cholesterol

This week: nutrition, obesity and cholesterol

Feb 4, 2016

Ensuring proper nutrition for senior citizens involves looking at changes in both body and lifestyle, say two registered dietitian nutritionists at Upstate University Hopsital.

Decreases in muscle mass, bone density and sense of smell, coupled with physical illness or depression, contribute to diminished appetite and calories needed, say Carrie Carlton and Cecilia Sansone. Among their prescriptions are a varied diet of nutrient-rich foods tailored to the individual, sufficient fluids and several small meals as an alternative to three main meals.

New guidelines suggesting that all children be screened for high cholesterol, depression and HIV are based on research showing rising numbers of kids with those problems, explains Beth Nelsen, a pediatrician at Upstate Medical University.

Ages vary for the screenings -- from 9 to 11 for cholesterol and from 16 to 19 for HIV -- which are updated annually by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many tests, including for anemia and heart failure, have already been added by pediatricians during checkups, Nelsen says.

People with high cholesterol, who cannot tolerate statin drugs, may have a new option with a new class of drugs known as PCSK9 inhibitors.

Upstate cardiologist Robert Carhart says these new injectable drugs are biologics known as monoclonal antibodies -- which help clear artery-clogging LDL, or bad cholesterol. They accomplish this by inactivating proteins that otherwise would attach to receptors that are responsible for clearing the LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream.  

No yolks about it, eggs are healthy

May 31, 2015
UnknownNet Photography / Flickr

One day you hear they’re good for you and other days you hear they’re bad. The healthiness (or unhealthiness) of eggs have been debated for decades. Does the protein outweigh the cholesterol? What makes an egg good or bad and should we continue incorporating eggs into our diets?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Luc Djousse discusses the nutritional value of eggs. Djousse is director of research in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Eggs -- incredible again?

May 29, 2015
Marina Shemesh / Flickr

First medical experts told us not to eat too many eggs because they're high in cholesterol. But earlier this year, we were told that eating cholesterol is not what causes heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care", hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview Dr. Luc Djousse, director of research in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. They discuss the nutrients found in eggs and how dietary cholesterol really works.

Angioplasty: How balloons can save your life

Apr 13, 2014
Denise Chan / flickr

If bent the right way, a balloon can be used to make an animal. If pumped with hot air, a balloon can be used to fly. Balloons have many different functions, mostly in the realm of fun. But, balloons have also been used to save lives through a procedure known as angioplasty.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Amar Krishnaswamy discusses angioplasties. Dr. Krishnaswamy is an interventional cardiologist in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Krishnaswamy.

Cholesterol: The good, the bad, and the...wine?

Feb 16, 2014
wellcome images / flickr

Cholesterol. It’s something we need, but becomes a problem when there’s too much of it. It’s a buzzword often thrown around in advertisements for both food and medication, and something people watch out for in their diets. But what is cholesterol, and why can it be a problem?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson answers these questions and more. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

Cornell University

Researchers in upstate New York have created an app that will allow users to test their cholesterol levels through a blood sample that’s analyzed directly through their smartphone.