cancer

Advances in the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer begins in laboratories. This week, we'll get an inside look at four different labs currently searching for answers.

First, a lab that explores how to determine which drugs will work best in each patient. Then, scientists Christopher Turner and Nicholas Deakin detail their search for ways to halt the spread of cancer. Next, how to better protect bone from radiation therapy during cancer treatments. And lastly, the best way to inhibit estrogen, which can trigger breast cancer in women after menopause.

Men diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer often face surgery to remove their diseased bladders and replace them with external bags. But some patients are candidates for a novel operation in which a replacement bladder is created from a length of their own intestine.

Allan Sustare, 63, of DeWitt has led a normal, active life since his surgery two years ago. “I count myself luckier than anybody I know,” he said.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

A ceremony in Syracuse Friday launched the new face of cancer treatment in central New York. The Upstate Cancer Center is ready for patients, and assistant director Dick Kilburg says its innovative design merges nature and advanced cancer-fighting technology.  
 

"Basically what we’re doing with this facility is bringing all the services under one roof, and being able to offer patients what they deserve in this community," Kilburg said. "All the extra services that a cancer center should be offering.”

This week: cancer care and nutritional issues

Jul 10, 2014

Medical director Dr. Leslie Kohman and others provide a preview of the Upstate Medical University Cancer Center, including advanced technologies, and services available for the youngest patients with cancer and blood disorders.

Then, registered dietitian Maria Erdman addresses nutritional issues that cancer patients may face.

Signs and symptoms of thyroid disease

Jun 22, 2014
IAEA ImageBank / Flickr

You’ve heard of the thyroid, but how much do you really know about it? 

This week on "Take Care,"  Dr. David Cooper explains the functions of the thyroid and the various diseases that it can harbor.  Cooper is the director of the Thyroid Clinic and professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. David Cooper.

Cancer can be brought under control in this century, the leader of the American Cancer Society said during a recent trip to Syracuse. More advocacy is key, said John Seffrin, the society’s chief executive officer.

“We have to have people speak up and say, ‘we need more money for research,’ ‘we need to insure that people are protected from second-hand smoke,’ and ‘we need to make sure that if someone has cancer, they get the care they need,’” Seffrin said.

Already, medical science knows how to prevent more than half of all cancers from occurring, Seffrin said.

While more Americans are being diagnosed with cancer now, more patients are being cured or living chronically with the disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Patricia Ganz, an oncologist and co-founder of the national coalition for cancer survivorship. Dr. Ganz discusses the many health issues that cancer survivors face, and how the medical community is working to address them.

Lorraine Rapp: When we use the term survivor, who are we talking about? Who is included in that group?

Answer to preventing illness may be in Vitamin D

May 18, 2014
Shezamm

Vitamin D is the vitamin most often associated with sunshine, but could it also be used to prevent cancer and heart disease?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University and chief of preventative medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, discusses how clinical trials could prove that Vitamin D could help prevent diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and cancer.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joann Manson.

Some rights reserved AJ Cann

Any diagnosis of cancer can be scary. But cancers of the head and neck bring unique challenges because of the importance of this region to the body. These cancers can impact a patient’s ability to speak, swallow or breathe.

A cancer diagnosis is never welcome. But cancers of the head and neck can be particularly difficult to diagnose and treat. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. David Pfister, the chief of the head and neck oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about the risk factors for these types of cancer.

Lorraine Rapp:  What are the most common forms of cancer that appear in the head and neck regions?

This week: new research in kidney cancer

May 2, 2014

According to research published in Urologic Oncology, some kidney cancer patients have better long-term survival odds when part of the kidney is removed, compared to patients who have the entire organ removed.

We'll discuss the findings and other treatment options for people with kidney cancer. More than 65,000 Americans were diagnosed with kidney cancer in 2013.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Upstate Medical University has a new tool that can help diagnose one of the most common cancers that strikes men. The hospital is one of the first in the nation to purchase a technology that gives doctors a more targeted approach in finding prostate cancer.

Jeff Barkley, a firefighter from Phoenix, had close family members die from prostate cancer. But even as his PSA level rose over the last several years -- that’s the blood test that is an indicator of prostate cancer -- five biopsies came back negative.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO

A new play in Syracuse deals with one young adult's experience living with cancer with the goal of raising money for charity and bringing awareness to young adults who have the disease.

Jesse Pardee, 22, received her first dose of chemotherapy five years ago on Christmas Eve after being diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma, a cancer of the pelvis.

"My family's memories are probably worse than mine of that first weekend because I was drugged up," she recalled. "It was all a blur for me."

Bosc d'Anjou / Flickr

Chemicals used in the process of hydraulic fracturing can disrupt the body’s normal hormone function according to new research published recently in the Journal of Endocrinology.

The study looked at Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) involved in drilling. Results showed that hormone disrupting activity was higher in water samples taken from drill sites where spills had occurred, compared to sites where little or no drilling had occurred.  

At certain levels of exposure, EDCs have been associated with cancer and infertility in adults.

tyfn / Flickr

Chemotherapy is one of the best known forms of cancer treatment, and while often effective, it can leave behind a number of side effects, like hair loss and nausea. Some who have undergone chemotherapy also have claimed to have felt foggy, forgetful and not as sharp as they were before the treatment. Largely ignored by the medical community in the past, this symptom, which is referred to as “chemo brain,” is finally starting to come to the forefront in medical research.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Michelle Janelsins talks about the research she and others are now conducting on chemo brain. Janelsins is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery, Cancer Control at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, where she got her PhD.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Janelsins.

Chemotherapy can cause many side effects like hair loss and nausea. But for years, many cancer patients have said it causes something else, forgetfulness and memory loss, or what cancer survivors call "chemo brain." Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Michelle Janelsins of the University of Rochester, who is leading a research study into chemotherapy's effects on cognitive function.

Lorraine Rapp: The term “chemo brain” is relatively new. How do researchers and medical doctors actually define that term?

The ABCDEs of melanoma

Jul 21, 2013
Leah Landry / WRVO

Melanoma has been on the rise in recent years. Why is that and how can we protect ourselves? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about the most serious form of skin cancer.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

Brian Vick/University of Rochester

Researchers in upstate New York have identified the chemical that leads to cancer resistance in laboratory animals: naked mole rats.

The discovery could eventually lead to new cancer treatments and even the ability for cancer resistance in humans according to the authors.

Prostate cancer: when to screen?

Apr 26, 2013

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men. But many of those malignancies develop so slowly, the patient is never effected by it. That fact has started a debate over who to screen for the disease, and when. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's weekly health show "Take Care" spoke with Dr. Anthony Scalzo, a medical oncologist at Hematology/Oncology Associates of Central New York, about how men should deal with this issue.

Researchers at Upstate Medical Center are helping in a nationwide study that could change the way people are screened for colon cancer, and the potential to change the way one of the most dreaded medical screening tests is used.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Some central New York cancer patients have signed their name to the new Upstate Cancer Center being to built next to University Hospital in Syracuse.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Construction has started in Syracuse on the $15 million Upstate Cord Blood Bank.  It will be the second public cord blood bank in New York state. The blood drawn from umbilical cords after childbirth is used to treat children with dozens of diseases like cancer and sickle cell anemia.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The first of 550 tons of steel beams has been pounded into the foundation of the new Upstate Cancer Center in Syracuse.  Up to now, most of the work has been prepping the area next to the existing hospital entrance.