Tell Me More

Weekdays at 1 p.m.

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners, personal experiences of life-changing travel, the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders,and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground- the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

You can find more information about Tell Me More on their website.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin. Tell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Podcasts

  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) Part-Time Work, Unpredictable Schedules: What's The Fix? 2) Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking' 3) Host Michel Martin Takes Musical Cues From Directors 4) 'Traces Of Blue' Blends Jazz And Pop To Create Unique Sound
  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014 4:43pm
    Stories: 1) Tweeting From A Conflict Zone: Does It Help Or Hurt News Reporting? 2) For Pregnant Women, New Guidelines Aim To Reduce Workplace Discrimination 3) Despite Disability, One Mountain Climber Reflects On His Advantages 4) When It Comes To Other People's Kids, Should Parents Intervene?
  • Monday, July 21, 2014 4:33pm
    Stories: 1) Understanding The Basics Of the Conflict In Gaza 2) Could The Conflict In Ukraine Turn Into A Regional War? 3) Longtime LGBT Activist Reflects On The Early Days Of Her Advocacy 4) Phyllis Schlafly Explains Why Feminism Has Made Women Unhappy 5) Why Diversity In Tech Matters: 'People Solve Problems That They See' 6) For TMM Intern, Robert Glasper's 'Black Radio' Expands Category Of Hip-Hop
  • Friday, July 18, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) From Middle-Class To Poverty In A Mercedes 2) New Chief: NAACP Is Oldest And Best Civil Rights Organization 3) Anthony Mackie: Marvel Brings Humanity To Its Characters 4) Does Le Return Of LeBron Signal A Comeback For Cleveland?
  • Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:33pm
    Stories: 1) In Climb Up The Economic Ladder, African-Americans Getting Left Behind 2) Are White Gay Men Stealing 'Culture' From Black Women? 3) Malala Yousafzai Continues To Push For Equality And Justice 4) TMM Producer Relishes 'Fresh Attitude, Young Body'

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12:00pm

Thu September 29, 2011
World

Saudi Women Can Vote But Still Not Drive

Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah recently granted women the right to vote — but not until 2015. Only men can participate in Thursday's nationwide municipal elections. While some applaud the decree granting Saudi women voting rights, critics point out that women are still barred from many aspects of public life, including driving. Michel Martin talks with Ed Husain, Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Caryle Murphy, a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Murphy spent the last three years working in Saudi Arabia.

12:00pm

Thu September 29, 2011
Art & Design

Project Runway Sensation In 'Africa Underground'

Korto Momolu, a fashion designer and runner-up on the reality TV show Project Runway, has come out with her new Sankofa Collection. It's being featured Friday at "Africa Underground," an arts showcase at the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art.

12:01pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Law

At Age 80, Trailblazer Keeps Fighting For Justice

The award-winning documentary, Cruz Reynoso: Sowing the Seeds of Justice, is airing on public TV throughout Hispanic Heritage Month. It chronicles the life of Cruz Reynoso, a champion of the rural poor who became the first Latino justice on California's Supreme Court. He was also one of America's first Latino law professors. Reynoso and filmmaker Abby Ginzberg speak with guest host Jacki Lyden.

12:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Election 2012

Republicans Satisfied With Presidential Field?

With GOP candidate Rick Perry's decline in some polls and calls for New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to enter the race, some are wondering if the current field of Republican contenders has the gravitas to win the White House in 2012. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses the GOP primary race with Republican strategists Mindy Finn and Ron Christie.

12:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Around the Nation

'Diversity Bake Sale' Stirs Up Controversy

The Berkeley College Republicans based prices of their baked goods on customers' race and gender. The Tuesday event was protesting proposed legislation that would allow race, gender and ethnicity to be considered in the admissions process across California public universities. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks with Berkeley College Republicans President Shawn Lewis and UC Berkeley student body President Vishalli Loomba.

12:00pm

Wed September 28, 2011
Music

Jewish New Year Brings New Music

As Rosh Hashanah begins Wednesday night, The Afro-Semitic Experience brings a twist to traditional music associated with the holiday. The band's latest album, Further Definitions of the Days of Awe, fuses Jewish liturgical music with jazz and Afro-centric rhythms. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with founder, composer and bassist David Chevan, as well as drummer Alvin Carter Junior.

12:00pm

Tue September 27, 2011
NPR Story

How Europe Economic Woes Could Affect U.S. Markets

Slovenia, Finland and Germany parliaments are scheduled to vote this week on a rescue package to prevent Greece from defaulting. What does this mean for Wall Street and Main Street in America? Guest host Jacki Lyden hears from Wall Street Journal Reporter Sudeep Reddy and Bloomberg Business Week Senior Writer Roben Farzad.

12:00pm

Tue September 27, 2011
NPR Story

Wealth-Building Strategies For Latinos

Financial planner Louis Barajas' newly revised book, The Latino Journey to Financial Greatness advises Latinos to not only create wealth for themselves, but to build prosperous futures for their families. He speaks with guest host Jacki Lyden.

12:00pm

Tue September 27, 2011
NPR Story

Straight Talk On Menopause

September is Menopause Awareness Month. Menopause affects nearly every woman at some point in her life, yet the issue is difficult to address for many, including physicians and mothers. Tell Me More discusses how menopause affects women physically, mentally and socially, and how women and their families can best manage this time in their lives. (Language Advisory: This segment contains frank and explicit language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Education

No Child Left Behind: 'Revolutionary,' Controversial Idea

President Obama recently announced big changes to the Bush-era education law. Steve Perry, principal of Capital Preparatory Magnet School in Hartford, Connecticut, says the law is still a good idea, and it made his teachers pay attention to all students. Author Peg Tyre says the law focused the nation on the achievement gap but turned many schools into "test prep factories." Both speak with guest host Jacki Lyden.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
History

37 Years And Halfway Through Encyclopaedia Iranica

In 1974, Columbia University Professor Ehsan Yarshater began a comprehensive encyclopedia of Iranian history. Now, he's 91 years old and at the letter 'K.' Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses the project's scope and significance with Yarshater and contributor Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak, director of the Roshan Center for Persian Studies at the University of Maryland.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Around the Nation

Berenstain Bears Reconnect Indians to Native Language

After teaching children life lessons for nearly five decades through their books and recent TV series, the bears are now helping revive the American Indian tribal language of Lakota. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses Lakota with Sunshine Archambault-Carlow of the Standing Rock Sioux, a reservation in North and South Dakota.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Remembrances

First African Nobel Peace Prize Winner Dies

After a long battle with cancer, Wangari Maathai died at age 71. As one of Kenya's most recognizable female figures, she won the Nobel in 2004 for combining environmentalism and social activism. She spent over 30 years mobilizing women to plant 30 million trees in the Green Belt Movement.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Education

For States, More Flexibility In Education Policies

Many public school systems chafed under No Child Left Behind, the Bush-era law requiring states to closely monitor student achievement and conduct more regular testing. President Obama announced Friday that states can now qualify for exemptions from some of the law's key requirements. Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses the changes with Education Week Staff Writer Alyson Klein.

12:00pm

Mon September 26, 2011
Behind Closed Doors

The Illicit, Perilous World Of 'Pumping'

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is launching a public safety campaign Monday. It follows many cases of procedures gone wrong at the hands of unqualified surgeons, including 'pumpers' who illegally inject industrial-grade silicone into patients. The practice leads to dire health problems, even death. Guest host Jacki Lyden learns more with Laura Rena Murray, who recently reported this issue for the New York Times, and Dr. Malcolm Roth, the new president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

12:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
World

U.K.'s Cherie Blair Shares Words Of Advice

The wife of former U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair is helping African first ladies and their staff become stronger advocates for change. She speaks with Michel Martin about this work, the challenges and relationships she's had with the media, and what it takes to be an effective first lady.

12:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Barbershop

'Shop Talk': Death Penalty, GOP Debate

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 10:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, host: I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

Just ahead, most people want to do right by their loved ones when it comes time to say their final good-byes. But what if you've lost touch with the rituals of your faith? That's where the Shiva Sisters come in and we'll tell you about them in just a few minutes.

But first, it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

Read more

12:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
NPR Story

'Shiva Sisters' Keep Jewish Rituals Alive

While mourning the death of a loved one, many may find themselves at a loss when trying to incorporate their family's beliefs and traditions. That's when the Shiva Sisters step in. Their event planning business specializes in shiva, the period of mourning observed by Jews after a death. Michel Martin speaks with Allison Moldo and Danna Black about their work.

12:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Africa

Sierra Leone First Lady Redefines Health System

Mrs. Sia Nyama Koroma is working hard to fight one of the most common causes of death in Sierra Leone — maternal mortality. She's also participating in a new program that helps the first ladies of Western Europe, America and Africa share ideas on working effectively. She speaks with Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
BackTalk

Listeners Weigh In On Wealth, Cherokee Nation

Host Michel Martin and Senior Editor Alicia Montgomery comb through listeners' comments about Tell Me More's coverage of political debates surrounding wealth and class, as well as tribal citizenship for those who descended from African slaves of Cherokees. They also share updates on the online series 'The Mis-Adventures of Award Black Girl,' and the case of the transgender woman who was assaulted at a Baltimore McDonalds.

12:00pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Movie Interviews

Oscar Winner Jamie Foxx Touts 'Thunder Soul'

In the 1970s, a stage band from the Texas-based Kashmere High School rose to national prestige, winning multiple championships and recording eight records. After some 35 years, members reunited to honor their 92-year-old bandleader. Their story is told in the new documentary 'Thunder Soul.' Executive producer Jamie Foxx speaks with Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Thu September 22, 2011
Politics

Allen West: CBC Needs Conservatism, Civility

The Florida Congressman has been labeled as a rising star within the Republican Party. He speaks with Michel Martin about Obama's jobs plan; the role of his lone conservative voice in the mostly Democratic Congressional Black Caucus; why more blacks aren't making it to elite military teams; and the end of DADT.

12:00pm

Wed September 21, 2011
NPR Story

Jobs Take Focus At CBC Legislative Conference

The annual meeting of the Congressional Black Caucus kicks off Wednesday in Washington, D.C. Michel Martin speaks with CBC Chairman Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO) about African-Americans' 16.7 percent unemployment rate and why the CBC has not been more aggressive in criticizing President Obama.

12:00pm

Wed September 21, 2011
NPR Story

Film Sheds Light On Hate Crimes, Sparks Community Action

In 2008, seven white teens killed an Ecuadorian immigrant who had lived in Patchogue, New York for 13 years. The tragedy unearthed prolonged violence against Latinos in that town. Community members then came together to address immigration, hate crimes and safety. This is captured in the documentary 'Not In Our Town: Light In The Darkness.' Director Patrice O'Neill speaks with Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Wed September 21, 2011
Author Interviews

Michael Jackson ... Through His Brother's Eyes

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 4:28 pm

In the 1960s, five brothers — from a family of nine children — formed a music group in their living room in Gary, Ind. Their voices soon gained world stardom with songs such as "ABC," "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing," "Boogie Man" and "I'll Be There." They were the Jackson 5: Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon and Michael Jackson.

Their lives took different directions, but many of them stayed in the entertainment business. They pursued solo music careers, ran record companies and produced television series.

Read more

12:00pm

Wed September 21, 2011
Music

A Surprising Trip Through Bluegrass Country

Bill Monroe a legend of bluegrass music, which has been played on porches and in homes for generations. He would have been 100 years old this year. On the anniversary of his birth, writer Jason Cherkis journeyed through Kentucky to see how the musical genre has continued to evolve. He chronicles his trip in this week's Washington Post Magazine. He speaks with Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Parenting

Latina Moms Find Advice, Community In 'MamiVerse'

The news and lifestyle website MamiVerse launched this summer. It features Latina journalists, writers, entrepreneurs and everyday moms who are just trying to keep it all together. The site is also for the moms' daughters and their families.

12:00pm

Mon September 19, 2011
NPR Story

Can Arab Spring Improve Lives Of Women?

New governments are forming in the Middle East and North Africa, and women are behind many of the calls for change. Asma Khader is trying to make sure women's voices are heard. She's also one of three investigators who documented human rights abuses in Libya. She'll brief the U.S. Senate this week on challenges to democracy. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

12:00pm

Mon September 19, 2011
NPR Story

Star Of Emmys: Modern Family

Millions of Americans tuned into the 63rd annual Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday, where the comedy show Modern Family took home five awards. LL Cool J also rapped about movies and mini series, and Charlie Sheen made surprising comments before presenting the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series.

12:00pm

Mon September 19, 2011
NPR Story

Truth And Tangles In Money Talk

In her weekly commentary, host Michel Martin says Americans don't know how to talk about money, even though we talk about money all the time. She also says the current debate about deficit and debt has undertones of wealth and class.

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