affordable care act

New York is one of the states that will be offering insurance for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) through state health exchanges. What is arguably the landmark feature of the law also known as Obamacare, the registration springs into action tomorrow when New Yorkers can begin shopping and buying health plans through a marketplace called New York State of Health. Implementation of the plan has had its bumps and bruises, but New York is ready to go, even if lingering concerns in certain sectors remain.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said threats in Congress to defund Obamacare won’t have any effect on the federal Affordable Health Care Act going forward in New York.

Cuomo said even if Congress is gridlocked over funding for the federal health care act, New York will still be going ahead on Oct. 1 with the required health care exchanges.

 “The health exchange is up and running,” Cuomo said on a trip to Niagara Falls. “I don’t believe there’s going to be any effect on the state.”

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

In less than two weeks, the health exchanges that are an integral part of the Affordable Care Act will go into business in New York state, but officials are already starting to hear from residents who want to know how this will affect their health care.

Maffei discusses range of topics at town hall

Sep 17, 2013
Tom Magnarelli/WRVO

About sixty people came to Onondaga Community College Monday night for Rep. Dan Maffei's town hall meeting. Constituents asked about the Democrat from Syracuse Democrat everything from the economy to health care.  

Federal spending on infrastructure was one of the economic topics discussed. While Maffei says there is no partisan divide in central New York when it comes to investing in infrastructure, but he said he doesn't expect any bill on it to pass the Republican-controlled House of Representatives in the near future.  

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As delays pile up in the implementation of components of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded $150 million to the nation’s health care centers as part of an outreach and enrollment program for patients with low incomes.

The grants will help centers provide advice regarding the introduction of the Affordable Care Act, and how it will affect people’s current health coverage as well as those who are currently uninsured.

How New Yorkers will fare under the Affordable Care Act

Jul 12, 2013

The Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare, is one of the largest government programs begun in recent years. Along with that size, has come a lot of confusion about how it will effect medical services. As part of a series of community forums on health care, WRVO recently brought together a panel of experts to discuss how government spending affects health care in upstate New York.

401(K) 2012 / Flickr

Join us for the first in a series of community forums on health care.

The agency that has helped victims of HIV/AIDS for the past 30 years in central New York will soon be taking on a new responsibility. AIDS Community Resources will be a foot soldier in a revamped Medicaid system in New York state.

In the next month or so, ARC will begin offering case management services for Medicaid eligible individuals who don't necessarily have AIDS, but who have any chronic health issue.

It'll mean a name change for AIDS Community Resources, but more importantly, Executive Director Michael Crinnen says it will allow the agency do what it does best -- coordinate care for sufferers of a chronic disease, and hopefully keeping them out of the emergency room.

In a little more than six months, the Affordable Care Act will change the lay of the land for healthcare in this country. For hospitals, it continues changes that started a decade ago, says Richard Umbdenstock, the president of the American Hospital Association, who was in Syracuse Monday.

Stickley, Audi and Co. could be a poster child for workplace wellness. The 900 employees at the Manlius furniture making company lost a collective 2,600 pounds during its last round of a Biggest Loser contest, inspired by the popular TV show.

Some of the larger hospitals in New York state are worried about one aspect of the Affordable Care Act: academic medical centers are slated to lose millions of dollars in a particular kind of Medicaid payment over the next few years.

Medicare will look different a year from now, as the Affordable Care Act goes into effect.  But, Medicare advocates are worried about some potential changes to the program that pays for health care for the elderly.

The Rome Area Chamber of Commerce yesterday hosted a debate between the candidates for the new 22nd Congressional district, incumbent Republican Congressman Richard Hanna and Democrat challenger Dan Lamb. The district stretches from the eastern portion of Oswego county down through Binghamton. 

The candidates running for the 24th congressional district seat offered three distinct choices for voters in the first televised debate featuring all three candidates last night.   The budget deficit,  jobs, and health care reform were major issues discussed in the WCNY studios, but the most pointed comments mirrored a dispute in the campaign over abortion and the definition of rape.

Two of three candidates in the race for the 24th congressional district, met with voters in Cayuga county yesterday during a town hall forum organized by one of those candidates, Republican Congresswoman Ann Marie Buerkle.

Most New Yorkers agree with the recent Supreme Court decision upholding President Obama’s health care reform, but most think the new law, when fully implemented, will cause health care costs to rise.

Connectologist / via Flickr

Despite months of preparation, the CEO of Welch Allyn says a new excise tax on medical supplies will hurt his company's bottom line.

As part of the Affordable Care Act upheld last week by the Supreme Court, a 2.3 percent tax on medical devices sold in the United States will go into effect January 1. The tax is supposed to help pay for the expanded health care coverage.

Buerkle town hall

Jul 2, 2012
Ellen Abbott / WRVO

A bit of bickering broke out among citizens at Congresswoman Ann Marie Buerkle's town hall meeting in DeWitt Monday. But it wasn't even the big issues that caused disagreement.

The future of the health care law

Jul 2, 2012

The Supreme Court's decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act was the subject of a symposium in Buffalo Friday. Panelists agreed the high court's ruling does not guarantee the law's future.

During oral arguments in front of the Supreme Court, attorneys spent just 50 words on whether or not the health care law is a tax. That ended up being the crux of Justice John Roberts opinion to uphold the law.

All around the country, the Supreme Court's decision upholding the Affordable Care Act has its supporters and detractors, and New York state is no different.

The Supreme Court's decision on the Affordable Care Act of course comes in an election year, and politicians around the country are trying to read the tea leaves about the political fallout.

Karen Dewitt / NYS Public Radio

New York’s politicians and major health care providers are largely applauding the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold President Barack Obama’s health care law.  Meanwhile, an Albany Law School expert says Chief Justice John Roberts may have been concerned about his legacy, and that was a factor in his decision.

After the Supreme Court ruled on the Affordable Care Act, Republicans and Democrats alike have been trying to figure how to move forward in the fight over health care policy, including this regions's members of Congress.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Doctors in central New York are reacting to the Supreme Court decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act. They are generally pleased with the decision -- although there are some concerns.

Three community health centers in central and northern New York are receiving grants from the federal government as part of the federal health care law.

The Roman Catholic Church continues it's opposition to the Affordable Care Act clause that requires employers to pay for birth control, a practice the church opposes.  But the fight has gone beyond the confines of the Catholic Church.

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