conservation

Unplug for Earth Day

Apr 22, 2015
Samuel M. Livingston / Flickr

Some SUNY ESF scientists say a booming world population and over-consumption, are the earth’s biggest enemy.  But they say there are things humans can do on a an individual level that can make a difference in the big picture.

With a world population expected to top eight billion in a decade, professor Chuck Kroll, of the department of environmental resources engineering, looks at all those humans and the resources they uses as the biggest environmental threats out there.

Lessons In The Lakes

May 13, 2014

In this archived broadcast from August 3, 1984, John Weeks talks about a ride his wife and him took on one of the lakes as an anniversary gift from his children. He talks about the boat tour that they went on and what the lake is like compared to different lakes. Weeks says that he wishes they heard more about the lake and what makes it what it is.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

SUNY ESF is working to bring back a tree that once made up one quarter of the standing timber in forests in the Eastern United States. Now, researchers have come up with a variety of the tree that resists the blight that killed billions of American chestnut trees.

Matt Richmond / WSKG

Solar and wind power have gotten a lot of the attention as promising alternative power sources. But energy extracted from plants, known as biofuels, is also the subject of ongoing research.

Carlet Cleare / WXXI

The new Finger Lakes Museum is kicking up its fundraising efforts to raise $1.3 million in private funds necessary to receive matching state funding for it's new facility.

John Weeks discusses influential figures from his past and shares some excerpts from a book written by one such man, Aldo Leopold. Weeks relays some strategies to "preserve the sanity of our wild world," including the need to know our world at least as well as the Native Americans.

More than 200 zoo keepers from around the country descended on the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse this week for the 39th annual conference of the Association of Zookeepers.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Tree lovers are uniting behind a plan by a biologist from Salisbury University in Maryland to preserve and encourage old growth Forests .  The goal, is to create a network of over two-thousand undisturbed, yet accessible, forests across the country.

John Weeks reminisces on his early life in the countryside of central New York. Since childhood, Weeks has studied nature. He recounts the plants and wildlife that left a lasting impression on him early in life.

Originally aired on July 22, 1988.

The Red Fox

Jul 9, 2012

John Weeks dispels the myths surrounding foxes. These small mammals are not nearly as sly or cruel as Aesop's Fables would lead you to believe. Weeks discusses the curiosity and beauty of foxes. Not only are these animals exciting to observe but they also fulfill a crucial role in their ecosystem.

Originally aired on July 8, 1988.

John Weeks reflects on how hayfields have changed since his youth on the family farm. While the technology of haying has evolved dramatically, hayfields still serve as a home for a wide variety of wildlife.

Originally aired on June 17, 1988.

Paco Lyptic via Flickr

Every spring, a state Department of Environmental Conservation biologist drives along north country highways at dawn or dusk, stopping every so often to pull over and listen to the nature sounds.

She's listening for the distinctive “peent” of the singing American woodcock, a brown speckled bird a little larger than a songbird with a long, narrow beak for pulling earthworms out of the newly thawed ground.