Cornell University

Gabe Altieri / WSKG News

A proposal to reword a swimming ban at Ithaca natural areas to make it easier to understand is on hold. The city's Common Council wants to focus on education and outreach about the dangers of swimming in these areas instead.

But education isn't always easy.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

Binghamton resident Sara Hopkins wants her good, used clothes to have a second chance. But there are some she simply doesn't donate.

"I'm honestly not sure the best way to get rid of ratty old clothes, [like] old gym clothes with holes in them," she said in her home on the city's east side. 

"I don't know how to recycle those, so they usually end up going in the garbage."

It turns out a lot of ratty old clothes -- and plenty of not-so-ratty ones -- don’t end up at Goodwill or the Salvation Army. They find their way into the trash.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Planting season is getting underway in central New York. And for farmers it means another year when the changing climate can make or break a growing season. But farmers aren’t sitting still when it comes to dealing with the more severe weather that comes along with a warming climate.

Cornell president dies

Mar 7, 2016
USCPublicDiplomacy / Flickr

Cornell University Elizabeth Garrett died of colon cancer last night, according to Board of Trustees Chairman Robert Harrison. 

Roxanne Mourhess says the milk trucks roll by her antique store every day. The store is a 150-year-old former church on the main drag in Campbell, New York, a small town near Corning. The store is just down the street from the weathered, light blue grocery store. In the other direction, a Kraft plant puffs out steam by the railroad tracks. Mourhess couldn’t believe it when she heard that the plant was slated for closure. 

“Your immediate reaction is, ‘Oh my gosh, another manufacturing industry in our town, and thus our country, is not going to be here,’” she says.

Many political observers have expressed deep concerns about how America’s response to the threat of terror has affected our democracy, and the rights that secure it.  This week on the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher talks with Cornell professor Sidney Tarrow, who has written a new book that takes an expansive, historical look at how war, state authority, and democracy interact.  They explore the effects of the creation of a new American “security state” post 9-11, what lessons we might draw from other nations’ past experiences, and what’s different about our current situation. 

Matt Richmond / WSKG News File Photo

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, will certainly affect dairy farmers in New York state. But will it affect consumers? Of the 11 other Pacific Rim nations in the agreement, Canada, New Zealand and Australia have robust dairy industries that want to export more products to the U.S.

Solvejg Wastvedt / WSKG News

The education programs that serve New York’s prison population are streamlining the path to a college degree. Private organizations offer college classes in 19 state facilities. Now several of the groups have formed a consortium to help students make it to graduation day.

In the past, transfer to a new prison often meant the end of an education for people working on their degrees. Many facilities don’t offer college programs. And even if they do, there are uncertainties: Will credits transfer? Are spots in the program open?

via Wikimedia Commons

Today is Cornell University’s 150th anniversary. Its charter was signed in Albany in 1865. One of the school’s founders, Ezra Cornell, was a farmer and made veterinary science a priority. This is the story of the career of the first doctor of veterinary medicine to graduate from Cornell.

Credit njxw / Flickr

 

Many working parents may find it hard to imagine a daycare center right in the same building as their job. But Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) wants to change that. She has introduced a bill to increase tax breaks for businesses that build onsite child care.

Having child care at work could make a big difference for parents like Stephanie Walsh. Walsh says sometimes she barely leaves the house in over a week. She used to go to work every morning, as an accountant at a Southern Tier construction company. But then she had her son Jacob.

Matt Richmond / WSKG News

A Tompkins County-based group of investors is nearing completion of an unlikely project -- an industrial-scale wind farm. It would be made up of seven turbines and produce up to 12 megawatts of electricity, enough to power a few thousand homes.

Marguerite Wells is the project manager of Black Oak Wind Farm, which at this point is just a field with a wind measuring tower outside of Ithaca. But, according to Wells, the hard part of getting a wind farm built there is already behind them.

David Chanatry/New York State Reporting Project

A thiamine deficiency might be to blame for a recent die-off of steelhead trout in the Salmon River.

The Department of Environmental Conservation says it began receiving reports about steelhead trout swimming erratically and dying in the Salmon River and other rivers off Lake Ontario last month. Three fish were sent to Cornell's Aquatic Animal Health Lab, where research scientist Rod Getchell examined the fish for diseases.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

It’s a rainy late fall day in New York City and the Metropolitan Museum of Art is crowded. Even Walter Liedtke, one of the museum’s curators, has to vie for viewing space. As he tells the story of a once debated Rembrandt painting, he has to shuffle to the side to make room for some patrons.

"I can’t really see it on the surface, but in X-rays there’s been a lot of discussion as to whether this picture was longer on the bottom," he described, before being interrupted.

Studying the weaves of the canvas is done by shooting x-rays through the layers of paint and exposing what’s behind the image most only glance at on the wall.

fishhawk / Flickr

New York’s dairy industry likely won’t see more of the good times next year farmers experienced in 2014, largely because dairy prices and profits are expected to level off.

Andy Novakovic, a professor of agriculture economics at Cornell University, says dairy markets in New York are already starting to decline to be in balance with the rest of the world, "but we have quite a bit of altitude to lose before we get to where the rest of the world is," he said. 

This was a great year for the dairy industry, he said. 

 

In a decision released last week, the highest court in New York ruled that local governments can ban drilling within their borders. And while hydrofracking remains on hold in the state, the ruling is expected to have a huge impact on the industry in New York if fracking is eventually permitted.

 

The dean of the law school at Cornell University, Eduardo Penalver, helps explain the court's ruling

upholding local bans on gas drilling in New York.

 

Playing youth sports a sign of career success?

Jun 20, 2014
Joseph Gilbert / via Flickr

Earning a varsity letter in high school for playing sports will mean better jobs and increased philanthropy later in life. That's the consensus of new research from Cornell University.

Two coinciding studies looked at the success of people who played a sport in school. The first asked potential employers and co-workers to look at extra-curricular activities of potential hires.

http://www.chess.cornell.edu/

Cornell University’s state-of-the-art particle accelerator won’t face a loss of funding for the next few years at least. The National Science Foundation will spend $100 million to keep the synchrotron running.

Cornell’s High Energy Synchrotron Light Source, or CHESS, is one of only two of its kind in the United States. CHESS uses high intensity x-ray and radiation to test hypotheses in physics, biology, and chemistry.

The lab will now receive $100 million over the next five years.

NathanaelB / Via Flickr

Upstate New York’s cities need to make investments in quality of life if they want to recreate their past economic vitality, according to a local expert on cities.

Mildred Warner of Cornell University recently held a conference at the college on the economic state of upstate New York’s largest urban centers.

She says the region’s cities aren’t getting the "full gamut" of rediscovery by younger generations because they’re not investing enough in areas like quality of life and infrastructure.

New York State Department of Transportation

A clear and present danger hiding in plain sight.

That’s how Cornell University’s Susan Christopherson describes the oil train traffic through the state.

A massive explosion caused by a runaway oil train in Quebec last July has raised awareness about the levels of flammable material being shipped by rail.

Christopherson, a professor of city and regional planning, says New York state finds itself with a mobile oil problem.

Cornell University

Researchers in upstate New York have created an app that will allow users to test their cholesterol levels through a blood sample that’s analyzed directly through their smartphone.  

Matt Martin / WSKG

Every year Christmas tree farmers lose a portion of their crop to a fungus that attacks the root of the tree.  One tree farm in the Southern Tier has started planting a species that seems to be more resistant to the disease.

Kate O'Connell/Innovation Trail

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration is continuing its program for promoting upstate produce with new legislation that aims to support the marketing of New York wines. The new laws permit wine to be sold at roadside farm stands and expand wine trail designations along state roadways.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

A new exhibit at the New York State Fair in Syracuse this year shows cows giving birth; and you just never know when you might be able to see a maternal miracle.

When the ribbon on the new Dairy Cow Birthing Center was cut, visitors were milling about, enjoying some dairy related snacks. Reporters were interviewing the experts who would explain why fairgoers should want to see the birth of a calf, when there was an interruption.

"We have a calf coming. Didn't mean to interrupt, but nature calls."

Kevin Maloney

After more than a decade of development, Cornell University has introduced two new apple varieties to upstate New York.

Previously known as New York one and two, the new RubyFrost and SnapDragon varieties were named Thursday and will be available to consumers as early as this fall.

Lessons for living

Jun 23, 2013
Enidanc / Flickr

In the age of the Internet, when was the last time you sought out an elder for advice? In a recent survey in the United Kingdom, nine out of 10 elders said they were being overlooked for advice from their grandchildren.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Karl Pillemer, a professor of human development at the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University and a professor of gerontology at the Weill Cornell Medical College. In 2004, he founded The Legacy Project for which he collected practical advice for living from over 1,000 senior citizens across the nation. The project led to his book “30 Lessons for Living: Tried and True Advice from the Wisest Americans.”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Karl Pillemer.

Upstate New York's plethora of colleges and universities means that this month, thousands of students are graduating, reflecting on their time in college in the region and then moving on to the next phase of their lives. One outstanding graduating senior, Cornell University's Kyle Dake, who was just named Sports Illustrated's male College Athlete of the Year.

 

Invasion: Landscapes in Crisis describes the effects of deer-browsing, buck rubbing and other environmental threats to plants and trees in and around Cornell Plantations Botanical Gardens and Arboretum at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY.

WBFO file photo

A recent study outlines a scenario that would see New York state’s energy infrastructure based on close to 100 percent renewable sources by the year 2030.

New food processing facilities are popping up across western New York, and they're generating demand for skilled workers to operate them.

Matt Richmond/Innovation Trail

Tyler Hale is a 25-year-old volunteer firefighter with the Cayuga Heights Fire Department. Wires connecting small plastic sensors snake up his arms and legs and down his back and Huiju Park, an assistant professor at Cornell University, directs Hale through a series of movements.

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