Weekend Edition Saturday

Saturdays from 8-10 a.m.

Saturday mornings are made for Weekend Edition Saturday, the program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. The two-hour program is hosted by NPR's Peabody Award-winning Scott Simon.

Drawing on his experience in covering 10 wars and stories in all 50 states and seven continents, Simon brings a humorous, sophisticated and often moving perspective to each show. He is as comfortable having a conversation with a major world leader as he is talking with a Hollywood celebrity or the guy next door.

Weekend Edition Saturday has a unique and entertaining roster of other regular contributors. Marin Alsop, conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, talks about music. Daniel Pinkwater, one of the biggest names in children's literature, talks about and reads stories with Simon. Financial journalist Joe Nocera follows the economy. Howard Bryant of EPSN.com and NPR's Tom Goldman chime in on sports. Keith Devlin, of Stanford University, unravels the mystery of math, and Will Grozier, a London cabbie, talks about good books that have just been released, and what well-read people leave in the back of his taxi. Simon contributes his own award-winning essays, which are sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant.

Weekend Edition Saturday is heard on NPR Member stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.

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After A Turbulent Week, Mizzou Students Look Ahead

Nov 14, 2015

After a turbulent week spurred by racial tensions at the University of Missouri, students are reflecting and thinking about what changes they hope for next on campus.

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We're following to news from France today after a night of devastating violence in Paris. Coordinated attacks killed more than 120 people in six separate attacks, leaving the city really and on edge. A Parisian man spoke with France 24 today.

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Millions of people grew up in a time when we had nuclear nightmares. We worried that a few huge bombs might blow up the world, and we rehearsed how we should hide below our school desks if sirens ever sounded.

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Haxie Meyers-Belkin is a journalist with France 24. She was on the scene immediately after the attacks and joins us now from Paris. Thanks so much for being with us.

HAXIE MEYERS-BELKIN, BYLINE: Hello.

Julia Botero / WRVO news

John Rogers grew up adjacent to Butterfield Lake in Redwood. That’s in the Indian Lakes region in Jefferson County.  When his grandparents passed they left him 100 acres of pristine wetland and grassland. Now, Rogers has transformed his backyard into a tourist attraction.

On Thursday, Maamoun Abdulkarim came to address the Italian Parliament regarding the plight of Syria's 10,000 archaeological sites. Italy has been active in helping protect antiquities in conflict zones.

Abdulkarim, the head of Syria's antiquities agency, says that 99 percent of museum collections — some 300,000 museum pieces — have been salvaged, but civil war has still caused massive damage.

Week 9 NFL Roundup And Dusty Baker

Nov 7, 2015
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Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The Keystone XL pipeline project has been in front of Barack Obama for most of his administration. Yesterday, President Obama said it won't be built.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Tap dance may not be the most popular form of dance currently, but you may have thought otherwise if you were in Oswego this week. MacArthur Genius Grant winner Michelle Dorrance's performance of “SOUNDspace” at SUNY Oswego sold out, as did the master class she taught to local young tap dancers at Miss Kelly’s Dance Company. Dorrance is known for her innovation and experimentation. WRVO's Mark Lavonier spoke with Dorrance while she was in Oswego about how she views tap dancing.

An Inner-City Team Is Putting U.S. Rugby On The Map

Oct 31, 2015

If you're a sports fan in this country, it's more likely you'll be tuned into the World Series than the Rugby World Cup this weekend.

And here, rugby is more associated with prep schools or elite colleges. But now that one Memphis high school rugby team has flown onto the international radar, that could change.

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It's time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Utica remembers history of abolition

Oct 30, 2015

It’s been 150 years since the passage of the 13th Amendment, which ended slavery in the United States. The amendment was ratified after the end of the Civil War, but the

fight to end slavery took place over decades. One battle fought in 1835 in downtown Utica was commemorated recently.

Ron Nagle is a lot like his ceramics: compact, tidy, quirky — and colorful.

The artist, who has helped take clay to the heights of the contemporary art world, recently sported black pants, a blue-and-white striped T-shirt, white shoes, red socks and a rose-colored hat.

Around his neck hangs a long silver chain, filled with charms. There's a heart, signifying Valentine's day, the date he was married decades ago; an R for his first name; a skull representing death; a hare, Nagle's sign in Chinese astrology.

As Democrats gain from the nation's growing diversity — attracting solid majorities among Hispanic and African American voters — Republicans are gaining among white, working-class voters, a group that was once a Democratic stronghold.

Nowhere is this clearer than in West Virginia, where the president touched down this week to talk about drug addiction.

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Jamie Cullum, musician and BBC Radio 2 host, is constantly searching for the freshest sounds in jazz music. A frequent guest on Weekend Edition, he recently visited the program to share new music from Matthew Halsall & the Gondwana Orchestra, Daymé Arocena and Sons of Kemet. The sounds range from Coltrane-influenced spiritual jazz to acoustic club music informed by the traditional sounds of Ethiopia and West Africa.

Richie Lanz, a small-potatoes talent agent from Van Nuys, Calif., has been mired in hard luck for a while now. But things don't get much better when he takes a client to entertain American troops in Afghanistan — and she promptly leaves him stranded in no more than his underwear.

Long-Lost Parachuting Beaver Footage

Oct 24, 2015
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Julia Botero / WRVO news

Trees in the North Country are clinging to the last of their leaves. In Alexandria Bay, you can take a walk to admire what remains of fall foliage at Otter Creek Preserve. The trail is now open to the public for the first time. It snakes through more than a hundred acres of woods, wetlands, shrub and grasses.

Just off the Old Dixie Highway in Northwest Georgia, a white building stands proudly on a hilltop.

"To me, it looks like a church," says Marian Coleman, who has taken care of this building for some 20 years. She stands out front, looking up at the gleaming paint, the big windows and the pointed roof.

It never was a church. Instead, it was a two-room schoolhouse.

Obama's plan to leave 5,500 U.S. troops in Afghanistan at the end of his term means he won't fulfill a promise to remove all American forces from that war zone. While he added the disclaimer, "I do not support the idea of endless war," he also said he's not disappointed.

The 51st Head of the Charles regatta is underway this weekend in Boston, where about 10,000 rowers from around the world will compete.

This year's event includes a new category of race that will include some kinds of rowers with disabilities, but not others.

More than anything, Kristina Gillis would like to race in the world-renowned Head of the Charles. The 26-year-old is part of a program for rowers who have intellectual disabilities, and there's no category specifically for rowers with disabilities like hers.

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