dietary supplements

Getting your calcium – dairy vs. dietary supplements

Feb 4, 2017
Guy Montag/Flickr

Calcium is essential for healthy bones, but could getting it from supplements be doing more harm than good?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Taylor Wallace, affiliate professor in the department of Nutrition and Food Studies at George Mason University and former senior director of science, policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation, discusses the effects that taking calcium supplements could have on cardiovascular health.

Calcium supplement controversy

Feb 3, 2017
Catherine Loper / WRVO News

Many people try to increase their consumption of calcium to help prevent osteoperosis. But there has been some research that indicates that calcium supplements could increase the risk of heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Taylor Wallace, a professor in nutrition and food studies at George Mason University, about the controversy over calcium supplements. Wallace is also the former senior director of science policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Ano Lobb / Flickr

More and more Americans are seeking non-traditional therapies to find relief from symptoms and pain and to maintain overall health. But if you're a medical consumer interested in complementary or integrative treatments, how do you know what's safe and what's effective? One reliable source is the National Institutes of Health.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Josephine Briggs, director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at NIH gives an overview of these kinds of therapies – and what to look out for. A Harvard- and Yale-trained physician, Briggs is recognized internationally for her research accomplishments. The center she heads investigates and researches these therapies and informs the general public of their findings.

Keeping cool: how to treat hot flashes

Sep 14, 2014
Jason Coleman

Hot flashes are a normal part of any woman’s progression through menopause that are often viewed as a simple passing phase. While many women go through menopause with little discomfort, others have a much harder time dealing with their symptoms and look for available treatment options.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. JoAnn Manson discusses hot flashes and the things that women can do to reduce the severity of their symptoms. Manson is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women’s hospital.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Manson.

Karen DeWitt/WRVO

A push to ban the fitness supplement DMAA brought a sports hero and parents who say they lost their son to the substance to the state Capitol.