2016 election

New York State Senate

There’s more evidence that the presidential race may affect which party will control the state Senate.

Currently, the GOP is holding on, with the help of one Democrat who meets with them.

But a new Siena College poll finds that nearly two-thirds of voters think that Donald Trump at the top of the ticket will not help Republicans hold on to the Senate, and Hillary Clinton as the Democratic candidate will actually help Democrats regain the Senate, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-Willsboro) visited New York Air Brake in Watertown Friday on a campaign stop. She spoke about how the Import-Export bank helps U.S. manufacturers compete internationally. Stefanik helped reform the bank.

“When American workers are able to compete on a level playing field there is no other country that is manufacturing the highest quality of products that the U.S. is,” said Stefanik.  

After her brief speech, the question and answer period turned to the presidential campaign.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) added his voice to a chorus of criticism regarding Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s comments to the Muslim parents of an Army captain killed in Iraq.

“We ought to revere our Gold Star mothers,” Schumer said. “We ought to praise them. We are to not be criticizing them. My heart goes out to these people who made the ultimate sacrifice and criticism of them is very, very wrong.”

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

New York State Senate Democrats hope to take leadership of their house away from Republicans in the 2016 elections — and many believe the candidates at the top of the ticket will help them do that.

The leader of the Senate Democrats, Andrea Stewart-Cousins, is at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia to witness the historic nomination of the first female candidate for president in a major political party. She said she hopes to break some barriers of her own later this year by becoming the first woman, and female African-American, to be Senate majority leader.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said it’s a “sign of respect” for New York state that he’s been asked to speak on the final evening of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

He said he plans to mention his father, Mario Cuomo, the former governor who gave the memorable “Tale of Two Cities” speech at the 1984 Democratic convention. Andrew Cuomo said it’s the first national convention that he’s attended without his father, who died on New Year’s Day 2015.

Cuomo said he plans to touch on the larger theme of the two conventions: fear versus hope.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo had a full schedule Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention, aimed at showcasing some of his strengths, including supporting LGBT rights and helping the homeless.

But first, he shared the stage with Hillary Clinton’s primary opponent, Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Cuomo began with a planned speech to the New York delegates attending the convention in Philadelphia, but he had to abbreviate it to leave time for the surprise guest to address the delegation of Clinton’s home state.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

It’s supposed to be Hillary Clinton’s convention, but the focus Monday was on her primary challenger, Bernie Sanders, and his delegates, who continue to stew over a WikiLeaks release of Democratic National Committee emails that showed favoritism to Clinton over Sanders.

In New York’s delegation, annoyed Sanders supporters attending the convention in Philadelphia struggled to even secure a room to meet in so they could discuss all that’s happened.

Karen DeWitt

New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli and Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner join capitol correspondent Karen DeWitt and Casey Seiler of the Albany Times Union on today's "ConventionCast" to share their thoughts on the Democratic National Convention, the DNC email controversy, and Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill deBlasio's relationship.

Find more from New York Now.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

New York state will have a big presence at this week’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Among the politicians who will speak from the podium, the state’s two senators.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Now that the Republican National Convention is over, the next step for Republicans, after the Democrats are done with their convention, is to begin the presidential general election campaign. The head of Trump’s New York campaign say he expects the state to be in play.

Buffalo businessman Carl Paladino says even though New York has many more Democrats than Republicans, Trump wants to compete against Hillary Clinton in his home state.

“We’re going to win big in Long Island and in upstate,” Paladino said. “We’re going to get crossover like you’ve never seen before.”

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, in a speech to New York’s delegates at the Republican National Convention, assailed Hillary Clinton for her husband’s extramarital affairs when he was president in the 1990s, saying she tried to shut the women up.

Giuliani, who dropped out of a race to challenge Clinton for the 2000 Senate race in New York, which she ultimately won, focused on a topic that so far has been avoided even on the convention floor — whether Clinton was culpable in covering up her husband’s sexual dalliances.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Wendy Long, the Republican candidate for Senate running against Sen. Charles Schumer, faces great odds in her campaign against the powerful and popular third-term senator. Long made her case when she addressed the New York delegation to the Republican National Convention Tuesday.

It’s the second time that Wendy Long is running for Senate. She lost to incumbent Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand four years ago, by 46 points, the largest margin of defeat for any statewide candidate in New York, ever.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Among the many Republican public officials sitting out of this week's GOP national convention is central New York Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld). The moderate congressman reiterated that he does not support nor will he vote for the GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

"A lot of people are just looking for an outlet to react to their -- I think rightful -- disdain, disgust with government," Hanna said. "But electing someone who's not competent to do the job is the opposite of what I think people should be doing."

Karen DeWitt

Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt is reporting from the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio this week. DeWitt, along with regular contributors to New York Now, will be bringing us podcasts from the road featuring members of each party.

Karen DeWitt

The Republican National Convention begins in Cleveland Monday. New York state Republicans will hear from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker, who are billed as official Trump-Pence surrogates, as well as CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow.

Republican State Party Chair Ed Cox says he doesn’t think the delegates need a lot of convincing, though he admits that many of them initially supported others in what was originally a 16-candidate race.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

As the Republican National Convention gets underway this week in Cleveland, one high-profile central New York Republican will be watching from afar.  Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) who is running for reelection in a highly competitive central New York district, continues to distance himself from the presumptive GOP presidential nominee.

Governor Andrew Cuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has offered only lukewarm support in the past for his fellow Democrats in their quest to take over the state Senate, said this week that he would back Democratic candidates in Senate races. He also somewhat reluctantly offered support to his former primary rival, Zephyr Teachout, who is now running for Congress.

Cuomo, answering a question from reporters in the Bronx, gave his strongest statements to date in the 2016 election cycle to back Democratic candidates for the Senate.

Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

Supporters of the two outsider candidates in the presidential race are finding obstacles to attending the national conventions in Philadelphia and Cleveland, held during the next couple of weeks.

Claudia Tenney for Congress; Steve Wells for Congress; George Phillips for Congress

The three Republican candidates running to replace retiring Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) in New York's 22nd Congressional District competed in four debates in June. Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney, Cazenovia businessman Steve Wells and Binghamton teacher George Phillips have showed few differences on major policy issues, but there was no shortage of friction.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Republican Wendy Long is taking another shot at running for U.S. Senate in New York state. The conservative lawyer from New York City lost a race against Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand four years ago in a landslide. This year, she’s taking on the man who could become the next Democratic Party leader in the Senate, Charles Schumer.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

There’s less than three weeks to go before congressional primary day in New York state. In tthe 24th District, the Democratic primary race is between Colleen Deacon, Eric Kingson and Steven Williams. This week, Deacon had some high profile supporters in town to boost her campaign. And she offered a hint of what a campaign against incumbent Republican Rep. John Katko would look like, if she wins the nomination.

Sen. Charles Schumer led things off outside Sunshine’s Coffee Shop in DeWitt.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

When five Oswego County legislators failed to file their oath of office cards on time earlier this year, they lost the seats they were elected to last November. The county legislature then appointed them to fill those vacancies, but state law still requires that they run again in a special election this fall. A bill in the New York state legislature would waive that requirement.

The Libertarian Party is growing in New York state. This weekend, Onondaga County becomes the latest county to join this party that challenges the idea of an omnipresent government, instead looking to individual sovereignty as the way to peace and prosperity.

Onondaga County will be the 15th county chapter the party has chartered in New York state and the fourth this year.

Shawn Hannon of Syracuse is leading the central New York effort.

"Libertarian people try to keep the government out of your wallet and out of your bedroom,” he said.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican presidential candidate and Ohio Gov. John Kasich was in the village of Solvay near Syracuse on Monday for one of his last campaign stops before New Yorkers vote in the primary. Kasich’s question-and-answer session with a crowd of about 150 people, was heavy on policy and in stark contrast to the massive rallies and lively speeches of the other candidates.

Laurie Howard-Patnode says she is torn between John Kasich and Ted Cruz.

governorandrewcuomo / via Flickr

Tuesday is not only New York’s presidential primary, it also the day for two special elections to replace the disgraced former leaders of the legislature who lost their seats after being convicted on multiple felony corruption charges.

One of the races is to replace former Senate Leader Dean Skelos, a Republican who is now facing a lengthy prison term on corruption convictions.  

Kristen Powers / For WRVO News

A crowded Le Moyne College auditorium welcomed Gov. John Kasich to Syracuse Friday night.

It’s no secret that Kasich is losing the three-man race for the GOP nomination with a total of 143 delegates.

That’s less than 20 percent of the 743 delegates Donald Trump has won and less than 30 percent of the 520 delegates Sen. Ted Cruz has earned.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is pushing for upstate New York votes before the state’s primary on April 19. During a visit to Syracuse on Friday, Clinton focused on creating jobs and raising incomes, two issues pertinent to central New York and the rest of upstate.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Hillary Clinton is hoping that her eight years as a senator from New York state will help her win the presidential primary here April 19. In a campaign stop in Syracuse Friday, she convened a manufacturing roundtable, made up mostly of people she dealt with as senator.

Clinton to campaign in Syracuse Friday

Mar 30, 2016
Hillary Clinton / Facebook

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will be in Syracuse Friday for two events, her campaign announced Wednesday.

The former senator, who represented New York, will hold a roundtable discussion on her plan to support manufacturing jobs. The time and location for the discussion has not yet been announced.

On Friday afternoon, Clinton will hold a grassroots organizing event for supporters at the Central New York Regional Market. That event starts at 2:00 p.m.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News (file photo)

In 2014, Donald Trump attended a Republican fundraiser in Syracuse as he floated the idea of running for governor of New York.  Some of the talking points and style Trump now uses on the presidential campaign trail can be heard in that earlier speech.

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