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Television

'All-American Muslim' Carves Path To TLC

A new reality TV show debuting Sunday aims to shed light on a group of Americans who often feel misunderstood as they juggle nationality and faith. All-American Muslim focuses on five families in Dearborn, Mich., which is of the most established and largest communities of Muslim Americans in the U.S. Suehaila Amen, who's featured on the show, speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Thu November 10, 2011
Art & Design

Iraqi Designer's Vision: Covered, Still Sexy

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:16 am

Hana Sadiq has dressed Queen Noor and Queen Rania of Jordan.
Courtesy of Hana Sadiq

Renowned Iraqi fashion designer Hana Sadiq has dressed both Queen Noor and Queen Rania of Jordan, as well as members of the royal families of Saudi Arabia.

For the past 25 years, Sadiq has shown her collections throughout the Middle East and Europe. Thursday night, she wraps up her first tour of the United States with an event at Washington, D.C.'s historic Lincoln Theatre. It's called "Turaath — A Celebration of Arab Culture in America," and it's sponsored by the American Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee.

Read more

12:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
History

Mother Recalls Her Perilous Freedom Ride

Scores of civil rights activists faced violence and arrests when traveling into the heart of the segregated South as "Freedom Riders" in 1961. Theresa Walker, one of the few women and very few mothers who braved that journey, is being honored Wednesday by the National Women's Law Center. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
Music

Sound And Fury Of Protest Movements

Music has long been used as a call for change. What is the history of music as political discourse, and is an anthem brewing for some of today's protest movements? Host Michel Martin hears from Dorian Lynskey, author of 33 Revolutions Per Minute: A History of Protest Songs, From Billie Holiday to Green Day.

12:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
Remembrances

Legendary Rapper Heavy D Dies At 44

The self-proclaimed "overweight lover" of hip-hop rose to fame in the late 1980s, often making his weight the center of his act. He was part of the group "Heavy D and the Boyz." He died Tuesday in Los Angeles. Host Michel Martin looks at the life and work of the Jamaica-born hip-hop star.

12:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
Politics

Winners, Losers From Off-Year Elections

On Tuesday, two GOP-backed measures were struck down: Mississippi's amendment that would've defined fertilization as the start of life, and Ohio's measure to uphold a law curbing collective bargaining rights for public workers. Host Michel Martin explores what these results might mean for the 2012 elections. She speaks with former Obama administration staffer Corey Ealons and GOP strategist Ron Christie.

12:00pm

Wed November 9, 2011
World

Nobel Peace Prize Winner Faces Electoral Boycott

The low voter turnout at Tuesday's run-off election in Liberia was preceded by violent clashes. Opposition leader Winston Tubman refused to participate in the vote, so there was no rival candidate for incumbent President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Africa's first democratically elected female head of state. Host Michel Martin discusses the vote's impact on Liberia's post-civil war recovery with journalist Ledgerhood Rennie.

12:00pm

Tue November 8, 2011
NPR Story

U.S. Joins Hunt For Brutal Warlord In Africa

The Obama administration recently dispatched 100 special forces to Uganda to help pursue Joseph Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army. Throughout the last three decades, Kony and LRA fighters have been accused of torturing civilians and recruiting child soldiers. Host Michel Martin speaks with former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Jendayi Frazer.

12:00pm

Tue November 8, 2011
Around the Nation

Justice Served Through Conrad Murray Verdict?

Dr. Murray, personal physician to the late Michael Jackson, was recently found guilty of involuntary manslaughter. Host Michel Martin discusses the verdict and lessons learned with Loyola Law School Professor Laurie Levenson and music and culture journalist Steven Ivory.

12:00pm

Tue November 8, 2011
Remembrances

Sugar Ray Leonard Remembers Joe Frazier

Fraizer, the former world heavyweight boxing champion, was known for his crushing left hook, a career of 32 wins and four losses, and his rivalry with Muhammad Ali. Frazier recently died after a fight with liver cancer. Host Michel Martin discusses his life and legacy with Stiffjab.net editor Gautham Nagesh and boxing great Sugar Ray Leonard.

12:00pm

Tue November 8, 2011
Parenting

Judge Beats His Daughter ... Abuse Or Discipline?

Texas family law judge William Adams was recently caught on video beating his then 16-year-old daughter. Some applaud Adams while others are horrified. Host Michel Martin hears from regular parenting contributors Leslie Morgan Steiner, Dani Tucker and Jolene Ivey, as well as SpareTheKids.com creator Stacey Patton. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

5:14pm

Mon November 7, 2011
Around the Nation

Unrest Boils Over Ohio Collective Bargaining Law

Ohioans will go to the polls on Tuesday, and their votes could overturn a controversial law that limits collective bargaining rights for public employees. The original law was signed by the Buckeye State's Republican Gov. John Kasich earlier this year. Host Michel Martin discusses the referendum with Jason Johnson, professor of political science at Ohio's Hiram College.

3:01pm

Mon November 7, 2011
Author Interviews

Indigo: The Indelible Color That Ruled The World

Catherine McKinley is the author of Indigo: In Search of the Color that Seduced the World.
Courtesy Of The Author

You probably take the blue in your favorite jeans or denim bean bag chair for granted now, but it was once prized by slave traders, spiritual leaders, royalty and rag traders alike.

A decade ago, Catherine McKinley embarked on a trip through nine West African countries, armed with a fellowship and her fascination for the blue dye. She tells her story in her book Indigo: In Search of the Color that Seduced the World.

The History of Indigo

Read more

12:00pm

Mon November 7, 2011
NPR Story

In Politics: Elections, Herman Cain, Young Voters

Kentucky's gubernatorial race and Mississippi's personhood amendment are gaining wide attention as some states are observing election day on Tuesday. Also, Herman Cain is continuing to defend himself against sexual harassment charges. And can President Obama rally young voter support like he did four years ago? Host Michel Martin hears from Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Cynthia Tucker and U.S. News and World Report Columnist Mary Kate Cary.

12:00pm

Mon November 7, 2011
NPR Story

Will New I.D. Laws Turn Away Some Voters?

This year, seven states have passed new, tighter voter I.D. laws. Supporters say they protect the integrity of elections, but critics say they could keep minorities and poor people from voting. Host Michel Martin hears both sides of the issue with law professor Spencer Overton and the Heritage Foundation's Hans von Spakovsky.

12:00pm

Mon November 7, 2011
NPR Story

Unrest Boils Over Ohio Collective Bargaining Law

On Tuesday, Ohioans will vote on a controversial law that limits collective bargaining rights for public employees. Signed earlier this year by the state's governor, the law also requires those employees to contribute more for their health and retirement benefits. Now union members are trying to repeal the law. Host Michel Martin speaks with Hiram College Professor of Political Science Jason Johnson.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Sports

Mark Emmert: NCAA Athletes Need Respect, Not Salaries

The National Collegiate Athletic Association plans to hold college teams to higher academic standards as part of its sweeping rule changes. The NCAA will also let students get 'cost of living' cash and scholarships on a multi-year basis. NCAA President Mark Emmert speaks with host Michel Martin about the new rules, and addresses criticisms surrounding student-athlete exploitation.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Faith Matters

Church Chants 'Ride For Christ's Sake'

At Freedom Biker Church, Sunday service is less about singing traditional hymns and more about listening to rock 'n' roll at a biker rally. Preacher Mike Beasley founded the church in 2006, and since then, the network has grown to 12 churches. He speaks with Michel Martin about his vision.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
From Our Listeners

Feedback On Teen Sex, Updates On Crack

Tell Me More editor Ammad Omar and host Michel Martin comb through listener feedback from a recent conversation about teen sex, social media and the law. They give updates on new guidelines for crack sentencing and real-life superhero Phoenix Jones. They also pay tribute to Motown music director George Rountree, who died Sunday.

12:00pm

Fri November 4, 2011
Barbershop

Shop Talk: 'Lynching' Used Too Freely?

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 11:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, host: I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barber Shop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are author, Jimi Izrael, civil rights attorney and author, Arsalan Iftikhar, TV and media critic, Eric Deggans, and syndicated columnist, Ruben Navarrette.

Take it away, Jimi.

JIMI IZRAEL: Thanks, Michel. Hey, fellows, welcome to the shop. How we doing?

ARSALAN IFTIKHAR: Hey, hey, hey.

Read more

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Religion

Life Begins At Conception? Faith Leaders Debate

On November 8, Mississippi will vote on a controversial initiative that would define a fertilized egg as a person. If approved, it would effectively ban abortion, and possibly some forms of birth control. Pastor Jason Dillard says the initiative is important for preserving life. But Rev. Timothy McDonald III argues that it could harm women's health. They speak with host Michel Martin, who's also joined by NPR Correspondent Kathy Lohr.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Your Money

Young Woman Wins Fight Against Big Bank

After facing public outcry and cancelled accounts, Bank of America abandoned plans to impose a monthly five dollar fee for debit card users. Twenty-two-year-old Molly Katchpole drew in more than 300,000 signatures for her online petition drive against the bank. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Food

Put Down The Fork — Lay Off The Pork

Some African-Americans have removed pork from their diets, while others proudly embrace it as a part of their culture. To hear more about the divide, host Michel Martin speaks with Natalie Moore, who wrote the essay "In Praise of Pork" for theRoot.com, and filmmaker Byron Hurt, producer of the documentary Soul Food Junkies.

Pages