diet

Maintaining a healthy weight through the holidays

Dec 7, 2014
thepeachmartini / Flickr

It happens every year. The holiday season rolls around and suddenly you can’t eat enough. Some people argue that holiday food is the best food of the year, but what can we do to make sure we don’t end up ruining a year’s worth of diet and exercise?

This week on “Take Care,” registered dietician Ashley Koff suggests strategies to eat healthy and not gain too much weight during the holiday time. Koff is a contributing editor to Prevention magazine, the author of two books and on the faculty of the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City.

Challenging America's food culture

Nov 23, 2014
Jon Mould / Flickr

When you were a child, you may have been told by your parents to finish everything on your plate.  You may also have been forced to eat vegetables as punishment or you were given candy as a reward for good behavior.  While such approaches to eating can be helpful in some circumstances, they are usually unhealthy and can contribute to obesity. 

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Cynthia Morrow talks about the unhealthy eating habits that are ingrained in American culture.  Morrow is a public health physician and teaches public health and preventive medicine at Upstate Medical University.

The many shapes and sizes of mushrooms

Oct 12, 2014
Seth Anderson / via Flickr

Although mushrooms are a popular ingredient in many dishes, their nutritional benefits are often overlooked. 

This week on “Take Care,” nutritionist Joan Rogus describes some of the more popular kinds of mushrooms and how to get the most nutrition out of them. Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Keeping the pounds off with sleep

Sep 19, 2014

A growing body of research is linking obesity to sleep deprivation. This week on “Take Care,” WRVO's weekly health and wellness show, hosts Linda Lowen and Lorraine Rapp speak with Dr. Eve Van Cauter, a physician and the director of the University of Chicago's Sleep, Metabolism and Health center, about why people feel hungry when they are tired and haven't had enough sleep.

Lorraine Rapp: Why is there a tendency to overeat when we’re tired?

Raw food diet in its 'natural state'

Sep 14, 2014
Steven Lilley / Flickr

The raw diet has received a lot of attention from celebrities and health conscious people recently. But what actually constitutes a “raw” diet? Is it the temperature? It may just be a few simple changes that will not alter your lifestyle, just your health.

This week on "Take Care," Yuri Elkaim talks about what it really means to be on a raw diet. Elkaim is a registered holistic nutritionist, fitness expert and health coach, as well as a former professional soccer player. He currently writes a fitness blog at U.S. News and World Report.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Yuri Elkaim.

Figuring out fiber

Aug 3, 2014
lisaclarke / Flickr

Fiber is a word that is often thrown around in conversations regarding digestive health.  Fiber comes in many forms, and it can be difficult knowing which types are the best for you.

This week on “Take Care,” nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about the importance of fiber in your diet and how to get the appropriate amount.  Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Becoming a quality 'qualitarian'

Jul 27, 2014
I-5 Design and Manufacture / Flickr

Using a list for grocery shopping can be helpful for remembering which food items to purchase, but is your list optimized for your health? 

This week on “Take Care,” Ashley Koff talks about the importance of selecting and incorporating quality foods into your diet.  Koff is a registered dietician and creator of the website ashleykoffapproved.com, which provides viewers with a comprehensive and thorough guide to quality eating.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Ashley Koff.

The Grain Brain diet: adopting a demanding nutrition plan

Jun 29, 2014
Lori Branham / Flickr

It’s breakfast time, and you’re about to dig into a plate of—salmon?

This week on “Take Care,” we present the second installment of our interview with Dr. David Perlmutter, who explains how to transition into his low-carb diet.  Perlmutter is a board-certified neurologist and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition.  He is also the author of Grain Brain: The surprising truth about wheat, carbs, and sugar—your brain’s silent killers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Perlmutter.

Charles Knowles / Flickr

You may be careful to eat whole grain breads and cereals instead of white bread, but did you know that some experts say even those foods could be hurting your health?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Perlmutter discusses the negative health effects of carbohydrates and how to reduce those effects.  Perlmutter is a board-certified neurologist and Fellow of the American College of Nutrition.  He is also the author of Grain Brain: The surprising truth about wheat, carbs, and sugar—your brain’s silent killers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. David Perlmutter.

Why carbohydrates may be bad for brain health

Jun 20, 2014
surlygirl / Flickr

In recent years, many people have adopted a low-carbohydrate diet to help with weight loss or because they want to eat less gluten. But some new research shows there may be a connection between carbs and cognitive function. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. David Perlmutter, a board-certified neurologist and author of "Grain Brain: The surprising truth about wheat, carbs, and sugar -- your brain’s silent killers."  Dr. Perlmutter talks about his book and the potential health benefits of a low-carbohydrate diet.

Strokes that occur in women create symptoms that are different than those in men. Women may experience the classic sudden numbness or severe headache, but they may also develop arm pain, general weakness or hiccups.

Rochele Clark, Upstate Medical University's stroke program coordinator, explains the importance of calling 911 immediately. Quick action is essential to help lessen the damage from a stroke.

7 foods that can take your diet to a "super" level

Mar 16, 2014
gkdavie / flickr

The word “superfood” may sound a bit intimidating, but nutritionists believe they allow people to take their healthy diets to the next level. But what makes a food “super,” and what foods actually make the cut?

This week on Take Care, Rachel Berman talks about seven superfoods that can easily be incorporated into a healthy diet. Berman is a registered dietician and the health editor at About.com. She is also the author of Boosting Your Metabolism for Dummies and Mediterranean Diet for Dummies.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Rachel Berman.

Cholesterol: The good, the bad, and the...wine?

Feb 16, 2014
wellcome images / flickr

Cholesterol. It’s something we need, but becomes a problem when there’s too much of it. It’s a buzzword often thrown around in advertisements for both food and medication, and something people watch out for in their diets. But what is cholesterol, and why can it be a problem?

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robert S. Rosenson answers these questions and more. Dr. Rosenson is a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and is also director of cardio-metabolic disorders at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Rosenson.

Go nuts the next time you snack

Jan 12, 2014
Leah Landry / WRVO

Want to get your weight down and your health up? Maybe you've made a New Years resolution that says you're sticking to heart healthy foods and a guilt-free diet plan. Turns out the answer is nuts.

A recent study, in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that people who regularly eat nuts are 20 percent less likely to die from heart disease, respiratory disease or cancer. Registered dietitian Rachel Berman joined us to discuss the findings and to take a good look at the heart-healthy nut.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Rachel Berman.

More salt, more problems, says expert

Oct 27, 2013
Judy van der Velden / Flickr

If your mouth begins to water when you think about pretzels, peanuts and French fries, then you probably like salty foods. If this is true, then you are one of the many who love salt. But while some people understand that too much salt intake isn’t healthy, most don’t realize that cutting back on salt means more than just avoiding the salt shaker during meal time.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Norman Kaplan discusses salt’s effect on the body, and why people should be much more aware of how much salt they are actually taking in. Dr. Kaplan is a professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where he’s been on the faculty for over four decades. His book, Kaplan’s Clinical Hypertension, is currently in its 10th edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Kaplan.

pboyd04 / Flickr

Many health professionals recommend eating less salt. But why is too much salt bad for your health? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Norman Kaplan of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, whose textbook on high blood pressure, "Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension," is in its 10th edition.

Lorraine Rapp: So when it enters our system, what actually takes place in the body that causes it to have harmful effects on our blood pressure?

dreyboblue / Flickr

Halloween wouldn’t be the same without horror films, costumes, and of course, candy. The more candy, the more successful the trick-or-treating. But when children start sorting through their sugary treasures, it may not be a bad idea to have a toothbrush on standby to help combat the real horror of Halloween — cavities.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Thomas Salinas talks about why sugar, something most people -- particularly kids -- love, can cause cavities and dental decay. Dr. Salinas is a professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic, a world renown medical practice and research group in Rochester, Minnesota.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Salinas.

Why exactly is sugar bad for your teeth?

Oct 18, 2013
Steven Guzzardi / Flickr

October 31 is right around the corner, and with Halloween comes candy. We've all been told, with too much candy comes cavities. But why does sugar cause tooth decay? Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Thomas Salinas, professor of dentistry at the Mayo Clinic about how cavities occur and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: What is it about sugar that causes cavities?

You can't go wrong with fall veggies

Oct 13, 2013
Leah Landry / WRVO

What do you think of when you hear the words "fall foods?" For children, “fall foods” may mean candy corn and Halloween treats, while others may think vegetables -- things like squash, cabbage and beets. These fall under the category of autumnal vegetables, and can provide many healthy benefits to consumers of them.

This week on Take Care, nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about what makes fall vegetables good for you. Rogus is a registered dietitian in central New York who's been a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for over 25 years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Copper is an important aspect of proper nutrition, and vital for us to maintain a healthy body. But a group of upstate New York researchers have concluded too much copper in our diet could be a contributing factor in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Tap water coming through copper pipes, fruits, vegetables, red meat and nuts; these are all sources of copper that we consume on a daily basis.

Does an apple a day really keep the doctor away?

Sep 8, 2013
Kevin Maloney

We’ve all been told that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. In the over 150 years that saying has been around, many have taken it as common health knowledge. But are apples really that good for you?

According to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician from central New York, the reason the saying has stood the test of time is because of the truth behind it. When asked what health benefits an apple can provide, Joan believes an easier question to answer would be, “What doesn’t an apple do for us?”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

Jeremy Wilburn / Creative Commons License

It used to be the "Freshman 5." Now it’s the "Freshman 15." But students who started college this fall now have new digital tools available to help them stay healthy.

On-demand digital health information being provided by colleges seems to be helping control those extra pounds undergraduates can put on.

Dietician Colleen Dour evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based wellness program in a study for Syracuse University. The program focuses on wellness and body image, rather than dieting.

Advancements in AIDS treatment means that people with the illness are living longer than ever. That means they need to take better care of their long-term health. A new program for AIDS patients in the north country focuses on improving their nutrition.