Arts

Arts and culture

Last December, the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse hired a new executive director, Elizabeth Dunbar.  She inherited a difficult financial situation, and has been serving double duty as the museum's temporary curator.  Host Grant Reeher engages her in a discussion of the challenges facing the museum, her strategies for renewed financial and artistic vibrancy, and the cultural function of an art museum in a small city. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

As workers begin the job of demolishing much of the dated interior of the Hotel Syracuse, the historic parts of the hotel are being preserved -- including one piece of artwork that once dominated the lobby of the landmark hotel.

Photographer captures Utica's heart and soul

Feb 14, 2015
Arian Horbovetz / ariandavidphotography

A Rochester wedding photographer recently trained his lens on a different kind of subject. Now he finds himself one of the most talked about people in the Mohawk Valley.  

Arian Horbovetz photographs weddings for a living. But sometimes, he says, that’s not enough.

“My belief is if you are going to do art for an income then you also have to break away from that construct and do art for the sake of art occasionally,” said Horbovetz.

Watertown is hosting the first Snowtown Film Festival this weekend. It's one of the few indoor events in a series of winter activities that are part of this month’s Snowtown USA festival. Fourteen films with winter themes will be screened in a full day marathon this Saturday. A majority of them are written and directed by local filmmakers.

O World of Photos / via Flickr

Oneida County is using some its share in revenue from the Turning Stone casino to fund arts and science programs.

Oneida County is receiving a $2.5 million annual cut of the Turning Stone profits. That’s through a revenue sharing deal between the Oneida Indian Nation that runs the casino and New York state.

County Executive Anthony Picente has proposed using those funds for downtown development, infrastructure upgrades, public safety, and arts and science.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

It’s been a long time coming for Kathleen DiScenna to get the "magic key to the magic house of Oz." It's really just a screwdriver "until we get our grants and re-do the doors and locks," she explained.

The large Neal House, at 678 West Onondaga Street in Syracuse, was built in 1871. But it’s fallen into disrepair, with broken windows, peeling paint and crumbling fireplaces. No Wicked Witch lived here, but the house on the West Side of Syracuse holds a lot of importance to fans of the Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its author.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

It’s a rainy late fall day in New York City and the Metropolitan Museum of Art is crowded. Even Walter Liedtke, one of the museum’s curators, has to vie for viewing space. As he tells the story of a once debated Rembrandt painting, he has to shuffle to the side to make room for some patrons.

"I can’t really see it on the surface, but in X-rays there’s been a lot of discussion as to whether this picture was longer on the bottom," he described, before being interrupted.

Studying the weaves of the canvas is done by shooting x-rays through the layers of paint and exposing what’s behind the image most only glance at on the wall.

Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Join us this Sunday at 7:00p.m. for a special look at the holiday and some tips for your feast.

This one-hour radio special, hosted by Dan Pashman of The Sporkful podcast, Cooking Channel’s You’re Eating It Wrong and the new book, Eat More Better: How to Make Every Bite More Delicious, is an entertaining combination of in-studio interviews, listener calls, and in-kitchen segments with food and drink experts, as well as some of public radio’s favorite personalities. You’ll learn useful tips about how to make classic Thanksgiving dishes, interesting facts about the science of cooking and the art of eating, and surprising details about the ways in which diverse cultures have adapted Thanksgiving traditions and made them their own.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO

This summer, the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute is hosting an exhibition featuring some of the world's greatest European painters, from Rembrandt to Rubens, called The "Golden Age of European Painting."

It isn't long after stepping foot into the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute that one sees why the city of Utica is excited to show off its most recent art exhibit, including the "Portrait of Madame Adelaide."
 

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

A new workshop is getting ready to open in Syracuse. It’ll be a place, known as a "makerspace," for anyone to come and sculpt, cut, weld or print.

Michael Giannattasio is a sculptor and metal worker by trade, but he knows his way around a 3-D printer, too. There are a couple set up in what Giannattasio refers to as the "clean space" in an old Syracuse factory building.

For the past month, members of the Oswego community have been rehearsing a historical play based on real events, commemorating the 200th anniversary of the area's involvement in the war of 1812. WRVO's Mark Lavonier met with members of the production team to learn more about the play.

The play "The Great Rope" will be performed inside the grounds of Fort Ontario tonight at 6pm in Oswego.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

The village of Chittenango has transformed into the Land of Oz this weekend for its annual celebration of the Wizard of Oz and its creator.

The town is marking a special anniversary with a record setting attempt. Hundreds of people will gather today at the Chittenango High School dressed as characters from the Wizard of Oz. They’re trying to set the world record for most people to do so in one place. England holds that title right now.

A recent survey shows that people in central New York region want to take part in arts and cultural events, but often don’t know about them. That's spurring the group CNY Arts to find ways to solve that problem.

Keeping the craft of instrument making alive

May 10, 2014
Noelle Evans/WXXI

John Delmonico works at a small violin shop on East Avenue in Rochester, continuing a tradition that dates back to the 16th century.

"You know it's something we don't hear about that much anymore," said Delmonico, who began working at Sullivan Violins five years ago.

“Really, the story is I couldn't find a teaching job and I needed a job.”

He’s a classically-trained cellist with a background in music education. He started out as an office clerk at Sullivan’s, but soon took an interest in how the instruments were built and maintained.

Civil War photographer's work displayed in Syracuse

Apr 26, 2014
Tom Magnarelli / WRVO

An exhibition at the Onondaga Historical Association Museum in downtown Syracuse displays the work of 19th century photographer George Barnard. Barnard kept studios in Syracuse and Oswego and took some of the first photographs there in the 1850s.

Bob Wysocki

There's a place at Syracuse University where art meets science. The Lava Project has been fusing the two disciplines for four years now, and soon anyone can get in on the collaboration, through a free online course.

For the scientist, creating lava and watching it flow means to “understand how lava behaves and what it means when we have certain structures in lava flows, what controls that.”

Two plays are the thing in Oswego

Feb 26, 2014

A group of up and coming actors are performing two plays rarely produced together as part of a nationwide tour stopping at SUNY Oswego. On Wednesday night, The Acting Company will perform Hamlet, then tomorrow the group of 12 repertory actors will perform Tom Stoppard's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead." The shows follow the same story line, but from different perspectives.

Josh Johnston, who fills several roles in the plays, says the group focuses on giving the audience universally relatable moments.

via Flickr. Some rights reserved by Zaqarbal

It’s not every day you come across a lost play from a master of 16th century literature.  But that’s what happened to a professor at Syracuse University’s department of languages, literatures and linguistics.  

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

The Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse has canceled two big exhibits in 2014 in an effort to stymie a large operating budget.

The museum lost $135,000 in 2013. Even by canceling two traveling exhibits slated for April and October, the museum’s leadership still predicts being in the red a total of $500,000 by the end of 2014.

The decision to cancel the exhibits was made at a board meeting this week. Had they not aborted on the two exhibits, the estimated deficit would have been $750,000.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO

A new play in Syracuse deals with one young adult's experience living with cancer with the goal of raising money for charity and bringing awareness to young adults who have the disease.

Jesse Pardee, 22, received her first dose of chemotherapy five years ago on Christmas Eve after being diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma, a cancer of the pelvis.

"My family's memories are probably worse than mine of that first weekend because I was drugged up," she recalled. "It was all a blur for me."

Looking at video games as art

Nov 8, 2013
Tom Magnarelli/WRVO

A new exhibition at the Everson Museum examines the 40 year evolution of video games as an art form. The unusual exhibit showcases the technology, culture and the different traditional types of art in video games.

The sounds of an arcade echo throughout the galleries of the Everson Museum. From Atari's Space Invaders to the immersive environment of Playstation 3's Flower, where the player is the wind, "The Art of Video Games" features 80 games that tell the history of the medium.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO

For the last few years, graffiti artists have been going to an empty building on Syracuse's Near West Side, where they can paint without fear of legal hassle. But while dozens of artists have used this building as their outlet, has it helped decrease the amount of illegal graffiti citywide?

The smells and sounds of spray paint fill the air surrounding the vacant structure at then end of Tully Street, as two men paint thin blue lines while another paints a large, pink alien holding a laser gun.

An outlet to paint

Light Work gallery celebrates 40 years

Sep 20, 2013
Tom Magnarelli/WRVO

For forty years, the nonprofit photography gallery Light Work has been bringing photographers from around the world to Syracuse through its residency program. A new exhibition at Syracuse University celebrates that anniversary by showcasing one photographer from each year.  

The first artist-in-residence at Light Work, was Charles Gatewood who photographed the New York State Fair when he was in Syracuse. His black and white portrait of the human pincushion at a sideshow is part of the exhibition “40 Artists - 40 Years.”

Gino Geruntino/WRVO

The steady loss of manufacturing jobs in upstate cities has caused a similar decline in their downtown areas. But cities like Syracuse are hoping to change that perception through art revitalization projects aimed at promoting the city's center while beautifying neighborhoods.

Tom Magnarelli/WRVO

A photography exhibition at The Tech Garden in downtown Syracuse commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Finnish migration to the United States.  And one of the goals is to reestablish a connection between Syracuse and its sister city in Finland, which began more than 20 years ago.

The pictures of people and architecture that line the halls of The Gallery at The Tech Garden look like they’re from the same place. But half were taken in Finland and the other half in America where Finnish people settled, mainly in the Great Lakes region.

Loren & Mark

International acoustic guitar duo Loren Barrigar and Mark Mazengarb have been traveling around the state performing dates on WRVO's MemberCard Thank You! Tour. WRVO's Mark Lavonier recently spoke with the award-winning musicians, and asked about their growing fanbase and impact on the region.

elh70 / via Flickr

It looks like The Sound Garden, a popular new and used music and videogame store in downtown Syracuse, will be staying put after all.

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner Friday afternoon announced a deal has been reached on proposed legislation that would exempt games, videos and music from the provisions of the city's new secondhand dealer law.

Those provisions had forced the owner of the store to make plans to close down the Armory Square fixture. The Sound Garden has a second location in Baltimore, Md.

What function do staged plays serve in our society? A critical one for civilization itself, argues Tim Bond in this week's edition of the Campbell Conversations.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

For the first time since before the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra went bankrupt two years ago, musicians will play a full season of symphonic music. The Symphoria's "Music in the Key of CNY" series marks a big moment for the fledgling musical group.

Artists in central New York will try to bring their craft to the masses during a new art festival and conference slated for late September.

Pages