brain training

DigitalRalph / Flickr

We can all be a bit forgetful sometimes, but when it becomes a life concerning issue, like dementia, there isn’t much that can be done in terms of treatment. However, new research suggests there may be action that can be taken in terms of prevention.

This week on “Take Care,” science and medical journalist Dan Hurley tells us how brain training games may lead to a significant reduction in risk for dementia. Hurley wrote the article, “Could Brain Training Prevent Dementia?” for the New Yorker on the study, and is the author of the book, “Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power.”

Can you train your brain to prevent dementia?

Oct 7, 2016

The debate over whether brain training games can help prevent dementia has gone back and forth over the last few years. This week, a review of the evidence concluded that the answer was no. But a study announced at the Alzheimer's Association meeting in July showed the games hold promise. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with medical journalist Dan Hurley, who wrote about the study for the New Yorker.

Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline

Nov 24, 2013
Liz Henry / Flickr

Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Sherry Willis, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.