citizens united

Berkeley Political Scientist Wendy Brown offers an interesting spin on the Citizens United case—the problem is not that corporations are seen as people; it’s that people are only seen as political entrepreneurs, and not citizens. And that move reflects a bigger problem she has written a book about—the shift in much of our thinking toward a market mentality.  This week on the Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher has a substantive conversation about a supposedly encroaching neoliberalism with Brown, the author of Undoing the Demos.

One of the fallouts of the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision has been the emergence of several groups dedicated to amending the Constitution, in order to reverse the case and limit the role of money in politics.  A leader among them has been the group Move to Amend.  On this week’s edition of the Campbell Conversations, Grant Reeher talks with the group’s national spokesperson, David Cobb.  Cobb was also the Green Party’s presidential candidate in 2004.

Four years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that corporations could spend unlimited amounts of money on politics, a central New York group is calling on New York state to stand up to the ruling.

Members of Move to Amend are lobbying state officials to pass a resolution opposing the Citizens United case. Michael Messina-Yauchzy says a constitutional amendment is the ultimate solution.

"Corporations need to be limited," he said Tuesday. "It’s 'we the people,' the corporations need to be controlled by the people. We establish the legal framework."