birds

In this archived broadcast from June 29, 1990, John Weeks talks about tulip trees and the Baltimore oriole. He gives a brief history of both species and their modern day roles in the natural world.

In this archived broadcast from June 25, 1992, John Weeks speaks about bird songs and their qualities.  Songs by different species of thrush, wrens, thrasher and others are interspersed throughout the talk.  Weeks examines each song, touching on qualities such as tone and energy.

A Study in Bird Nesting

Jun 8, 2016
Dan Dangler / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 10, 1993, John Weeks discusses the observations he made during a study of a local wetland.  These observations include several notes on the nesting habits of over a dozen different bird species. 

Changes in Birdwatching

Jun 3, 2016
Keith Williams / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 4, 1992, John Weeks discusses some observations in migration patterns he has witnessed while bird watching and offers a metaphor involving his daughter moving to a new home.

Flying Architects

Jun 1, 2016
Henry T. McLin / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 7, 1991, John Weeks discusses nature's flying architects, commonly known as birds.  Weeks covers the nest building of several species including Baltimore orioles and hummingbirds.

Strange Sounds of Nature

May 20, 2016
Tom Moseley / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 21, 2004, John Weeks reviews the strange sounds one might hear on a spring evening.  Weeks goes into depth on the calls of the pie-billed grebe, the woodcock, the rough grouse and more.

Thank you for your interest in David Sibley's visit to Syracuse. Unfortunately, tickets are sold out. Please call (315) 312-3690 to be added to our waiting list.

Len Blumin / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from May 13, 2005, John Weeks discusses the ivory-billed woodpecker.  Weeks goes over the bird's history and its appearance's rarity.

Brian Rogers / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 25, 2003, John Weeks discusses how spending his youth on a farm shaped his love of sparrows.  Weeks talks about his own enjoyment of the bird and describes how to find them in order to listen to their songs.

In this archived broadcast from April 18, 1987, John Weeks continues to discuss his trip on the East Coast.  Weeks discusses his visit Bombay Hook, touching on the wildlife he spotted and giving a brief history of the refuge.

Migration through Montezuma

Apr 9, 2016
Andy Saunders

If you drive on the New York State Thruway between Syracuse and Rochester you'll go right through the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, a huge wetland that every spring is filled with large flocks of migrating waterfowl and other birds. David Chanatry of the New York Reporting Project at Utica College recently visited the refuge and spoke with Chris Lajewski, the director of the Audubon Center.

The Goldfinch

Aug 30, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 31, 1990, John Weeks talks about the hatching season of birds. He goes into detail on the Goldfinch and how they play a role in the environment. He also talks about the uniqueness of this bird and how and why it is different from others.

In this archived broadcast from July 26, 1991, John Weeks talks about how birds and insects are great nesters and how they are the greatest architects. He speaks about mostly birds and how they build their birds nest how they are all unique and different. Every bird and insect has a different taste so depending on the type of bird or insect the nest or "home" is different and Weeks goes into detail about that. 

Abundance at Sunrise

May 27, 2015

In this archived broadcast from  July, 6, 1990 John Weeks talks about the sunrise and how he gets up early to look at the birds. He talks about how the sunrise is the most important part of the day and what he enjoys about it. He narrates his morning and the birds that he seeing such as the sparrows that nest by his home.

In this archived broadcast from May 25, 1990, John Weeks talks about he talks about how the birds of the spring prepare for the summer and how they nest. He also talks about the song of the birds. He goes into detail about a time that he was bird watching and examined certain birds.

In this archived broadcast from March 6, 1987, John Weeks talks about bird watchers and how and why they observe birds. He talks about how a winter bird walk or watch is different than one in the summer and spring because there are different birds and nesting techniques. He also goes into detail on how winter birds are different than

spring and summer birds. He talks about their feeding and nesting techniques.

In this archived broadcast from June 18, 1992, John Weeks talks about the sounds that different birds make and what each sound actually means to that bird and fellow birds around it. He talks about how every bird's sound is unique and what makes them different.

On Crows and Fawns

Apr 29, 2015

In this archived broadcast from June 22, 1990, John Weeks talks about the walks that he has and what he has seen. He says that every walk is different and he never knows what he is going to find. He goes into detail about crows and fawns and what makes them unique. He says that birds are constantly surprising him. He speaks about what he saw on his walk through the Baltimore Woods and what surprised him.

Natural Insect Control

Apr 27, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 10, 1984, John Weeks talks about the art of a bird watcher. He goes into detail about different birds and how they all eat and feed off of different insects. He talks about how birds will change the insects that they eat depending on the season.

Spring A Dialogue

Apr 24, 2015

In this archived broadcast from April 19, 1991, John Weeks follows a dialogued format where he talks about how much he loves the spring and how he is not that interested in winter because he is old and looses track of things. He talks about his childhood and an illness in the spring that his mother was going through. He talks about what he used to do during the spring when he was younger and why it is his favorite time of year.

In this archived broadcast from August 9, 1990, John Weeks talks about how birds and sunflowers interconnect. He also talks about the dynamics of sunflowers and what they provide to our lives. He talks about different type of sunflowers and what makes them unique.

John Weeks takes a walk through the woods and describes the different birds he hears and what their songs mean. He discusses the different pitches of the birds as they interact with each other.

John Weeks talks about different kinds of birds, especially robins, and the fruits they eat. Fruit is important this time of year as a main source for the energy they need to migrate in the Fall. Their behavior changes towards the end of the summer as they prepare for their long flight.

Natural Insect Control

Aug 11, 2014

John Weeks discusses different kinds of birds and their foraging habits that he witnesses in his own yard. He talks about how many trips they make in a day from their nest to the yard and how with each trip, they are acting as a form of insect control. He argues that birds are better to depend on for insect control because insects do not develop an immunity to them.

John Weeks tells a story about a woman who found a Heron in her yard. He talks about the various types of Herons which are often unknown by many people. Each Heron differs in size and color to help it blend in to specific surroundings.

In this archived broadcast from September 11, 1992, John Weeks talks about waking up early one morning and how he wanted to see what difference a shift of 12 degrees in latitude would make. Weeks said that he woke up too early and that the stars were still shining in the sky but eventually the fog and dew were heavy enough to blur the street lights. He talks about the different sounds that he hears from the birds as well as the grasshoppers and the flowers that he sees.

eugene beckes / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 18, 1992, John Weeks talks about the sound that birds make and how you can hear them everywhere. He especially talks about a tiny,  energetic bird called a wren. He mentions the kinglet as well. Both these birds are very high pitched. The wren is a retiring bird and they have a long song. Weeks then talks about what he is seeing and what the wren looks like.

Jerine Lay / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from June 4, 1992, John Weeks begins by saying that him and his one friend dedicate one day in May to capture the homeward movement of bird life every year. He talks about how there are all different types of birds and they all move to different locations based on the change in weather. He then compares his daughter moving to a new setting to birds migrating when they have to go find a new home somewhere.

The Sunflowers of Summer

Apr 17, 2014
Doug88888 / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from  August 8, 1990, John Weeks talks about how different types of flowers bloom because of different seasons and that throughout the different seasons things change. He also goes into how the haying and cropping is dangerous for the different birds but once certain flowers gain the land such as sunflowers you do not see as many issues. Towards the end of the broadcast Weeks describes the 10 different tribes that are also some of the different flowers and how they are categorized.

The Sunflowers of Summer

Apr 17, 2014
Doug88888 / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from  August 8, 1990, John Weeks talks about how different types of flowers bloom because of different seasons and that throughout the different seasons things change. He also goes into how the haying and cropping is dangerous for the different birds but once certain flowers gain the land such as sunflowers you do not see as many issues. Towards the end of the broadcast Weeks describes the 10 different tribes that are also some of the different flowers and how they are categorized.

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