Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Friday, August 1, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Is The Current Gridlock In Congress As Bad As It Looks? 2) For Ray Rice, Is A Two-Game Suspension Light Punishment? 3) Rabbi: During Transition, Look Back On Accomplishments 4) Marcus Johnson Trio Offers A Musical Treat For TMM's Final Show 5) Before Final Sign Off, Michel Martin Challenges Listeners To 'Tell Me More'
  • Thursday, July 31, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) 'Africa Is Champion': Reporting From A Changing Continent 2) Mexican Journalist Hopes His Reporting Can 'Bridge The Gap' 3) Despite Progress Of LGBT Rights In U.S., Challenges Remain Abroad 4) Playing 'Crazy Eyes' Taught Actress 'It's OK To Be Just You' 5) Ghanaian Rapper Hopes To Take His 'Afropolitan Dreams' Back Home
  • Wednesday, July 30, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Former CNN Anchor Bernard Shaw Kept Cool, But Paid The Price Of Success 2) Beauty Shop Ladies Weigh In On The Importance Of Mentors 3) When Searching For Mentors, Look 'Beyond Race' 4) Making Space For People Who Are Out Of the Spotlight
  • Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:43pm
    Stories: 1) Poet Nikki Giovanni On Change: 'Approach It With A Smile' 2) Where Do Dads Go For Parenting Advice? 3) After 7 Years, Moms Panelists Share How They've Changed
  • Monday, July 28, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) NPR's New CEO Hopes To Improve Diversity At The Network 2) In Times Of Transition, Get Practical About Your Finances 3) Iyanla Vanzant: Clarity, Forgiveness Key To Tackling Big Transitions 4) NPR CEO Appreciates The Unique Sound Of Future's 'Look Ahead'

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12:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
World

'The Learning': Social Costs Of Teaching Abroad

In the new film The Learning, four teachers leave their close families in the Philippines to work in Baltimore, where wages are up to 25 times higher than what's offered at home. They persist to overcome cultural differences, bring order to classrooms and form meaningful bonds with American students. The film reflects a shift in education — a century ago, Americans set up schools in the Philippines, but U.S. has now been recruiting Filipinos to teach in the states. Michel Martin hears from director Ramona Diaz.

12:00pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Music

In Your Ear: Jay Holcey

As part of Tell Me More's occasional series "In Your Ear," NPR member station WVAS Music Director Jay Holcey shares his favorite tunes. That includes "Grandma's Hands" by Bill Withers and "Falling in Love with Jesus" by Kirk Whalum.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
History

Marches On Washington Still Making A Difference?

Thousands are expected to attend Rev. Al Sharpton's march for jobs and justice Saturday on the National Mall. The rally is scheduled a day before the dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. The nation's capital has been historically commonplace for hosting marches that express views ranging from women's equality to anti-war and animal rights. Michel Martin explores the history and the impact of marches on Washington with NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving and University of Pennsylvania History Professor Mary Frances Berry.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Faith Matters

The Sikh Religion, Through The Camera Lens

The 8th Annual Sikh International Film Festival is a two-day event that aims to raise awareness about the Sikh faith and community. Despite tens of thousands of adherents living in the U.S., Americans know very little about the faith, and often associate Sikhs with Muslims. Michel Martin speaks with film festival chair Paul Johar.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Arts & Life

Comic Conventions Not Just For Nerds

People from across the country are gathering at the 2011 New York Comic Con to share their love of comics, anime, games, graphic novels and more. Michel Martin gets the dish on this year's event from Latoya Peterson, editor of the blog Racialicious.com and an anime fan who's attending the convention.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
BackTalk

Listeners Weigh In On 'Tanning Of America'

Host Michel Martin and Tell Me More Editor Ammad Omar comb through listener feedback on this week's segment about Steve Stoute's new book that explores hip-hop's influence on big business. They also discuss updates to the Cherokee Nation election, the elections in Liberia and a new development for 'Real Life Super Hero' Phoenix Jones.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Barbershop

'Shop Talk': Tea Party Battles 'Occupy Wall Street'

GOP presidential hopeful Herman Cain surges to the top of the polls. The Tea Party is launching a counter-offensive against the Occupy Wall Street movement. And Detroit sports teams are enjoying exceptional seasons. Weighing in are the Barbershop guys: author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, columnist Ruben Navarratte and political science professor Lester Spence.

12:00pm

Thu October 13, 2011
Health

Black Doctors: On Prostate Screening Controversy

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force recently said that prostate cancer screenings don't save lives, and recommends that healthy men should not get prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood tests. Dr. Compton Benjamin, a urologist at George Washington University, argues that the PSA provides the best insight into whether a patient may have prostate cancer. But Dr. Otis Brawley of the American Cancer Society says the PSA is overused and usually inconclusive. Both speak with Michel Martin. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Thu October 13, 2011
Health

Landmark Book On Women's Sexuality Turns 40

Our Bodies, Ourselves turns 40 years old this year, and the new edition includes the latest data on safer sex, body image, local and global activism, changes to the health care system and more. Judy Norsigian co-authored the first edition and every edition since. Christine Cupaiuolo and Jamia Wilson worked on the latest edition. All three speak with Michel Martin. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Thu October 13, 2011
Movie Interviews

Bichir Earns Oscar Buzz For Illegal Immigrant Role

Nearly 11 million illegal immigrants live in the U.S., hoping to get a piece of the American dream. Mexican-born actor Demian Bichir brings to light their experiences in his new film A Better Life. He plays an undocumented gardener who tries providing a better life for his American-born teenage son. Bichir talks with Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Politics

In Politics: Economy, Jobs And 'Occupy The Hood'

GOP presidential hopefuls focused on the U.S. economy in their debate Tuesday. The same day, President Obama's $447 billion jobs plan failed to advance in the Senate as Democrats did not produce the 60 votes needed to allow debate on the bill. And as the Occupy Wall Street movement continues, a group called Occupy the Hood is emerging in Detroit to get more blacks and Latinos to join the Occupy protests. Michel Martin talks with Washington Post Political Reporter Perry Bacon Jr. and WDET News Director Jerome Vaughn.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Technology

India's $35 Tablet To Bridge The Digital Divide?

The Indian government recently launched the world's cheapest tablet computer, which will be sold to students at a subsidized price. Michel Martin speaks with Columbia University Digital Media Professor Sree Sreenivasan about whether the world's largest democracy — with more than half its population living below the poverty line — can bridge the digital divide.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Author Interviews

Helping Marriages Go The Distance

The new book, 'I Do ... Every Day: Words of Wisdom for Newlyweds, and Not So Newlyweds' offers common sense advice and surprising tips for maintaining healthy marriages. Journalist Cynthia Bond Hopson and Reverend Roger Hopson write from experience — they've been happily married for 35 years, with two children and four grandchildren. They speak with host Michel Martin about their book, marriage and advice for couples.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Music

When Electronica Meets Folk ... A Dance Craze

Tell Me More's celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month and the music of Latin America wraps up this week. The hosts of NPR's Alt. Latino podcast, Jasmine Garsd and Felix Contreras, talk about the unusual mix of electronica and folk. They listen to these blended tracks and styles from Colombia and Argentina.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Race

Debunking Black Marriage Myths

A recent article in Empower magazine says that media and popular opinion are too pessimistic when analyzing the success of black couples. Ivory Toldson, a senior research analyst for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, says he crunched the numbers and found fallacies in the negative stereotypes associated with black courtship and marriage. He speaks with Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Tue October 11, 2011
Around the Nation

Tough, New Immigration Law Fuels Ala. Exodus

Transcript

TONY COX, host: Now, for more on how the Alabama immigration law is impacting the state we turn to John Archibald. He is a Metro columnist for the Birmingham News. John, thanks for coming on.

JOHN ARCHIBALD: My pleasure, Tony.

COX: So, we just heard from the mayor of Albertville. You got to hear him as well. Do his statements on the immigration law align with how the law is being viewed statewide in your opinion?

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12:00pm

Tue October 11, 2011
Author Interviews

How Hip-Hop Has Revolutionized Marketing

Transcript

TONY COX, host: But first, our next guest is a marketing expert who's worked with cultural icons like Jay-Z, Allen Iverson, Mary J. Blige and LL Cool J, among many others. He's recently written about how the hip-hop generation and hip-hop culture have revolutionized big business. It's a phenomenon that's been evolving for more than a quarter century, but one of the early marriages of hip-hop and the industry can be traced back to this classic 1986 song.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MY ADIDAS")

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12:00pm

Tue October 11, 2011
Around the Nation

Parents Playing Favorites ... Inevitable?

iStockphoto.com

When it comes to favoring one child over another, most parents will fervently deny that they do it, while others say it's inevitable. Here's what Tell Me More's parenting panel says about the issue.

Jeffrey Kluger is the author of Time's recent cover story "Playing Favorites" and the book The Sibling Effect.

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12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
Race

Latinos Lead Nation In Childhood Poverty

For the first time in history, whites no longer make up the single largest group of poor children in America. A new report from the Pew Hispanic Center shows that more than six million Hispanic children live in poverty. To learn more about what that means for the future of the Latino community and the nation, guest host Tony Cox speaks with Mark Lopez, co-author of the report and the associate director of the Pew Hispanic Center.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Brain Research Fuels Rethinking Of Foster Care Services

Child advocate Gary Stangler is the executive director of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. He's hoping to use research about the incomplete brain development of e18-year olds to extend services for foster children up to age 21. He and guest host Tony Cox discuss how the emerging science about brain development may affect foster care. Also joining the conversation is Sixto Cancel, a college student who's been in and out of foster care since he was 11 months old.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
Brain Candy

Brain Maturity Extends Well Beyond Teen Years

Under most laws, young people are recognized as adults at age 18. But emerging science about brain development suggests that most people don't reach full maturity until the age 25. Guest host Tony Cox discusses the research and its implications with Sandra Aamodt, neuroscientist and co-author of the book Welcome to Your Child's Brain.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
History

Think You Know The Real Christopher Columbus?

Columbus Day is a national holiday, celebrated with parades and songs. While most Americans know that Columbus sailed the ocean blue, many of the facts surrounding the voyage remain misunderstood. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with historian William Fowler to set the record straight on some of the popular myths surrounding Christopher Columbus and his voyage.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
World

Peace Prize Winner Faces Tough Re-Election Bid

Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was one of three women who were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. She is the first democratically elected female president on the African continent. While Johnson-Sirleaf enjoys broad global support, she faces growing criticism and a tough re-election campaign at home. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with foreign policy expert Emira Woods about the upcoming elections in Liberia and Johnson-Sirleaf's chances to hold onto power.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
NPR Story

For Obama, Good News From New Jobs Report

The economy added 103,000 jobs last month, but the unemployment rate stayed at 9.1 percent. That's according to Friday's report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Friday also marks the 10-year anniversary of the war in Afghanistan. Meanwhile, Sarah Palin and Chris Christie recently announced they'd sit out of the GOP presidential race. Michel Martin talks politics with Cynthia Tucker, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, and Mindy Finn, former advisor for Mitt Romney's 2008 presidential campaign.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
NPR Story

Women's Rights Pioneers Win Nobel Peace Prize

The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winners were named Friday: Yemeni activist Tawakkul Karman, Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Liberian activist and author Leymah Gbowee. Michel Martin discusses the winners and meaning of the prize with Kristian Berg Harpviken, who follows the Nobel Committee's process closely and directs the Peace Research Institute in Oslo.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Faith Matters

Rewards, Challenges Of Converting To Judaism

Jennifer Hanin grew up Catholic, but a few years ago, she replaced her Christmas tree, lights, ornaments and fake snowman with a Menorah and shabbat candles. She's the co-author of the new book Becoming Jewish: The Challenges, Rewards, and Paths to Conversion. She talks with Michel Martin about her conversion, particularly as the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur comes at sundown today.

12:00pm

Fri October 7, 2011
Barbershop

'Shop Talk': Monday Night Football Needs New Song

Civil rights hero Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, Harvard Law School's first black tenured professor Derrick Bell, and Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died this week. And as ESPN decided to drop Hank Williams Junior and his song from Monday Night Football, Tell Me More media fans submitted 2000 suggestions for a new song. Weighing in on their song picks — and more news — are the Barbershop guys: author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports writer Kevin Blackistone and news writer Mario Loyola.

12:29pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Music

Latin Hip-Hop And Rap Offers Own Styles, Messages

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Tell Me More is offering a weekly series on Latin music with guests Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd, hosts of NPR Music's Alt.Latino podcast. They've been sharing new music from across Latin America and Spain.

Today, they explore Latin hip-hop and rap.

Read more

12:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Economy

Economic Woes Changing Face Of Poverty

Among the nearly 50 million Americans living in poverty, 16 million are children. That's according to the Census Bureau. Commentator Tavis Smiley says statistics like these led him to journey on an 18-city 'poverty tour,' which he just finished. Tomorrow, he's launching a week-long series on his radio and TV programs about the tour. He tells Michel Martin about it. They also hear from Vicki Escarra, president and CEO of Feeding America, who joined Smiley for part of the poverty tour.

12:00pm

Thu October 6, 2011
Remembrances

Civil Rights Hero Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth Dies

Michel Martin continues her conversation with talk show host Tavis Smiley, who recently finished his 18-city 'poverty tour.' They reflect on the life of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, who died Wednesday at age 89. Rev. Shuttlesworth co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and in his fight for civil rights braved beatings and the bombing of his home.

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