AIDs

ACR Health Prevention Services in Syracuse is looking for ways to reduce HIV and hepatitis C infection rates in New York state prisons.

According to federal statistics, inmates have the highest rate of HIV in New York, compared to any other state, and many of those inmates are  co-infected with hepatitis C. To fight that, the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS has a campaign that emphasizes public awareness, education and access to testing and treatment.  

This week: the respiratory virus affecting many children

Sep 20, 2014

Children with cold symptoms don’t need emergency medical care, says Dr. Jana Shaw, an associate professor of pediatrics specializing in infectious disease at the Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital.

She advises parents to keep careful watch of a sick child, especially if he or she has asthma, and seek care if the child develops trouble breathing.

Enterovirus D68 is the highly contagious respiratory infection that is making children sick across the United States and was detected in New York earlier this month. “It’s likely to spread and become an epidemic,” Shaw says.

World Bank Photo Collection

Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently announced a plan he hopes will end the AIDS epidemic in New York state by the year 2020, but much of what’s involved in the three-point program is already being done.

The governor's program is called “Bending the Curve," and concentrates on three things: identifying people who test HIV positive; linking those people to healthcare and connecting them to anti-HIV therapy to prevent further transmission; and stopping high-risk behavior among others to keep them HIV negative.

This week: reducing complications in diabetes

May 30, 2014

The sharp reduction in diabetic complications is encouraging news for more than 21 million Americans who have been diagnosed with the disease. Federal researchers recently showed about 2/3 fewer heart attacks, 50 percent fewer strokes and amputations, and 30 percent fewer incidents of kidney failure among people with diabetes over the past two decades.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

ACR Health in Syracuse is hoping a successful nutrition program can be expanded to serve others in the community, but right now its nutritional education program currently only has funding to serve clients with HIV/AIDS.

Brian Cowden, 50, has been living with HIV since he was 19. On medication to control the disease, Cowden says he never felt good, complaining of gastrointestinal problems, migraines, sleep issues. But after joining ACR Health’s nutritional program, that all went away.

Half the people who contract HIV in the United States are African-American, according to statistics released last year. Advocates hope  National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, which is today, leads to more education about the disease in the black community.  Locally, there will be a push to do just that in Syracuse this weekend.

Advancements in AIDS treatment means that people with the illness are living longer than ever. That means they need to take better care of their long-term health. A new program for AIDS patients in the north country focuses on improving their nutrition.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

World AIDS Day was remembered in Syracuse this morning during a service of remembrance. Participants say they are worried that the disease, which has been around for over 30 years now, has become forgotten.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

All of New York state is now covered by a needle exchange program sponsored by the state health department.

Syracuse was one of the last communities to join the  program, and so far, it's working well.

The program's big silver van has a small sign that says, “Safety First: Syringe Exchange Program.” This is where IV drug users and others can exchange their dirty needles for  clean ones.