Constitution Pipeline

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Pipeline companies are not having a lot of success in New York so far in 2016; opponents say they are dirty and continue New York’s over reliance on fossil fuels. Two projects have already been canceled. But a pipeline company representative says the projects are not as harmful as opponents say, and essential for the state’s current electric needs.

Until recently, expanding and building pipelines was not terribly controversial, as most people agreed that there was a common need to transport oil and gas for fuel and electricity.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News File Photo

In the past week, two major natural gas pipelines have been scrapped in New York. A third, which would expand a line that is near the Indian Point Nuclear Power plant, is still scheduled, but opponents are putting pressure on Gov. Andrew Cuomo to use his persuasive powers with the federal government to stop the expansion.

Opponents of new pipelines carrying natural gas extracted from hydrofracking have had a good week.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Fracktivists, as anti-hydrofracking activists are called, hope to play a role in New York’s presidential primary. They are asking Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, as well as Republican candidates, to take a stand against the Constitution Pipeline and other natural gas pipelines, that if approved could criss-cross the state.

More than 200 fracktivists held a rally Tuesday to oppose natural gas pipelines in New York, and to call on Gov. Andrew Cuomo to ban them.

Constitution Pipeline pushes back its target date

Mar 10, 2016

The Constitution Pipeline Company has changed its planned completion date.

The second half 2017 is the new target for when the Constitution Pipeline will be in service. The previous in-service date was the fourth quarter of this year. 

In a statement on its website, the company says it needs more time to comply with the environmental conditions of federal regulators.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News File Photo

The energy company Kinder Morgan has formally applied to install a pipeline connecting Pennsylvania gas wells with Massachusetts.

Pipeline fight puts focus on one particular agency

Sep 28, 2015
Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

The Constitution Pipeline almost passed through Cindy Beach’s backyard. But the route changed. Now, the pipeline will be about two football fields away from Beach’s house in the village of Franklin in Delaware County. 

To get the change, she asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC, if it was possible to bypass her small property. But one neighbor wasn’t so lucky. Beach says the pipeline company is taking part of his property by eminent domain.

Constitution Pipeline

Recently, Pennsylvania residents had the opportunity to voice their concerns or support for the Constitution Pipeline project, which would enter New York through Broome County and connect to an existing upstate pipeline. It was the last public hearing before its final approval by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC.