2016 election

With New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary less than a week away, the publisher of the state's largest paper, the Union Leader, told NPR's Robert Siegel his assessment of how the Republican presidential race has played out thus far in a single word: "Extraordinary."

And the reason he describes the GOP campaign that way boils down to Donald Trump, who, despite coming in second in the Iowa caucuses this week, enjoys a double-digit advantage in most New Hampshire polls.

Coin tosses, a squeaker of a win and, perhaps even more surprising, humility. That's what marked Monday night's Iowa caucuses, the first votes cast in the 2016 presidential election.

The presidential candidates are now focused on New Hampshire, where polls put Bernie Sanders ahead of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump ahead of Ted Cruz, the Union Leader reports. The New Hampshire primaries will be held next Tuesday, Feb. 9.

Here's a roundup of headlines from the morning after the Iowa campaign.

The Stream: Iowa Caucuses Edition

Feb 1, 2016
Win McNamee / Getty Images

The Stream brings you all the latest in politics, this time from the Iowa caucus.

Stephanie Hundley is an enthusiastic Bernie Sanders supporter. The 28-year-old from Waterloo is also enthusiastic about the fact that she's not going to vote for Hillary Clinton just because she's a woman.

The Takeaways:

  • Republican candidates raised more than $227 million in 2015, less than the GOP field raised in 2011.
  • The year-end reports include the first disclosure of big money from Donald Trump and reveal the precarious state of Jeb Bush's White House bid.
  • Some wealthy conservative donors, including Las Vegas billionaire Sheldon Adelson, haven't put their money behind any GOP candidate yet. Big donors on the Democratic side are behind Hillary Clinton.
Courtesy Tom Dadey

Onondaga County Republican Chairman Tom Dadey is endorsing Donald Trump for president. Dadey and Trump go back a few years to 2014, when he was part of a group that met with Trump to discuss a run for governor. Trump at one point came to Syracuse for a GOP fundraiser, and Dadey has been a fan ever since.

"Our economy is sluggish, we’re not respected in the world and we need somebody who is going to be a good strong leader, and I believe that is Donald Trump," Dadey said.

He said he’s not the only one in central New York with that opinion.

Join us on WRVO as we prepare for the 2016 election, both on a regional and national level. Reporters at NPR have been on the road with candidates, conducting interviews and gathering details of their plans for the nation.

As part of this coverage, we will offer on-air specials leading up to Election Day, including:

The Iowa Caucus

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo got involved in the rhetoric of the GOP presidential debate, appearing on three morning TV news shows to defend New York against disparaging remarks made by candidate Ted Cruz in Thursday night's debate.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

The race for the Democratic nomination in the 24th Congressional District is ramping up. The three hopefuls met voters at a forum in Manlius last night, as they look for party support.

A mostly older crowd that packed a room at the Manlius Library applauded when party officials noted there will be a choice for Democrats when it comes to deciding who should face freshman GOP Rep. John Katko in November. 

And while the trio agreed on decidedly Democratic issues like income inequality, they offered differences in style and background.

At the kickoff of a six-day campaign swing through Iowa, there's no mistaking which voters Ted Cruz is trying to reach — evangelicals.

King's Christian Bookstore in Boone was the first of 28 stops this week. Before he began his pitch, he cited Scripture he saw on the wall.

"I was looking up and seeing Joshua 24:15 on the wall: 'Choose you this day whom you will serve. As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.' "

Broome County teacher declares candidacy for Hanna seat

Jan 5, 2016
Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

Republican George Phillips of Broome County announced Monday he will run to replace retiring Rep. Richard Hanna in Congress. 

Phillips is a history teacher at Seton Catholic High School in Binghamton. He lost a tight race for Congress against longtime Democratic Rep. Maurice Hinchey in 2010, before district lines were redrawn.

Speaking to reporters at Rec Park in Binghamton, Phillips said he plans to focus on the economy in his campaign.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

As 2016 gets underway, Rep. John Katko (R-Camilius) is embarking on his second year in Washington, representing the 24th Congressional District. The former federal prosecutor had never held political office before winning the seat in 2014.

While Katko said he went to Washington with his eyes open to the dysfunction and the partisan politics of the Capitol,  things weren’t as bad as he expected.

Paladino urges New York Republicans to back Trump

Jan 1, 2016
Michael Mroziak / WBFO News

While the New York Primary is just under four months away, former gubernatorial candidate and western New York businessman Carl Paladino is encouraging Republicans to back Donald Trump's presidential bid now.

Paladino expressed his support for Trump's campaign in an open letter to the state's Republicans, and urges party leadership not to be neutral, especially with state Democratic party leaders already backing Hillary Clinton.

In Paladino's opinion, GOP leadership in New York state is too establishment-minded. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) has only been in Congress for a year, but says he’s seen a lot of changes in what many Americans view as a dysfunctional arm of government. 

After Katko took his oath of office last January, and started learning the ropes in Washington, he says the atmosphere was highly politically charged. A push to defund the Department of Homeland Security over immigration policy was just one of those very partisan issues that lawmakers faced.

"It was divisive. And some of those early votes, I was pulling my hair out, what the heck’s going on here.”

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) says he’s retiring at the end of his term so he can be closer to his family. He says the decision has nothing to do with the political rancor he’s experienced in Washington as a representative of what is now the 22nd Congressional District.  But he says he would like to see politicians become a little better at working together.

Hanna, a moderate Republican, says he’s been criticized by some in his party for his stands on certain social issues. And he says that’s all right.

The 24th Congressional District, currently held by Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus), is already attracting a lot of Democratic hopefuls, with nearly a year to go before the 2016 election. One of those hopefuls is Colleen Deacon, a former aide for U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY). Before that, she served as press secretary for former Syracuse Mayor Matt Driscoll. 

Hanna to announce retirement from Congress

Dec 20, 2015
Ryan Delaney / WRVO file photo

Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) is expected to announce Monday that he will retire from Congress when his current term ends at the end of 2016.

This week on the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher has a wide-ranging political discussion with Matt Bennett, a vice president of a centrist Washington think tank.  Bennett argues that the Democratic Party is in the worst shape it’s been in, in over 80 years, despite holding the White House for two terms and enjoying what appears to be a growing demographic advantage among the population.  They also discuss the current presidential field and Hillary Clinton’s potential to be a genuine agent for change in Washington.

jamelah / via Flickr

Friday is the deadline for New Yorkers to vote in this year’s elections. But there’s an added avenue to register to vote by the midnight deadline.

This week on the Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher is joined by first-term Congressman John Katko, who represents central New York’s 24th district.  The wide-ranging discussion covers the funding for Planned Parenthood, poverty in Syracuse, Katko’s effort to be moderate and bi-partisan, his campaign support from the Republican Party’s Patriot Program, and the Republican presidential field.

Note: This interview was recorded before Speaker of the House John Boehner announced that he would retire from Congress at the end of October.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Syracuse University professor Eric Kingson announced he will be seeking the Democratic nomination for Congress in the Syracuse-area's 24th District in 2016.

Kingson is pushing a progressive agenda leading with an expansion of Social Security. A small but vocal crowd of younger and older people came out to Kingson’s campaign launch in Syracuse and those two demographics are exactly who Kingson said he wants to connect with.

It doesn’t seem like central New York Republicans have settled in on any of the candidates looking for the GOP presidential nomination, at least so far. And last week’s Republican debate may have winnowed the field for some local political junkies, but only by a bit.

kristinsoltisanderson.com

The Republican party has a demographics problem, which extends beyond Donald Trump's recent comments on immigration. Front and center in this problem is the party's appeal among millenial voters. This week, host Grant Reeher speaks with Kristin Soltis Anderson, a republican pollster and author of "The Selfie Vote."

Baldomero Fernandez

  What has been the role, not of liberalism, but of the genuine Left, in recent American politics?  What is its agenda, and its future?  In this edition of the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher talks with The Nation's editor, Katrina vanden Heuvel, on the magazine's 150th anniversary.  They cover domestic politics and policy, inequality, and America's role in the world.  They also look at the curre

When women run for office, they face closer and more negative scrutiny from the media, are more likely to get damaging coverage based on how they look and what they wear, and face other gender-based challenges, such as voter prejudice and difficulties raising money.  All sound true?  In this edition of the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher talks with George Washington University Professor Danny Hayes, who argues that the evidence from congressional elections does not support these assumptions commonly made by both political observers and political scientists. 

Matt Ryan / New York Now

 

It may be three years until the next statewide election, but potential candidates in New York State are already staking out their positions. Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman both say they are content with their jobs, and would like to keep them longer.

Courtesy Andy Daddio / Colgate University

Hours after Hillary Clinton formally announced her campaign for president Sunday, several New York officials and fellow Democrats quickly threw their support behind the former Secretary of State, who also served as U.S. senator from New York from 2001-2009. 

U.S. Army photo by Master Sgt. Kap Kim

Gov. Andrew Cuomo spent the weekend in Afghanistan, as part of a contingent of four U.S. governors on a trip to learn about counterterrorism measures.

Cuomo and the other governors were invited by the Defense Department, to receive briefings on counterterrorism efforts and increasing global threats, and to meet with the troops, including 270 Members of the New York National Guard and 900 members of Fort Drum’s 10th Mountain Division.

Cuomo held a conference call with reporters while in Afghanistan.

Courtesy Andy Daddio / Colgate University

There were no veiled questions of her political aspirations, and thus Hillary Clinton made no mention of whether she'll run for office again in a lecture at Colgate University in Hamilton Friday evening.

It was the former secretary of state and U.S. senator's second speech in central New York in three weeks. She spoke at Hamilton College on Oct. 4. It's been part of a series of lectures Clinton has been giving, on college campuses and to private functions.