data

Luke H. Gordon / Flickr

Syracuse City Hall is fine tuning an open data policy, after a two-week public comment period.

The policy is expected to launch later this month, and offers residents an easy way to access to public information involving the work of city government. Mayor Stephanie Miner says so far, the city has gotten good feedback about the proposed policy.

business.syrgov.net

The city of Syracuse has developed a business web portal that allows users to access information to start or grow their businesses. The database application is meant to spur economic development in small businesses.

NY educators try to turn data into student success

Jan 23, 2017
Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

New York's colleges are concerned about retaining students. 

Only about a quarter of New York's community college students get an associates degree in three years. That statistic doesn't include part-timers, students who transfer, or students who take a break between semesters. But still, it's a problem.

Educators are using data and analytics to figure out what to do, but it can be a struggle to turn data into action.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Syracuse Fire Department will begin using data to try to prevent fire fatalities.

The fire department will work with Sam Edelstein, the city’s chief data officer, to figure out an algorithm to determine what houses might not have working smoke detectors, which can save lives and prevent injuries. Edelstein says it starts with statistics showing the most likely victims of a house fire.

"Generally populations that have old or young residents in the houses are more likely to die in a fire because they need more time to get out of the house,” Edelstein said.

The city of Syracuse is expanding its strategy using open source data and technology to solve municipal problems.

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner admits in the beginning she was a skeptic about using data and technology to try to fix nagging issues. But she’s sold on the concept now, after the city’s Innovation Team engaged in a number of initiatives.

 

A major breach in data at Anthem Inc — a health care company — is raising questions about the security of data across the industry. A Rochester cyber security specialist weighed-in on the implications of this latest incident which has compromise the personal data of 80 million people.

Initial reports from Anthem say the breach didn’t put medical records of current members and former members at risk, but other identifying data (such as names, birthdays, and social security numbers) were exposed.