brain

11:00am

Fri October 3, 2014
Health

This week: bladder cancer, and a novel way of building a replacement bladder

Men diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer often face surgery to remove their diseased bladders and replace them with external bags. But some patients are candidates for a novel operation in which a replacement bladder is created from a length of their own intestine.

Allan Sustare, 63, of DeWitt has led a normal, active life since his surgery two years ago. “I count myself luckier than anybody I know,” he said.

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7:00pm

Sun September 7, 2014
Health

Understanding brain tumors

_DJ_

Brain cancer may not be as common as other forms of cancer, but over 200,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with brain tumors each year. 

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Tracy Batchelor discusses the kinds of brain tumors and the ways in which they are treated. Batchelor is professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and executive director at the Massachusetts General Hospital brain tumor center. Dr. Batchelor treated the late Sen. Ted Kennedy.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Batchelor.

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7:07am

Thu February 13, 2014
Health

Possible treatment for Parkinson's developed upstate

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Researchers in upstate New York have developed a new cell therapy that could treat Parkinson’s disease, a neurological disorder which affects motor function. The study from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggests this new approach could not only halt progression of the disease, but also reverse its impact on the brain.

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8:00am

Wed January 29, 2014
Health

Researchers pinpoint where in the brain Alzheimer's begins

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have used high resolution imaging to show that Alzheimer’s begins in a specific part of the brain, known as a gateway to the hippocampus.

Dr. Scott Small, co-author of the study, says this particular area plays a vital role in consolidating long term memories. The discovery could help with early diagnosis of the disease, and that, he says, could lead to more effective intervention.

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7:00pm

Sun November 24, 2013
Health

Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline

Liz Henry Flickr

Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Sherry Willis, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.

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7:01pm

Sun November 17, 2013
Health

With strokes, "time saved is brain saved"

gwire Flickr

While time is often a major factor in determining how much damage a medical ailment can cause, it is especially true with strokes. Under the right conditions, the reversibility of stroke symptoms can decrease by the minute. But why is the saying “time saved is brain saved” so important when it comes to strokes?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Larry Goldstein, discusses how to recognize a stroke, and why time is of the essence when it comes to treating them. Dr. Goldstein is a professor of neurology at Duke University and director of the Duke Comprehensive Stroke Center in North Carolina.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldstein.

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6:09am

Fri November 15, 2013
Health

Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke

Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.

Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?

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7:59am

Wed October 23, 2013
Technology

Upstate Medical University says new labs will promote brain research

Empty labs will soon become the home for more collaborative brain research.
Ellen Abbott WRVO

Upstate Medical University's new Neuroscience Research Building is on the cusp of bringing brain researchers together at last. The $72 million building is an expansion at Upstate's Institute for Human Performance.

VIPs toured the block-long, five-story building this week. At this point it's a shell, full of empty labs and dark rooms. It's the $50 million worth of high tech equipment coming later this year that'll make a difference in brain research, according to Upstate's Vice President for Research Rosemary Rochford.

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10:10am

Mon October 21, 2013
Health

Fear is in the mind of the beholder

charamelody Flickr

You’re watching a scary movie. As the suspense begins building, you notice that your heart rate increases, your pupils dilate, and you that you are beginning to sweat. Is it hot in the room? No, that’s not what’s causing it. What you’re experiencing is good ol’ fashioned fear.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Liz Phelps discusses two kinds of fear: real and fake. Dr. Phelps is the director of the Phelps Lab at NYU and a professor in psychology. Her research focuses on how human learning and memory are changed by emotion, and what neural systems mediate the interactions between the three.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Phelps.

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3:38pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Health

Images of the brain could unlock learning difficulties

Brain and cognitive sciences research assistants talk to 4-year-old Mason Ray
University of Rochester

Researchers in western New York have been using brain scans to add to our understanding of how humans comprehend numbers. The new data could have implications in diagnosing learning disabilities earlier on, and aid in our understanding of why some kids struggle at school.

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