birds

Christina Rutz / Flickr

This archived broadcast is from June 5, 1987. Weeks starts by saying this is the time of year for young wildlife to appear. He says you see more adults with their young especially in birds. Adult birds and mammals rarely abandon their young. Weeks mentions that birds should be left alone and not bothered when they are still young. Then he talks about mammals and how their survival rates are higher.

Wishing In Spring

Mar 6, 2014

In this archived broadcast, Wishing In Spring, from March 16, 1984, John Weeks talks about what it is like to have spring like weather. He says he is sitting down on a warm day wishing it was spring in late March. He talks about how spring is different in all different states that he's visited and the different almanac's that people can bring. He describes the day outside and how it will be different once spring finally arrives.

This archived broadcast, A Reprise On Roadside Viewing of Wildlife, from John Weeks',  Nature of Things, talks about a trip that he likes to take. Weeks says that he makes weekly trips to the Cayuga Nature Center on the west side of Cayuga lake and north of Ithaca. He talks about how he like's to get up  early and go and eat his breakfast on the way since there are many different things that he notices. Weeks' talks about during mid January the days are lengthened and there are birds everywhere as well as the different waterfall viewing that he notices.

This archived broadcast, A Reprise On Roadside Viewing of Wildlife, from John Weeks',  Nature of Things, talks about a trip that he likes to take. Weeks says that he makes weekly trips to the Cayuga Nature Center on the west side of Cayuga lake and north of Ithaca. He talks about how he like's to get up  early and go and eat his breakfast on the way since there are many different things that he notices. Weeks' talks about during mid January the days are lengthened and there are birds everywhere as well as the different waterfall viewing that he notices.

The Horned Lark

Feb 27, 2014
Kenneth Cole Schneider / Flickr

In this archived broadcast, The Horned Lark, John Weeks talks about roadside bird watchers but focuses on one bird in particular. The horned lark is a brown and white bird that has dark horns, yellow throat, white face and white margins on its dark tail. He talks about how exciting these birds are to watch and how you can even find them especially during the winter. He talks about the different populations of them throughout the four seasons and tells all about the different nests that they have.

This archived broadcast, Phantoms of the Marsh, is from October 4, 1990 by John Weeks. In this broadcast Weeks talks about when he was at Cornell he would make frequent trips to a marsh south of Ithaca. He would go during all different seasons and he described the marsh as a dark, mysterious jungle. In this broadcast he talks about the different animals that he see's especially during May and June when there are plenty of birds around.

Winter crows invade Watertown

Nov 11, 2013
Joanna Richards

Every winter, Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror movie, “The Birds” gets a replay in Watertown. But not on the silver screen. Thousands of crows fly in from the countryside to roost overnight. The city's trying to evict them. 

The Legend & Audubon

Oct 29, 2013

John Weeks discusses his reaction to an article in The National Inquirer about Audubon. The article talks about pioneer Audubon killing thousands of birds for sport. Many were shocked by this startling revelation but because Weeks has read portions of Audubon’s diaries in the past he was not surprised at all. It is hard to put ourselves in the lives of a pioneer during hunting season in the 1780s. Living in an era where hunting skill was vital to successful living Audubon’s actions were typical of his day though.


Four years after their first interview, John Weeks sits down with Douglas Whitman again to discuss the research and purpose behind Bird Banding.

John Weeks talks with his guest Douglas Whitman about the process of banding birds.

John Weeks goes on a spring time journey. He takes us on a tour to the country side and examines wildlife in his favorite areas.

Evening Pond Watch

Oct 19, 2012

Weeks recounts a walk along Rice Pond and the interlacing of the sounds coming from various species of waterfowl. He also provides information regarding the colorful ensembles sported by different types of birds that were seen on the hike.

Outside Influences

Oct 12, 2012

John Weeks discusses the influence of the moon on bird migration and reproduction. He explains how day length have been demonstrated to trigger reproductive cycles and stimulate hormone production.

John Weeks talks about the parallel between the operation of a wild thing and the function of a computer chip. Weeks makes the point that in both cases, a lot of what happens may be the result of stored messages or directives, as in the case of bird migration.

Weeks discusses watching wetland wildlife as a younger man and his growing interest in waterfowl. He talks in depth about the mallard and the interbreeding between the mallard and the black duck.

From birds using celestial navigation, to salmon using chemical sensors to "smell" their way home, John Weeks discusses the migration phenomenon of various species. Weeks notes that many migration patterns hold mysteries that are still unexplained.

John Weeks recounts the delicate choral movements that can be heard when listening to, what he calls, a "symphony" of bird sounds. He urges us to seek out the dawn and dusk choruses while they still ring out, before they fade away forever.

John Weeks discusses the appearance of young Screech Owls. Normally hatching in early June, by Independence Day these fuzzy small owls begin venturing out of the nest. Weeks explains the interesting (and often aggressive) life style of the Screech Owl and how to get a better view of these monogamous creatures.

Originally aired July 10, 1987.

John Weeks reflects on how hayfields have changed since his youth on the family farm. While the technology of haying has evolved dramatically, hayfields still serve as a home for a wide variety of wildlife.

Originally aired on June 17, 1988.

Powerline Bird Watching

Jun 20, 2012

John Weeks explains that keeping an eye out for birds while driving can be both relaxing and informative. The power lines bordering highways provide an abundance of opportunities to sight beautiful birds. Bird watching in the car can be a good way to observe local nature without trekking through rough terrain.

John Weeks discusses the many unusual ways birds construct makeshift nests in the spring. Weeks shares stories of birds using "wildlife ad-libbing" to survive in inhospitable weather.

Paco Lyptic via Flickr

Every spring, a state Department of Environmental Conservation biologist drives along north country highways at dawn or dusk, stopping every so often to pull over and listen to the nature sounds.

She's listening for the distinctive “peent” of the singing American woodcock, a brown speckled bird a little larger than a songbird with a long, narrow beak for pulling earthworms out of the newly thawed ground.

John Weeks talks about the new blooming flowers and plants of spring and how to fully enjoy the start of the new season.

Originally aired on April 21st, 1989.

John Weeks talks about his experience with crows and great horned owls one day in the woods and the unique birds' reactions to each other's appearances.

 

Originally aired on April 25th, 1987.

John Weeks talks about what usually happens during the first week after birth in the season of spring. Some birds tend to leave their young for a short time and some never leave their side. Weeks talks about being careful with baby nestlings and mammals and to leave them alone because their adult protectors could get angry.

John Weeks talks about some of the National Wildlife refugees along the East Coast in Virginia, Maryland and Delaware. Weeks shares his experiences of the sprouting spring life he discovered on his voyage and the different types of birds he viewed in places such as Bombay Hook in Delaware.

 

Originally aired on April 18th, 1987

100 Miles Of Spring

Apr 3, 2012

John Weeks talks about animal preparations for Spring and how they react to Oswego's different  weather daily. He also discusses birds' arrival in spring g from his own experiences, including the Woodcock.

 

Originally aired on April 3rd, 1987.

John Weeks tells all about winter birds and the many that are often found on roadsides. Different type of winter birds go unnoticed, Weeks discusses the numerous type of birds spotted all over the country through the cold season.

Originally aired March 6th, 1987.

Spring Time Birds

Mar 6, 2012

John Weeks talks about a range of birds from robins to bluebirds and how they're appearance and singing gives us hint that spring is just around the corner.

Originally aired March 7th, 1986.

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