Brian Reiger

While a new law in New York State puts more stringent rules in place for how school districts must deal with concussions suffered by student athletes, club sports aren't covered by any such regulations.  As WRVO's Ellen Abbott reports in the third part of a series, at least one central New York recreational league is trying to do something about it.

Doctor Brian Reiger sees kids suffering from concussions every day. He’s Director of the Concussion and Sports Concussion Program at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. 

“A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that is caused by a blow or a jolt to the head,” said Dr. Reiger. “It disrupts the brains function.  In most cases, the brain looks normal and we see no evidence of injury but we know it’s been injured because it’s not working properly.”

Reiger says while there is no test that determine whether someone has a concussion, there are signs and symptoms.

Carolyn Tangoran of Fayetteville suffered her first concussion as a competitive cheerleader.  She was at the base of a cheerleading stunt during practice, when it fell on her. 

"I didn't really say anything, because I just, you know, it truly is a very competitive sport, and I didn't want to step out for any reason," said Tangoran.

She kept on practicing and competing with the team.