affordable care act

Melissa DeRosa / Gov. Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is again wading into national issues this week. He’s had a press conference against the latest attempt in the U.S. Senate to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. And he met with the governors of California and Washington to discuss steps to slow climate change.

In both cases, the governor said he’s addressing the matters because the actions — or, in the case of climate change, inactions — in Washington have a harmful impact on New York.

Payne R Horning / WRVO News

The Senate's latest attempt to replace the Affordable Care Act is getting bipartisan heat from some of New York's representatives. They are worried that the so-called Graham-Cassidy bill could disproportionately hurt the Empire State.

In Oneida County Tuesday, a group gathered outside of Mohawk Valley Rep. Claudia Tenney's (R-New Hartford) town hall, holding up signs that said "HEALTH CARE, NOT TAX CUTS." They oppose the Graham-Cassidy bill that would cap health care funding for states and phase out the money that states like New York got for expanding their Medicaid program.

Payne R Horning / WRVO News

Mohawk Valley Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-New Hartford) was on the defensive for the majority of her first in-person town hall Tuesday night. More than 300 people attended the event that was hosted in the Oneida County town of Camden.

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New Yorkers who sign up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act exchanges for individuals will see their premiums rise by an average of 14 percent, now that the Cuomo administration has approved rate increases for insurers in the exchanges.

Part of the increase is due to worries and uncertainties over the future of the ACA, also known as Obamacare.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

There’s some good news and some bad news from the state comptroller’s office. The state’s nearly $200 billion pension fund is doing well, thanks in part to the booming stock market, but there are some worrisome signs for the future of New York’s finances.

Comptroller Tom DiNapoli said the pension fund is up this quarter by 2.9 percent, and has increased 11.5 percent from last year. DiNapoli said he likes to think that he and his staff have invested wisely, but he said a major factor is the booming stock market.

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New York state stands to lose nearly $1 billion if President Donald Trump follows through with his threat to “let Obamacare fail” and cut key health care subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

Trump has the power to end the subsidies, known as cost-sharing reductions, and he’s said he’ll withhold the payments as a way to pressure the Senate to find a way to repeal and replace the ACA.

The subsidies help pay for premiums for lower-income Americans.

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Planned Parenthood leaders in New York are anxiously monitoring the actions in the Republican-led Congress to try to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, and they say in all versions, their health care centers face big reductions.

Robin Chappelle Golston with Planned Parenthood Empire State Acts, the lobby group for the state's Planned Parenthood clinics, is watching the attempts to repeal and replace the ACA, also known as Obamacare, with trepidation.

She said it’s hard to follow, and she thinks that’s deliberate.

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The Senate is moving ahead on the repeal and possibly the replacement of the Affordable Care Act, and policy makers in New York are bracing for the worst.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, speaking Tuesday on the Senate floor, painted a grim picture of the current state of the ACA, also known as Obamacare, saying it’s caused pain “for literally millions of families.”

“Premiums have skyrocketed,” McConnell said. “Insurance options have declined.”

He said in some states, there is only one carrier available — and in some cases, there are none.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

The future of the Affordable Care Act is uncertain in Washington, and there are several scenarios under consideration. The latest possible changes could affect New York’s relatively healthy health care system.

The good news is that the Affordable Care Act in New York is doing quite well, according to state officials. The health insurance exchanges are functioning, with 17 carriers offering plans in 2017. State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, at a recent rally to preserve the ACA, said New York has built “one of the best health care exchanges in the country.”

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

At an event Thursday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo defined the conflict over changing the health care laws in Washington as a class struggle, saying it’s all about the rich versus the rest.

Cuomo did not mention President Donald Trump by name, but he said the nation’s health care is in crisis and the struggle is really about those with lots of money, and those with lesser means.

“Make no mistake. The rich are always going to have the best health care system in the world,” Cuomo said. “What they’re trying to decide is what’s the health care for the rest of us.”

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Central New York Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) has some harsh words for his fellow Republicans about how they are handling health care reform.

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The U.S. Senate no longer has the votes to pass a replacement for the Affordable Care Act. Two senators announced Monday night that they would would not vote for the Senate's healthcare plan. Earlier on Monday, New York’s top elected Democrats rallied against Congressional Republicans' proposals Monday, saying they will take legal action, if necessary, to stop them.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News (file photo)

The state’s lieutenant governor said New Yorkers should be deeply worried if the U.S. Senate approves a plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Currently, the Senate does not have the votes for the GOP plan, but Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul said that doesn’t mean opponents of the measure should be complacent.

“This is heading down a path that is very disturbing,” Hochul said.

She had some sarcastic advice for people if the repeal and replacement is approved: “Don’t get sick. And definitely don’t get old.”

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

Barb Emerson lives in a big, Victorian house with mauve-colored wood siding. It's in Gorham, New York, between Seneca and Canandaigua Lakes. And this week, she's taking care of her husband, Louis. He just had knee surgery.

"We gotta keep that leg straight, so I have to hold on to that leg for him all the time," she said as she walked onto her porch.

The Emersons have been married for 34 years. "I got a good one," Louis said.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

A Planned Parenthood clinic in Syracuse is taking part in a national campaign to bring awareness to the organization as its federal funding remains uncertain. Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner showed her support and took some jabs at congressional Republicans.

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The New York State Legislature is back at the Capitol for three weeks of meetings before the session ends later in June. A number of advocacy groups say there’s an opportunity for lawmakers to act to address some of the harm that they say President Donald Trump’s policies are causing. But divisions in the Legislature may hinder any chance of achievements.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Green Party candidates in Syracuse are pushing state Sen. John DeFrancisco (R-Syracuse) to support universal health care in New York. The bill could be close to getting a majority of senators to sign on.

Syracuse mayoral candidate Howie Hawkins said DeFrancisco is the only New York state legislator representing the city that is not in favor of a single-payer system.

“We want John to be a hero for Syracuse, because this bill would solve the city’s fiscal crisis,” Hawkins said.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Faith leaders from around New York came to the Capitol to gain support in the state Senate to adopt a statewide single-payer health care system. It would be an alternative to the national Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, which Republicans in Congress and President Donald Trump have been trying to dismantle.

Mountain Lake PBS live online

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-Willsboro) took a number of questions regarding healthcare at a community forum hosted by Mountain Lake PBS Monday night. Stefanik recently voted for the GOP healthcare plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which passed the House of Representatives. The North Country Republican defended the bill, but admits there are ways to improve it.

How the GOP health care bill could unfold in New York

May 8, 2017
www.bbb.org

Last week, the House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act law, the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act. This came after several changes to the AHCA, including to the policy on coverage for people with pre-existing conditions.

The update would allow insurance companies to charge sicker consumers more and healthier consumers less. The bill would offset the cost of sicker people with special funding -- $8 billion over five years. But what exactly this change would mean for individual consumers largely depends on which state they live in.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Some of New York’s Democratic leaders are expressing outrage over the Republican House of Representatives vote to undo the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has warned for months that the proposed repeal of the ACA would blow a multi-billion-dollar hole in the state budget and potentially cost state and local governments and New York’s hospitals $4.5 billion.

Those who get their health care through the New York Exchange, set up under Obamacare, could lose $400 million in tax credits. And 1 million New Yorkers could lose their health care. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

It’s become traditional to measure a president’s first 100 days in office. For President Donald Trump, that milestone occurs on Saturday. Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) says he isn’t ready to grade the president, but he does have some thoughts about how Trump has been doing.

WRVO News File Photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) joined Grant Reeher for this week's edition of the Campbell Conversations. In this preview, they talked about whether Katko has seen any political retribution for not backing President Donald Trump during the campaign, how House Speaker Paul Ryan is doing, and Katko's own political future. 

Note: Full audio and transcript of the interview will be available Saturday, April 8 at 6:00 a.m.

Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) hosted an opioid forum in Oswego Thursday night -- his first public event since Congress' failed attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News

New York officials are split over the Republican's proposed replacement to the Affordable Care Act and how it will impact the state. As the House of Representatives prepares for the scheduled vote on the legislation, state and federal leaders are fighting to sway the public to their side.

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A provision to shift Medicaid health care costs in New York from counties to the state as part of the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act by Congress is meeting with a cool reception from state leaders.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

As Congress attempts to change the Affordable Care Act, members are facing questions in their districts about how they come down on the new health care bill being pushed by House Speaker Paul Ryan and the Trump administration.  

Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-New Hartford) says she hasn’t made a decision yet on the new bill, the American Health Care Act.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

A hostile crowd in Ithaca lambasted Finger Lakes Rep. Tom Reed (R-Corning) this weekend over his support for legislation to replace the Affordable Care Act. The Republican said his party’s proposal was just the first step in a long process to reform the country’s healthcare system, but the participant’s in Saturday’s town hall said congress is heading in the wrong direction.

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s health department is analyzing the plan in the Republican Congress to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, and finds it carries a heavy price tag for New York. 

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

A provision in the Affordable Care Act replacement plan by Republicans in Congress sets up a potential clash with New York state over abortion coverage. 

The plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act by the GOP-led Congress includes tax credits for people to buy insurance policies. The Republican House plan forbids anyone from using the tax credits to buy an insurance plan that covers abortions.

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