This week: elder abuse and more

Oct 6, 2016

Elder abuse usually occurs at home at the hands of family members. It might be physical, emotional, sexual or financial. It often goes unreported because the victim feels isolated, afraid and ashamed.

One way to fight elder abuse is to be aware of its warning signs, explains Jenny Hicks, project coordinator for the Abuse in Later Life program at Vera House, a local domestic and social service agency.

This week on Reveal: A mountain of misconduct, an update

May 10, 2016

Find out what's happened since we first told you about 40 years of alleged abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at specialty rehab centers across the U.S.

We teamed up with New Hampshire Public Radio health and science reporter Jack Rodolico to unveil how these for-profit facilities thrived on public dollars with little oversight.

David Sommerstein / NCPR

For more than a decade, undocumented Hispanic workers have been indispensable on dairy farms across Upstate New York. The immigrants live largely invisible lives and rarely stray off the farm to avoid detection by federal agents. They are also less likely to report abuses.

The recent accusation against former Onondaga County Family Court Judge Brian Hedges, that he sexually molested his 5-year-old deaf niece 40 years ago,  has brought the issue of abuse against the disabled  into the open.