A variety of new reconstructive and minimally invasive treatments are being used to correct problems with the urinary tract in men, women and children.

Upstate University Hospital Urologist Dmitriy Nikolavsky describes how he created a surgical procedure to restore a damaged urethra -- the tube through which urine leaves the body -- using a patient’s own tissue and avoiding the need for a tube implant.

Mild cognitive impairment is when some brain processes are not functioning the way they should at one’s age. This state, short of full-on dementia and not serious enough to interfere with daily life, might involve problems with memory, language use, reasoning, or visual and spatial abilities, says Upstate University Hospital neurologist Amy Sanders, who runs a clinic that tests for the condition at the hospital.

Sanders touches on screening methods, the role of memory, the relationship to dementia and tips to keep the aging brain healthy on this week’s show.


2015 was a banner year for kidney transplants at Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse. Surgeons performed 80 transplants, the most ever.

For the last 25 years, doctors at Upstate averaged about 30-40 kidney transplants a year, according to transplant chief Rainer Gruessner.

“The institution made a commitment to transplantation," Gruessner said. "More people came on board in terms of faculty and staff. New York State is underserved in terms of transplant facilities. And, that all contributed to the fact that last year the most kidney transplants were done at upstate.”

Nurses today are likely to have more training and to seek further training than their counterparts a generation ago, according to Upstate University Hospital’s Chief Nursing Officer Nancy Page and Clinical Coordinator for Palliative Care Archie McEvers, a nurse practitioner.

Emergency physicians and nurse practitioners from Upstate University Hospital offer a new service that is centuries old: house calls.

Dr. Christian Knutsen created the service, called “Upstate at Home,” after recognizing how many people become ill or injured, don’t require a trip to the hospital and don’t want to leave their home.

Diabetes: Symptoms, signs and causes

Jun 14, 2015
Neeta Lind / Flickr

Diabetes has reached epidemic levels, and in fact is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, but many people don't know exactly what it is, beyond the fact that is has something to do with sugar levels.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Nathan discusses diabetes, how it’s caused and what symptoms to check for if you’ve developed it. Nathan is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the General Clinical Research Center and of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.  

This week: reducing complications in diabetes

May 30, 2014

The sharp reduction in diabetic complications is encouraging news for more than 21 million Americans who have been diagnosed with the disease. Federal researchers recently showed about 2/3 fewer heart attacks, 50 percent fewer strokes and amputations, and 30 percent fewer incidents of kidney failure among people with diabetes over the past two decades.

Answer to preventing illness may be in Vitamin D

May 18, 2014

Vitamin D is the vitamin most often associated with sunshine, but could it also be used to prevent cancer and heart disease?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University and chief of preventative medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, discusses how clinical trials could prove that Vitamin D could help prevent diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and cancer.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joann Manson.

For people with diabetes, monitoring foot health is as important as tracking sugar levels, blood pressure and kidney function.

"If they don't have good blood supply to their foot, you can give all of the antibiotics that you want, but the antibiotics go in the blood, and the blood can't get to the foot," says Dr. Palma Shaw, a vascular surgeon at Upstate.

We'll hear how diabetes can lead to amputation and why regular podiatry appointments are suggested.