cancer

A recent study showing that people with cancer were more likely to survive when they had social interaction with other cancer patients during chemotherapy did not surprise Dr. Kaushal Nanavati, the medical director of integrative therapy at the Upstate Cancer Center.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

State lawmakers and volunteer firefighters are putting pressure on Gov. Andrew Cuomo to sign a bill that would provide better coverage for volunteers who develop cancer because of the job they do.

Brian McQueen has been a longtime volunteer with the Whitesboro Fire Department. When he was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma several years ago, he was forced to take on the cost of much of the treatment himself. He doesn’t want any other volunteers to have to face that.

This week: Medication mistakes, divorce impact and more

Aug 2, 2017

Four in 10 people do not take their medicine as prescribed, according to a recent survey by Excellus Blue Cross Blue Shield.

Luke Probst, the director of pharmacy at Upstate University Hospital, explains the details of medication adherence and medication compliance and the sorts of problems that can arise if drugs are not taken as prescribed on this week’s show. He also shares suggestions four ways people can remember to take their medications.

Also on the show: the impact of divorce on children and families, and a video project for end-stage cancer patients.

Naturopathic Doctor News and Review via Oregon State University / Flickr

The fight to cure cancer is backed by researchers, doctors, federal agencies, and even tech entrepreneurs. While small victories are won each day in labs and hospitals across the globe, the fact remains that there is no surefire way to cure cancer. There are promising new treatments, though, and many on the front lines dedicated to the cause.

Jacqueline Detwiler joins us this week on WRVO’s health and wellness show “Take Care” to speak about what the next steps are when it comes to finding a cure for cancer. She’s a journalist and the articles editor at Popular Mechanics magazine. Detwiler’s article “It’ll Take an Army to Kill the Emperor” (in the June 2017 edition of Popular Mechanics) is the result of three months immersed in the field of cancer research.

What's needed to disrupt cancer

Jul 7, 2017
Yale Rosen / Flickr

Finding a cure for cancer. It's been the dream of many -- from people affected by the disease, to scientists, and even presidents. Jacqueline Detwiler, articles editor for Popular Mechanics, spent three months immersed in the field of cancer research. She crossed the country to visit seven cancer institutes and interviewed 35 researchers. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Detweiler about what she learned about the future of treating cancer.

This week: Heart attack, hereditary cancers and HPV

Jul 4, 2017

A sudden reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle, such as happens in a heart attack, can permanently damage heart tissue. Swiftly seeking emergency medical care at the first sign of trouble can help minimize the damage, says Upstate cardiologist Robert Carhart Jr., MD.

Prostate cancer: what we know about screening

Jun 23, 2017

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men. But the recommendations about who should be screened for the disease have changed over the years, leading to some confusion. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, the chair of the U.S. preventive services task force, which released the most recent prostate cancer screening guidelines earlier this year.

This week: HIV, heart disease, and head and neck cancers

May 25, 2017

New York state has several efforts underway to curtail the HIV epidemic.

Upstate infectious disease expert Elizabeth Asiago-Reddy talks this week about the increased availability of HIV testing, treatment options for those who test positive,  and where to obtain medication that can reduce a person's risk of becoming infected.

PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, is available in Syracuse through Upstate's Immune Health Services, the Adolescent/Young Adult Specialized Care Center or the Onondaga County Sexually Transmitted Disease Center.

Cooling caps for chemotherapy

Apr 1, 2017
faungg's photos/flickr

Chemotherapy is one of the most effective ways of treating cancer, but it has some unfortunate side effect -- like hair loss. And for women, that side effect is frequently the most traumatic.

This week, assistant professor of medicine at the Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine and director of the Breast Cancer Prevention and High Risk Clinic Dr. Julie Nangia joins “Take Care” to discuss how women undergoing chemotherapy might be able to save their hair by wearing cooling caps.

pengrin™ / Flickr

One of the many disturbing side effects of cancer treatment is the hair loss that chemotherapy can cause. A recent clinical trial tested a new device that might help reduce hair loss -- scalp cooling caps. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the study's lead researcher, Dr. Julie Nangia, an assistant professor of medicine at the Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine, the director of the Breast Cancer Prevention and High Risk Clinic.

Genetics and cancer: why testing can aid prevention

Mar 11, 2017
lorna / Flickr

No one wants to talk about cancer. A disease that has taken the lives of so many, even the word itself has an ominous connotation. But as much as we don’t want to talk about it, new genetic technology suggests that starting the conversation about your family’s cancer history might be in everyone’s best interest.

In her new book, "A Cancer in the Family: Take Control of your Genetic Inheritance," Dr. Theodora Ross addresses how our family’s medical history plays a role in our health. To shed some light on the genetics of cancer, as well as genetic counseling, Ross spoke with “Take Care” to explain the importance of knowing your family history. Ross, a cancer geneticist, is director of University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center’s cancer genetics program.

Cancer and your family

Mar 10, 2017

Cancer is a scary word and people are often reluctant to talk about. That can make it difficult to find out about your family history of the disease. And even if you do know that many of your relatives have had cancer, would you get tested for it yourself? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Theodora Ross, who directs the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center's Cancer Genetics Program.

An injured athlete with cartilage damage used to try anti-inflammatory medicine, a brace or steroid injections. If those methods didn’t help, the athlete often had to live with pain. 

Today, some orthopedic surgeons offer cartilage preservation and restoration options. Dr. Todd Battaglia explains which types of injuries can be helped by a relatively new technique of transferring cartilage from one area of the body to another, or of transplanting cartilage from a deceased donor. He also tells how, in some cases, cartilage can be stimulated to regrow.

This week: treating eating disorders and more

Nov 30, 2016

This Sunday on "HealthLink on Air," radiation oncologist Dr. Michael Mix explains how stereotactic radiation can shorten treatment for some cancer patients. Plus, social worker Kathleen Deters-Hayes goes over treatment options for people with eating disorders.

Join us this Sunday, December 4 at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. for "HealthLink on Air" on WRVO.

This week: empathy, childhood cancer, holiday hazards

Nov 17, 2016

Establishing empathy for a patient can be tough for doctors under increasing time pressure. Yet empathy -- being able to see the world as the patient does -- can benefit both the patient and the doctor, says Dr. Louise Prince, an emergency physician at Upstate University Hospital.

Mecklenburg County / Flickr

The idea of cancer can make many of us uncomfortable, and with that discomfort can come uncertainty, and fears about our own mortality. But when a friend or relative is facing a diagnosis of cancer, that's when they need the most understanding and support.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mindy Greenstein, a cancer survivor herself, gives some advice on how to talk to someone who has cancer. Greenstein is a clinical psychologist, psycho-oncologist, and a consultant in the Department of Psychiatry at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. She's also the author of the book “The House on Crash Corner and Other Unavoidable Calamities.”

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Surrounded by dozens of central New York firefighters in Syracuse on Wednesday, Sen. Charles Schumer launched a push to create a national firefighter cancer registry.  

The idea is to get a closer look at a cancer risk Schumer said can be double that of others because of exposure to toxic chemicals.

It used to be a badge of honor for a firefighter to come back to the station with a dirty, charred uniform. No more, according to Syracuse firefighter Mike Valenti.

Not every breast lump is cancerous, but "unless we do imaging and, at times, even a biopsy, we won't know that it's not cancer," explains Upstate University Hospital's Dr. Sam Benjamin, a medical oncologist who specializes in chemotherapy and cancer care.

Rising costs make cancer fight feel unaffordable

Sep 24, 2016
Karuna EM / Flickr

A cancer diagnosis can be a “catastrophic event,” according to Dr. Greg Knight of the Levine Cancer Institute in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The disease itself is terrifying to face; however, Knight says patients are avoiding the reality because they are unsure how they will be able to afford treatments, medications and the impact the disease has on day-to-day life.

This week on “Take Care,” Knight, a clinical oncologist, shares the findings of his group’s study, titled “Financial Toxicity in Adults with Cancer, Adverse Outcomes and Potential,” as well as how the costs have changed and how patients can approach paying those costs.

The cost of treating cancer

Sep 23, 2016
kbrookes / Flickr

Treating cancer is only half the battle. For many patients, paying for that treatment can be just as difficult. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Greg Knight of the Levine Cancer Institute/Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. Dr. Knight’s study "Financial Toxicity in Adults with Cancer: Adverse Outcomes and Potential," was presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

There’s a new sound at the New York State Fair in Syracuse this year. The Upstate Medical University booth in the Science and Industry Building offers cancer survivors a chance to ring a bell to mark their accomplishment.

Nine-year old Madeleine Pointer was the first to ring the bell, a seven-year survivor of kidney cancer.

"It’s exciting to be the first to ring it,” Pointer said. 

Matt Capogreco of the Upstate Cancer Center said the bell sends a message.

According to Dr. Kaushal Nanavati, a person’s wellness depends not just on managing his or her diseases, but on getting into a routine that brings contentment and peace. Nanavati is a family practitioner and medical director of integrative therapy at Upstate Medical University.

Christopher Brown / Flickr

If you were asked what the best place for your cell phone is, you might say your pocket. But a recent study has shown keeping your cell phone on your person may be connected to certain types of cancer.

This week on “Take Care,” journalist Dina Fine Maron shares the findings of this study. Maron’s article, “Major Cell Phone Radiation Study Reignites Cancer Questions,” appeared in Scientific Americanin May 2016. Maron is an award winning journalist, the health and medicine editor for Scientific American, and is a contributor to the publication's podcasts and Instant Egghead video series.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) is calling on Congress to pass a bill to help address and reduce the links between firefighting and cancer.

At the Mexico Volunteer Fire Department Tuesday, Hanna said it's increasingly difficult to find men and women who are willing to risk their lives by becoming firefighters. The danger, long hours and cost of training involved can be an impediment for many, but he said even worse than that is the threat of cancer.

Why some might keep their cancer a secret

Mar 19, 2016
Nesbitt_Photo/Flickr and Kaylyn Izzo

There are a number of diseases known to man that are incurable, some more serious than others. But if you had a serious incurable disease, would you want everyone around you to know? Or would you want to keep it to yourself?

These are questions many of us don’t have to think about, but for someone diagnosed with cancer, it may be something they put some serious thought into. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Mindy Greenstein discusses some of the problems cancer can cause “from both sides of the hospital bed.” Greenstein is a clinical psychologist and author, a consultant in the department of psychiatry at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and is a cancer survivor herself.

Cancer: To share or keep secret?

Mar 18, 2016

Some cancer patients choose to be open and public about their diagnosis and treatment. But others prefer to keep their struggle with the disease a secret from anyone but their closest family and friends. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Mindy Greenstein, a psycho-oncologist who is also a cancer survivor herself. They discuss the pros and cons of both decisions
 

This week: prostate cancer, rehabilitation and fracking

Jan 8, 2016

Men with prostate cancer are often advised to hold off on radical treatment to see whether they can maintain a normal life while a doctor monitors the disease.

Emergency physicians and nurse practitioners from Upstate University Hospital offer a new service that is centuries old: house calls.

Dr. Christian Knutsen created the service, called “Upstate at Home,” after recognizing how many people become ill or injured, don’t require a trip to the hospital and don’t want to leave their home.

Ovarian cancer causes & risk factors

Sep 11, 2015

September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. While it may not get much attention as breast cancer, ovarian cancer is the deadliest of the gynecological cancers. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with oncologist Dr. Martee Hensley of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about the risk factors for ovarian cancer and prevention measures. Dr. Hensley’s practice focuses on the care of women with gynecologic cancers.

Regular exercise in the teen years lays the foundation for a longer, healthier life, says a newly released long-term study.

Exercise physiologist Carol Sames, PhD, director of Upstate’s Vitality Fitness Program, helps explain the massive study of Chinese women on this week’s show. She cites its drawbacks and agrees with the idea that people should be encouraged to establish healthy exercise and other habits when young.

Also on the show: whether dyslexia creates a learning disability, and how a person's job could lead to cancer.

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