Weekend Edition Saturday

Saturday at 8-10am
Join Scott Simon Saturday Mornings for Weekend Edition
Scott Simon


Saturday mornings are made for Weekend Edition Saturday, the program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. The two-hour program is hosted by NPR's Peabody Award-winning Scott Simon.

Drawing on his experience in covering 10 wars and stories in all 50 states and seven continents, Simon brings a humorous, sophisticated and often moving perspective to each show. He is as comfortable having a conversation with a major world leader as he is talking with a Hollywood celebrity or the guy next door.

Weekend Edition Saturday has a unique and entertaining roster of other regular contributors. Marin Alsop, conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, talks about music. Daniel Pinkwater, one of the biggest names in children's literature, talks about and reads stories with Simon. Financial journalist Joe Nocera follows the economy. Howard Bryant of EPSN.com and NPR's Tom Goldman chime in on sports. Keith Devlin, of Stanford University, unravels the mystery of math, and Will Grozier, a London cabbie, talks about good books that have just been released, and what well-read people leave in the back of his taxi. Simon contributes his own award-winning essays, which are sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant.

Weekend Edition Saturday is heard on NPR Member stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.

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8:00am

Sat September 24, 2011
Author Interviews

Between China And India Lies Myanmar's Future

Transcript

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8:00am

Sat September 24, 2011
Fine Art

The News, As Reported By Andy Warhol

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: Tomorrow, the National Gallery of Art opens "Warhol: Headlines" an exhibit of the late artists' works depicting the news industry in America. Andy Warhol would recreate front pages of New York newspapers in the way he did Campbell's soup cans, occasionally adding a change or flourish.

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12:01am

Sat September 24, 2011
Monkey See

Rin Tin Tin: From Battlefield To Hollywood, A Story Of Friendship

The original Rin Tin Tin was born in 1918 and died in 1932.
Courtesy of Simon and Schuster

The story of how Rin Tin Tin became one of the most celebrated animals in film history is almost as Hollywood-tinged as cinema itself.

The short version: Lee Duncan, an American serviceman during World War I, found a mostly destroyed dog kennel right on the field of battle. Duncan rescued the pup who became Rin Tin Tin, brought him home to California, and later put him in the movies.

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7:32pm

Fri September 23, 2011
Music Interviews

Gavin DeGraw: Make Do And Mend

Gavin DeGraw's new album is titled Sweeter.
Patrick Fraser

Gavin DeGraw charged onto the music scene in 2003 with his debut album, Chariot. It had hits that included the title track, "Follow Through," and his double-platinum smash, "I Don't Wanna Be."

He's gone through some hard knocks since then, but the 34-year-old singer-songwriter has taken it all in stride and has just released his fourth album, Sweeter. He tells Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon that his latest set of songs "straddles the line between sexuality and masculinity."

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8:00am

Sat September 17, 2011
Columns

Fatherhood, Not Testosterone, Makes The Man

In this week's essay, host Scott Simon reflects on the changes that fatherhood brings to men, including a surprising physical change.

5:42am

Sat September 17, 2011
Author Interviews

'The Arrogant Years': An Egyptian Family In Exile

Lucette Lagnado's parents started their lives together in late '40s Cairo.

Her father was Jewish, a charmer who hobnobbed with the city's social elite. Her mother, Edith, was also Jewish — a brilliant, bookish, beautiful girl who read all of Proust before she was 15, became chief librarian of a Jewish school in Cairo, and was a protege of the wife of an Egyptian dignitary, or pasha.

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5:43pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Music Interviews

How Pearl Jam Stayed Alive

Pearl Jam's two-decade career is chronicled in Cameron Crowe's new film, Pearl Jam 20.
Danny Clinch

Pearl Jam is 20 years old. Most rock bands don't make that milestone; rock can be a rough way to make a life.

Cameron Crowe, the Academy Award-winning writer and director, was once an astonishingly young rock journalist. In the early 1990s, he went to Seattle to see Pearl Jam when the band was just starting out. What followed is chronicled in Crowe's new documentary, Pearl Jam 20, which opens in theaters next week.

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2:43pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Music Interviews

Lindsey Buckingham: A Time To Every Purpose

Lindsey Buckingham's new album is titled Seeds We Sow.
Jeremy Cowart

Lindsey Buckingham helped make Fleetwood Mac one of the biggest rock bands of all time. He works mostly solo today, and his sixth solo album, Seeds We Sow, just came out.

Buckingham takes the "solo" designation seriously: He wrote, produced and engineered the album himself, as well as playing most of the instruments. He tells Weekend Edition Saturday's Scott Simon that the effects of that approach come through in the music.

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8:16am

Sat September 10, 2011
Simon Says

Thoughts On Nine-Eleven From September 1, 1939

Millions of people, including my children, have been born since September 11, 2001. This year, I find myself wondering how to tell them about that day and those that followed. Maybe the most we can hope for is to pass on a few memories of New York then.

All of the photographs that sprouted on lampposts and walls: smiling faces snapped on vacations and joyous occasions, suddenly underscored with wrenching, urgent words, and question marks that pierced like hooks:

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8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Sports: U.S. Open, NFL

Host Scott Simon and NPR's Mike Pesca discuss the US Open tennis tournament and the opening weekend of the 2011 NFL season.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Arthur Ashe: A Civil Right Activist Off The Court

NPR's summer road trip series, "Honey Stop the Car!" pulls over in Richmond, Va., where a statue of tennis great Arthur Ashe stands in an unlikely place. It's among statues of major figures from the Confederacy. Allison Keyes

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Sept. 11 A 'Fundamental Turning Point' For Blair

In observance of the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, host Scott Simon talks with former British Prime Minister Tony Blair about the U.K.'s role in fighting terrorism and Britain's relationship with the U.S.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Protesters Attack Israeli Embassy In Cairo

Angry Egyptian protesters attacked the Israeli Embassy in Cairo overnight, breaching the building and sending the Israeli ambassador, his family and most embassy staff fleeing. Host Scott Simon gets the latest from NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Cairo.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Libyans Launch Attack On Towns Loyal To Gadhafi

Libya's victorious rebels say they will soon launch operations against the last three Libyan towns still held by forces loyal to ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. Host Scott Simon talks to NPR's Corey Flintoff from Bani Walid, in the desert south of Tripoli.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: FEMA, Boise, Quotations

Host Scott Simon reads listener comments about last week's show.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

As Election Nears, Jobs Are First Priority

NPR's Andrea Seabrook joins host Scott Simon to talk about how Congress — particularly its GOP members — are responding to the president's appeal for stimulus spending to create jobs.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Passing On Memories Of Sept. 11

In this week's essay, host Scott Simon reflects on his experiences on Sept. 11, 2001, in New York and wonders how he'll tell his children about them.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

NHL Weathers Dark Off-Season

The National Hockey League is mourning more deaths this week. At least six current and former NHL players were killed Wednesday in the crash of a plane carrying a professional Russian hockey team. They were the latest in a series of tragedies involving NHL players in 2011. Tom Cavanagh and Rick Rypien both committed suicide, Derek Boogaard was found dead of a drug overdose, and the future of the league's star player, Sidney Crosby, is uncertain because of injury. Tom Goldman

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Lead Lives Firefighters Died To Save, Widow Urges

Host Scott Simon talks with Joanne Barbara, the widow of New York Fire Department Assistant Chief Gerard A. Barbara, who died on Sept. 11, 2001, as he led the rescue effort from the lobby of the south tower of the World Trade Center.

6:24am

Sat September 10, 2011
Movie Interviews

Following 'Soldiers,' To The Battlefield And Back

Originally published on Sat September 10, 2011 11:45 am

"There are so many questions and so little answers while you're [in Afghanistan]," says Dominic "Dom" Fredianelli.
Heather Courtney Quincy Hill Films

Filmmaker Heather Courtney didn't set out to make a war story. "I set out to make a story about rural America," she says. Her new documentary, Where Soldiers Come From, is both war story and small-town homecoming saga; it follows a group of young men who sign up for the National Guard, serve in Afghanistan, and then return home to their families in Michigan's woody Upper Peninsula.

Courtney joins NPR's Scott Simon to discuss the documentary, along with two of the young soldiers featured in the film, Dominic "Dom" Fredianelli and Matt "Bodi" Beaudoin.

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5:15am

Sat September 10, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

'Heart Of A Soldier': An Opera At The Heart Of Sept. 11

A shot from the dress rehearsal of Heart of a Soldier, which opens Saturday.
Corey Weaver

A man saves thousands from a burning building, then goes back in to make sure he got everyone out. He dies, leaving behind the great love of his life. It might sound too dramatic to be real life, but it happened exactly 10 years ago this Sunday, at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Journalist James Stewart wrote a book about that man, called Heart of a Soldier, and now that book is the subject of a new opera, premiering Saturday in San Francisco.

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4:58pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Lady Antebellum: The Kings (And Queen) Of Country Pop

Lady Antebellum's new album is titled Own the Night. Left to right: Charles Kelley, Hilary Scott, Dave Haywood.
Courtesy of the artist

Hillary Scott, Dave Haywood and Charles Kelley are all accomplished musicians in their own right, but taken together, they form the country-music mega-group Lady Antebellum. It's been been a relatively quick trip up the charts for the trio, whose ubiquitous single "Need You Now" was certified five times platinum. Now, Lady Antebellum is set to release its third studio album in as many years, Own The Night.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
From Our Listeners

Letters: Relay Race, King Memorial

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF LETTERS THEME MUSIC)

SIMON: Last week, we interviewed filmmaker Christoph Baaden about Oregon's near 200-mile relay race Hood to Coast.

CHRISTOPH BAADEN: There really isn't any kind of prize money or different medals for people finishing this thing first. It's just for the love of, I think, of running but more importantly, camaraderie.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
Around the Nation

Sybil Ludington: Paul Revere In A Skirt?

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: We've been motoring through the summer with our road trip Honey, Stop the Car. We're curious about those commemorative plaques and monuments in towns all over the country that honor local heroes or events. This morning - markers. Member station WSHU takes us to New York's Hudson River Valley and to a dramatic statue of a teenage girl from the Revolutionary War.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
Education

Sexual Orientation Added To Illinois College's Application

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: College applications contain a multitude of boxes to check. Potential students may be asked to disclose their race or their religion. Now, a college in Illinois is adding another check-box, inviting applicants to disclose their sexual orientation.

Elmhurst College is thought to be the first in the country to do this. Applicants who answer yes could get a scholarship worth up to a third of their tuition.

We're joined now from studios of WBEZ in Chicago by Dean of Admissions at Elmhurst College.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
Space

A Stellar Explosion In The Big Dipper's Handle

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: The Big Dipper has a shiny new sequin on its handle, it's a supernova, the magnificent last hurrah of a star. This weekend is a rare opportunity for amateurs to see a supernova from Earth. People all over the country will be able to catch a glimpse of the fireball from their backyards, as it reaches peak brightness over the next few nights.

Peter Nugent is an astronomer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, joins us from a studio there.

Dr. Nugent, thanks for being with us.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
Sports

Sports: Clemens' Trial, NFL, College Football

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: And I love sports. Perjury charges, bar brawls, speeding. In fact, I'm working on a TV pilot.

(SOUNDBITE OF CLANK CLANK)

SIMON: Law and Order: Sports. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us.

Hi there, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN: Hi, Scott.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
Middle East

Israel Seen Increasingly Isolated In Middle East

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Israel is facing growing diplomatic isolation in its region. Yesterday, Turkey expelled the Israeli ambassador and other diplomats from Ankara, and the popular protest known as the Arab Spring have eroded Israel's ties with some other neighbors. To talk about all this we have James Hider on the line. He's a correspondent for the Times of London who is based in Jerusalem. James, thanks for being with us.

JAMES HIDER: Morning.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
Business

Big Banks Sued Over Risky Mortgages

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: A federal regulator has filed a lawsuit against 17 financial firms - some of them the biggest names on Wall Street. The suit alleges misrepresentation and negligence in the sale of mortgage securities. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

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8:00am

Sat September 3, 2011
Simon Says

The Effect Of An Absent Clause On Dr. King's Cause

There's a quote carved into the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial on the National Mall: "I was a drum major for justice, peace, and righteousness."

Except, as poet Maya Angelou pointed out this week, it's not a quote. It's a concentrated paraphrase that takes a word here and there from a speech that begins with Dr. King saying that he didn't wanted to be lauded, but --

"If you want to say that I was a drum major," he began, "say that I was a drum major for justice ..."

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