Communication can frustrate a person with Alzheimer’s disease and his or her family and caregivers, but there are ways to help, says Katrina Skeval, chief program officer for the Alzheimer’s Association Central New York chapter.


Depending on which source you consider, the average American adult is subjected to somewhere between 2,000 and 20,000 messages each day. In our digitally enhanced, 24/7 world of instant communication, these images find their way to us through email, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, web browsing, online and traditional news consumption, television, and more. They come at us whether we want them or not.

No matter how you slice it, we are overrun with information.

Dr. Rick Kelley and Dr. Sam Woods' first trip to Ethiopia to provide medical care to people with ear, nose and throat ailments grew into a nonprofit organization with a broader goal of providing lasting help.

“What we figured out on that very first trip is that although it may feel good to go on a medical trip and go treat a couple hundred people, it’s really just a drop in the bucket,” Kelley says.