Concussions

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Just one minute into the first round of a sparring match at Aquinas Institute, and Michael Robertson has already thrown and ducked dozens of punches. The young boxer has been hit a number of times, too. In the second round, his opponent takes control at times, backing Robertson into a corner and landing continuous jabs. Coach Dominic Arioli stands inside the ring, pacing quickly.

This week: ADHD, winter concussions and dry skin

Dec 23, 2015

If your child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD,) it’s better to start medical treatment early, so the child keeps up with his or her peers, says Stephen Faraone, a distinguished professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

An expert in ADHD, Faraone explains its many facets, including its tendency to run in families, the reluctance of some people toward medication and the hopes for genetic research.

Also this week: winter head injuries, what to do about dry skin, and research into Christmas Tree Syndrome.

This week: concussion, corporal punishment and AIDS

Sep 11, 2015

 

Public awareness of concussion, especially in sports, has increased in recent years, mirrored by an explosion of concussion-related research, says Brian Rieger, PhD, director of the Upstate Concussion Center.

Upstate researchers are tracking how students with concussions struggle in the classroom and seeking better ways to diagnose concussions and manage the resulting stress, Rieger says. They are also participating in a study with a company that is developing a new generation of portable, hand-held devices for objectively assessing brain function.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) has joined the movement in Congress to make the NCAA more accountable. 

Katko is among five House of Representatives members introducing a bill that would reform the way the NCAA oversees college sports. The legislation would require the NCAA to be more transparent in how it deals with disciplinary cases, which include investigations that sometimes go on years. There would also be some sort of legal avenue for schools or athletes accused of transgressions.  

With the incidence of kidney stones on the rise, experts believe the obesity epidemic is at least partially to blame. But there are some preventative measures that could save you from some pain.

This week: winter head injuries, and positive parenting

Dec 31, 2014

Protecting yourself from head injury during the winter goes beyond wearing a helmet while skiing and skating, according to concussion expert Brian Rieger, PhD.

"Behavior is as important as safety equipment," Rieger says.

More about traumatic brain injury prevention and why helmets may not protect against concussion.

Also this week: the principles of discipline and new research on parenting. Plus, a place for hospitalized children to keep up with schoolwork, within Upstate Golisano Children's Hospital.

This week, HealthLink on Air is airing an entire episode devoted to nursing. We will hear about two types of specialized nursing care, plus we’ll hear from the author of the American Nurse Project.

Cazey Hammerle, a nurse at Upstate University Hospital, talks about the challenges of caring for patients who are overweight or obese. Many of these patients have diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, degenerative joint disease and/or high cholesterol -- which can complicate their medical care.

This week: the ebola outbreak and concussion awareness

Sep 11, 2014

Advances in technology and transportation have made it easier than ever to travel from continent to continent. For example, one can travel from Africa to Syracuse in about 30 hours by plane. This means that we are all vulnerable to the outbreak of the Ebola virus, says Dr. Timothy Endy, division chief of infectious disease at Upstate Medical University.

Ebola has spread in western Africa partly because of a lack of infrastructure, Endy explains.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO

Following the tragic deaths of several high school football players across the country, the sport's rules and practices are being scrutinized. Recent rule changes are protecting helmetless players, and some coaches in the region say it's bringing common sense back to the game.

On a chilly evening, the Oswego Buccaneers varsity football team hustles down the field against the Nottingham Bulldogs, its quarterback lobbing a well placed ball to an open receiver.

The changing culture of youth sports

Sep 20, 2013

With children starting to play sports at younger ages and playing their sports year-round, the chance they are going to get injured is on the rise. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with Dr. Pietro Tonino, the chief of sports medicine at Loyola University in Chicago, about why these injuries are occurring and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: How has youth sports changed over the years?

An upstate company has developed a system for motorcycle helmets that could have applications for both defensive driving and sports. A system of sensors alerts riders when the helmet has damage that might not be visible, but could compromise safety.

While a new law in New York State puts more stringent rules in place for how school districts must deal with concussions suffered by student athletes, club sports aren't covered by any such regulations.  As WRVO's Ellen Abbott reports in the third part of a series, at least one central New York recreational league is trying to do something about it.

Doctor Brian Reiger sees kids suffering from concussions every day. He’s Director of the Concussion and Sports Concussion Program at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. 

“A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that is caused by a blow or a jolt to the head,” said Dr. Reiger. “It disrupts the brains function.  In most cases, the brain looks normal and we see no evidence of injury but we know it’s been injured because it’s not working properly.”

Reiger says while there is no test that determine whether someone has a concussion, there are signs and symptoms.

Carolyn Tangoran of Fayetteville suffered her first concussion as a competitive cheerleader.  She was at the base of a cheerleading stunt during practice, when it fell on her. 

"I didn't really say anything, because I just, you know, it truly is a very competitive sport, and I didn't want to step out for any reason," said Tangoran.

She kept on practicing and competing with the team.