2016 presidential election

NPR's "Embedded" team returns with two programs on the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Host Kelly McEvers reports on two key questions explored by Special Counsel Robert Mueller for the next two Sundays on WRVO.

Collusion | Sunday, March 11 at 7 p.m.

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The FBI director and several top intelligence leaders are testifying on Capitol Hill about worldwide threats. The Senate Intelligence Committee, which is holding the hearing, is also conducting an inquiry into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Watch the proceedings live, here.

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Coming up this week, a special broadcast with Diane Rehm.

A year after President Trump's inauguration, Diane talks with a panel of top political analysts about how the country has changed since his election, and what's ahead for the White House, Congress and voters in 2018.

Tune in this Friday, January 19 at 1 p.m. and again Sunday, January 21 at 7 p.m. for this special broadcast. You can find more details about "One Year Under Trump" on WAMU's website.

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Donald Trump Jr. tweeted images of emails regarding his 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer today. An intermediary said he could connect Trump Jr. with people who had information "that would incriminate Hillary [Clinton]... and would be very useful to your father." Trump Jr. agreed to the meeting, which former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Trump son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner also attended in June 2016.

The NPR Two-Way blog is providing live coverage of the House Intelligence Committee's public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

The live blog (found below) includes streaming video of the proceedings, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents. 

The blog will begin after the hearing starts at 10 a.m. on Monday, March 20.

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The week of March 20 is expected to be a busy one on Capitol Hill, as high-profile hearings take place in the House and Senate.

On Monday, March 20, the House Intelligence Committee is holding a hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election. FBI Director James Comey and Admiral Mike Rogers, director of the National Security Agency, are among those being called to testify. The hearing is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

President Donald Trump tweets a lot. With tens of millions of followers on Twitter, Trump proposes policy, shares his latest actions and reacts to the news. But 140 characters rarely gives the full context. Here, the NPR politics team and reporters across the newsroom gave context for key tweets.

The NPR politics team focused on early tweets that could have larger implications. This service is no longer live, but you can read tweets and analysis provided by the NPR News team in the early month's of Trump's presidency.

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The NPR Politics team is provided annotation of President Donald Trump's inauguration speech, live, as it happens.

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On January 20, WRVO and NPR News will offer special live-coverage of the Presidential Inauguration. Tune in from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. as hosts Steve Inskeep and Audie Cornish co-host from the Capitol in Washington, D.C.

The Inauguration

From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., NPR News will feature the swearing in of the President and Vice-President; plus speeches, newsmaker interviews, live reports from around the Capitol and the National Mall, and analysis from NPR's Political Team.

Continuing coverage: The inaugural luncheon and parade

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The NPR Politics team and reporters across the newsroom will be live-annotating a news conference with President-elect Donald Trump, expected at 11 a.m. today.

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Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner heads to Albany Monday, one of 29 New York state electors who have pledged to vote for Hillary Clinton, when the Electoral College meets to validate the November presidential election. And the vote is taking place under the shadow of potential Russian influence on the election.

Miner and several other mostly Democratic electors demanded an intelligence briefing regarding potential Russian meddling in the November presidential election.

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The New York attorney general has proposed a package of bills aimed at improving to what he said are “arcane” and “ridiculous” voting laws that bar many potential New York voters from casting ballots.

Attorney General Eric Schneiderman began a statewide inquiry after his office received a record number of complaints about lack of voter access during the April presidential primary.

“In New York, we have what amounts to legal voter suppression,” Schneiderman said Tuesday at a news conference in Albany.

Rep. Tom Price, a Georgia Republican, is President-elect Donald Trump's pick for Secretary of Health and Human Services. He is currently chairman of the powerful House Budget Committee.

Price, an orthopedic surgeon for nearly 20 years before coming to Congress, has represented the northern Atlanta suburbs in the House of Representatives since 2005.

President-elect Donald Trump won a convincing electoral vote victory on Nov. 8, but he is claiming falsely that widespread voter fraud cost him the popular vote.

The latest totals show Hillary Clinton leading Trump in the popular vote by more than 2 million. Trump tweeted on Sunday afternoon, "I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally." He did not provide evidence to back up that claim, and Trump's representatives did not immediately respond to a request for more information.

Donald Trump is meeting with The New York Times after all, despite announcing by Tweet early Tuesday morning that he was canceling sessions with the paper's executives and journalists.

It continued a whirlwind 24 hours of Trump's mixed messages to the media.

The president-elect kicked it off Monday with a session in which he had invited television news anchors and executives to establish a new working relationship, only to berate them for what he termed unfair campaign coverage. He then told them he wanted a reset with the press.

Will disillusioned U.S. voters really move to Canada?

Nov 21, 2016
http://www.cic.gc.ca

The election of Donald Trump has some Americans looking north, perhaps to make a new home in a country removed from Trump's style of Republicanism.

Many said jokingly if Trump were elected they would move to Canada. For some, it's no longer a joke.

"You'll never be my president because I'm moving to Canada!" shouted one woman at a protest.

The declaration was born in anger and frustration, but also reflects what many Americans have been soberly contemplating.

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he has directed the New York State Police to create a hate crime investigation unit, in response to a number of racial incidents reported around the state since the presidential election Nov. 8.

"Fliers promoting the KKK were found on parked cars in Patchogue, Long Island. A swastika was discovered on the B Train in Manhattan. In Wellsville, outside of Buffalo, someone painted a swastika surrounded by the words 'Make America White Again'," Cuomo said during a speech at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in New York City Sunday.

This story was updated with video at 8:08 p.m. ET

Though also a big-time real estate developer, Jared Kushner is many things that Donald Trump is not.

At 35 years old, Kushner is half Trump's age.

He is an Orthodox Jew. Trump has been accused over the course of the campaign of trafficking in anti-Semitic themes.

Kushner is understated. He shies away from the limelight. Neither of those descriptions attaches to the president-elect.

President-elect Donald Trump took to Twitter on Thursday night to say Ford Motor Co. executive chairman William Ford Jr. had called to say the company would not move production of the Lincoln MKC from its Louisville Assembly Plant to Mexico.

A second Trump tweet claimed credit for the decision.

Ford, however, said it neither planned to close the Louisville, Ky., plant nor reduce jobs there. The company said it had considered moving Lincoln production to Mexico to increase production of the Ford Escape in Louisville.

Wednesday night, Hillary Clinton spoke publicly for the first time since her concession speech a week ago. At a Children's Defense Fund event in Washington, she spoke about the importance of fighting for America's kids, but she also wove in another message, telling her supporters to persist, even after the devastating loss of the presidential race.

"I know many of you are deeply disappointed about the results of the election," she said. "I am, too, more than I can ever express."

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This week on the Campbell Conversations, Oswego County Clerk Michael Backus and Syracuse University professor Chris Faricy return to the program to discuss the November elections.  They were last on the program in February following the Iowa Caucuses.  They discuss the long, strange political trip since then, and the implications of a Trump presidency for a variety of policies and other national political institutions.  

The election just ended and the new president doesn't even take office until Jan. 20. But the transition planning starts now.

Who's going to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of state? His chief of staff? His education secretary? Now that the news of Trump's election has settled, speculation over how the president-elect will fill out his administration has consumed Washington.

Keeping in mind the truism that nobody who knows is talking, and those who are talking don't really know, here are some of the names being floated, leaked and speculated about.

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About 150 anti-Trump protesters rallied in downtown Syracuse Wednesday night. Protesters were angered by both Republicans and Democrats. They condemned Trump for what they said was bigoted rhetoric on the campaign trail that expressed Islamophobia and xenophobia.

When American voters must choose a new president, reaction tends to rule. Given a choice between continuity and contrast, we favor contrast — even when the retiring incumbent leaves office with relatively high public approval.

This sometimes is called the pendulum effect: The farther the pendulum swings in one direction, the farther it is likely to swing back. In physics, every action has an equal and opposite reaction; in politics, the pushback sometimes can be disproportionate.

Donald Trump's presidential campaign, like the business career that preceded it, was unpredictable, undisciplined and unreliable. Despite those qualities — or perhaps, in part, because of them — it was also successful.

So what should we expect from President-elect Trump, mindful that his path to the White House has defied expectations at every turn?

Donald Trump will be the next president of the United States.

That's remarkable for all sorts of reasons: He has no governmental experience, for example. And many times during his campaign, Trump's words inflamed large swaths of Americans, whether it was his comments from years ago talking about grabbing women's genitals or calling Mexican immigrants in the U.S. illegally "rapists" and playing up crimes committed by immigrants, including drug crimes and murders.

Donald Trump has been elected the 45th president of the United States, the capstone of a tumultuous and divisive campaign that won over white voters with the promise to "Make America Great Again."

Trump crossed the 270 electoral vote threshold at 2:31 a.m. ET with a victory in Wisconsin, according to Associated Press projections.

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With Hillary Clinton being the first woman nominated for president from a major political party, some voters are remembering the long hard fight for women to gain the right to vote. In Fayetteville, they're marking the moment by going to the grave of Matilda Joslyn Gage, a major player in the sufragette movement upstate. Visitors left notes, flowers, and “I voted” stickers.

Today, as results come in across the country, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. The NPR Politics team, along with local station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

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