Democratic National Convention

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo got his moment on the convention stage Thursday night before Hillary Clinton’s speech.

Cuomo delivered his speech before the prime time program began, around 7:30 p.m., and he started the speech by mentioning his father, and Mario Cuomo’s famous 1984 Tale of Two Cities speech at the San Francisco convention 32 years ago.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said it’s a “sign of respect” for New York state that he’s been asked to speak on the final evening of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

He said he plans to mention his father, Mario Cuomo, the former governor who gave the memorable “Tale of Two Cities” speech at the 1984 Democratic convention. Andrew Cuomo said it’s the first national convention that he’s attended without his father, who died on New Year’s Day 2015.

Cuomo said he plans to touch on the larger theme of the two conventions: fear versus hope.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

 

Foreign trade deals are a contentious issue at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY), weighed in Wednesday, saying he’s against the Trans-Pacific Partnership proposal, known as the TPP.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo had a full schedule Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention, aimed at showcasing some of his strengths, including supporting LGBT rights and helping the homeless.

But first, he shared the stage with Hillary Clinton’s primary opponent, Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Cuomo began with a planned speech to the New York delegates attending the convention in Philadelphia, but he had to abbreviate it to leave time for the surprise guest to address the delegation of Clinton’s home state.

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

Democrats have become accustomed to having the best speech at their quadrennial convention given by someone named Obama. This year, that person might also be named Michelle.

Hers was not the keynote, nor the most anticipated, nor the longest speech of the night. But it mesmerized and subdued the raucous and rebellious crowd, focusing the enormous energy of Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Arena just where convention organizers had hoped — on Hillary Clinton.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

It’s supposed to be Hillary Clinton’s convention, but the focus Monday was on her primary challenger, Bernie Sanders, and his delegates, who continue to stew over a WikiLeaks release of Democratic National Committee emails that showed favoritism to Clinton over Sanders.

In New York’s delegation, annoyed Sanders supporters attending the convention in Philadelphia struggled to even secure a room to meet in so they could discuss all that’s happened.

For Michelle Obama, this election is about the kids. On the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, the first lady wove her vision for the next generation with her hope for the next president.

"This election, and every election, is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives," she said, adding that Hillary Clinton is the only candidate "who I trust with that responsibility."

Thank you so much. You know, it's hard to believe that it has been eight years since I first came to this convention to talk with you about why I thought my husband should be President. Remember how I told you about his character and conviction, his decency and his grace — the traits that we've seen every day that he's served our country in the White House.

Karen DeWitt

New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli and Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner join capitol correspondent Karen DeWitt and Casey Seiler of the Albany Times Union on today's "ConventionCast" to share their thoughts on the Democratic National Convention, the DNC email controversy, and Gov. Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill deBlasio's relationship.

Find more from New York Now.

Hillary Clinton will break the penultimate glass ceiling this week — becoming the first female nominee of a major American political party.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

The resignation of Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz over the release of emails showing that staff favored Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders overshadowed other news at the beginning of the Democratic National Convention. 

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

Eric Kingson, a Syracuse University professor who lost the Democratic primary for central New York's 24th Congressional District, is attending the Democratic National Convention (DNC) this week. Sen. Bernie Sanders, a former Democratic presidential candidate, had endorsed Kingson in his primary, but Colleen Deacon ultimately captured the party's ticket.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

New York state will have a big presence at this week’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Among the politicians who will speak from the podium, the state’s two senators.

Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

Supporters of the two outsider candidates in the presidential race are finding obstacles to attending the national conventions in Philadelphia and Cleveland, held during the next couple of weeks.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The way presidents are picked is changing according to central New York Bernie Sanders supporters. And, they say that plays right into the Vermont Democrat’s campaign.
 

The Syracuse millenials who support Sanders say they aren’t relying on political commercials and biographies from the candidates to make their political decisions.

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer will be one of the featured speakers Wednesday night at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.  The senior senator from New York says the 2012 election offers voters a clear choice.

New York state Democrats are well-represented at the Democratic National Convention which began in Charlotte, North Carolina Tuesday. But not all Democrats from the region are attending.

Governor Andrew Cuomo is one of many New York politicians who have chosen to scale back their participation in the national Democratic convention in North Carolina. While the others are Democrats seeking re-election in Congress, Cuomo is eschewing what could have been a prime time speaking slot.