Alzheimer's disease

Communication can frustrate a person with Alzheimer’s disease and his or her family and caregivers, but there are ways to help, says Katrina Skeval, chief program officer for the Alzheimer’s Association Central New York chapter.

Dr. Michael Weiner encourages people to take free brain function tests on the website he created. He hopes to use the registry to find candidates for Alzheimer’s treatment trials.

Weiner, who earned his medical degree at Upstate Medical University in 1965, is a professor at the University of California, San Francisco. In this interview, he explains how Alzheimer’s disease differs from normal memory loss.

Some forgetfulness is part of normal aging, but memory loss severe enough to interfere with your daily life could be a sign of Alzheimer’s disease -- the most common form of dementia.

Cathy James is the chief executive officer of the Alzheimer's Association of Central New York. She describes what this incurable disease does to patients and their families, gives an update on research and offers some healthy living tips that might lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

People with Type 1 diabetes would not have to check their blood sugar levels 12 times a day or worry about wild fluctuations while they slept if an experimental bionic pancreas works as designed, says Dr. Ruth Weinstock, medical director of Upstate Medical University's Joslin Diabetes Center.

"It's not a cure, but it's definitely a step forward," Dr. Weinstock says.

This week, how the artificial pancreas works.

This week: the prevalence of depression

Aug 29, 2014

“Like any other form of medical illness or disease, major depressive disorder results in a good deal of suffering, incapacity and, often, vocational disability,” says psychiatrist Ronald Pies, a professor at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse and Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston.

About one in 14 adults in the United States are depressed. That is about 16 million Americans. In addition, some 2 million adolescents from age 12 to 17 deal with depression. Pies says people with depression are at increased risk for cardiovascular disorders, diabetes and suicide.