body image

Workman Publishing

Today in our latest in health segment: the ways in which we see ourselves.

Going gray is a natural part of most people's lives. There comes a time, often earlier in life than you'd think, where the pigment of your hair begins to change. So why all the fuss over covering it up? Some think that gray hair make them look older than they are. Some think that the color makes their complexion drab. But does it? We'll explore the idea of letting nature take its course when it comes to your hair.

Christine Hewitt

Yoga is depicted in pop culture as a physical exercise trend involving elaborate poses, performed with grace and beauty, mainly by upper-class white people in stretchy pants. That fact is very much on the radar of our next guest.

Jessamyn Stanley, a yoga teacher, author and advocate, argues that yoga is so much more than the manufactured images we see on Instagram. She shared her thoughts on the spiritual and mental effects of yoga and the positive emotional impact it has had on her life. These ideas are also explored in her book "Every Body Yoga: Let Go of Fear, Get on the Mat, Love Your Body."

Take a look in the mirror. Are you beauty sick?

May 20, 2018
Sam Sanford / Flickr

In a society where celebrities’ weights make the covers of tabloids and every health magazine sells a new way to look beautiful, one author is working to turn that focus inward.

Renee Engeln is a professor in the department of psychology at Northwestern University and author of “Beauty Sick: How the Cultural Obsession with Appearance Hurts Girls and Women.” She spoke with us on “Take Care” to discuss why women are especially affected by society’s focus on physical beauty.

Accepting yourself: Aging and body image

May 17, 2018
Llima Orosa

This time on "Take Care," we take a look in the mirror (and, hopefully, a look inside ourselves). WRVO's health and wellness show is exploring body image, aging and acceptance this time around with a number of experts in these fields.

Cameron Harris/Flickr

The adage that a pear-shaped body is healthier than an apple-shaped body is prevalent in today’s health literature, but experts and research suggest that genes are to blame for the body types, and America’s cultural obsession with changing body shape is causing women in particular a lot of emotional and physical strain.

Take focus off body image and put it on enjoying life

Sep 24, 2016
Ashley Fisher / Flickr

As a woman, you may leave the house feeling great about how you look. Then you get somewhere and look around at other women in the room and suddenly feel not so great because you think they look better. The social anxiety of body image is something women have experienced for a long time, but may currently be at an all-time high.

This week on “Take Care,” Gina Barreca talks about the evolution of how body image became such a hot topic for women, and why it shouldn’t have to be. Barreca is a feminist theory and English professor at the University of Connecticut, a columnist for the Hartford Courant, and has appeared on the Today Show, CNN, NPR and Oprah to discuss gender, power, politics, and humor. She is also the author of “They Used to Call Me Snow White But I Drifted: Women’s Strategic Use of Humor” and "If You Lean In, Will Men Just Look Down Your Blouse?"