dementia

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The year 2016 was full of developments in the world of health -- including some health studies that contradicted each other. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Scott Hensley, the host of NPR's health blog “Shots,” about some of the most important health stories of the year, and how to sort through conflicting medical news.

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We can all be a bit forgetful sometimes, but when it becomes a life concerning issue, like dementia, there isn’t much that can be done in terms of treatment. However, new research suggests there may be action that can be taken in terms of prevention.

This week on “Take Care,” science and medical journalist Dan Hurley tells us how brain training games may lead to a significant reduction in risk for dementia. Hurley wrote the article, “Could Brain Training Prevent Dementia?” for the New Yorker on the study, and is the author of the book, “Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power.”

Can you train your brain to prevent dementia?

Oct 7, 2016

The debate over whether brain training games can help prevent dementia has gone back and forth over the last few years. This week, a review of the evidence concluded that the answer was no. But a study announced at the Alzheimer's Association meeting in July showed the games hold promise. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with medical journalist Dan Hurley, who wrote about the study for the New Yorker.

Mild cognitive impairment is when some brain processes are not functioning the way they should at one’s age. This state, short of full-on dementia and not serious enough to interfere with daily life, might involve problems with memory, language use, reasoning, or visual and spatial abilities, says Upstate University Hospital neurologist Amy Sanders, who runs a clinic that tests for the condition at the hospital.

Sanders touches on screening methods, the role of memory, the relationship to dementia and tips to keep the aging brain healthy on this week’s show.

This week: metabolic surgery, dementia care and more

Jun 16, 2016

The idea that a morbidly obese person can achieve a healthy weight through willpower alone is outdated, according to Dr. Howard Simon, director of bariatric surgery at Upstate University Hospital.

People with morbid obesity (defined as a body mass index above 40) have a metabolic disease too complicated to treat with just drugs, diet or exercise; and most will regain weight lost through those methods, he says. Simon explains why bariatric surgery, combined with behavioral changes, has a high rate of long-term success.

Some forgetfulness is part of normal aging, but memory loss severe enough to interfere with your daily life could be a sign of Alzheimer’s disease -- the most common form of dementia.

Cathy James is the chief executive officer of the Alzheimer's Association of Central New York. She describes what this incurable disease does to patients and their families, gives an update on research and offers some healthy living tips that might lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

Eileen Krupka's father has suffered from Alzheimer's Disease for the last six years.  He's like many other's with the progressive neurological disease of the brain he wanders, in fact 60-percent of Alzheimers or dementia patients wander and its a worry for the Krupka family, who live in Baldwinsville.

We have a lot of water around us. and he seems to be fascinated by the water and that's a huge concern