disaster preparedness

Advice to help you prepare for disaster

Nov 16, 2014
dalexfilms / via Flickr

There is a lot more that goes into preparing for any disaster than one might think. The usual flashlight and batteries just won’t cut it.

This week on “Take Care,” Commissioner Jerome Hauer shares advice on how to prepare for a disaster. Hauer is head of the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services.

How to prepare for a natural disaster

Nov 14, 2014
Canadian Pacific / via Flickr

Living in upstate New York brings with it a variety of weather -- and natural disasters, like blizzards, hurricanes, tornadoes or flooding. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen have part two of their conversation with Commisioner Jerome Hauer of the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, who outlines what residents can do to prepare themselves for a weather emergency.

How New York state prepares for the worst

Nov 9, 2014
www.cwcs.co.uk / Flickr

When disaster strikes, it generally is a surprise. But whether it's a natural disaster or a human-caused one, government entities can prepare for how to deal with them when they arise.

This week on “Take Care,” Commissioner Jerome Hauer of the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services discusses what New York state has done to prepare for emergencies. 

Preparing for disaster

Nov 7, 2014
Gino Geruntino / WRVO

First September 11, then hurricanes, flooding and superstorms -- New York state has had to deal with its fair share of disasters, both natural and manmade. But what has the state learned from these events to help us deal with future catastrophes? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Commissioner Jerome Hauer of the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services about what has been done to prepare for the next big crisis.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO/File photo

Onondaga County and emergency management officials are taking the next step to help central New Yorkers prepare for a natural or man-made disaster. Officials believe it’s not a matter of if a disaster will strike, but when, and residents need to be ready.

Following a survey last year of central New Yorkers asking how ready they were for a disaster, one statistic stood out to Rosie Taravella of the Red Cross. Most people believe emergency responders will be able to help them right away if there is a community-wide storm, flood or man-made disaster.

Gino Geruntino / WRVO

Members from about 20 different federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and Canada were on Lake Ontario today to take part in a full-scale security and preparedness exercise.

Dale Currier, director of the Oswego County Emergency Management Office, says today's exercise dealt with the loss of a commercial radiation source being brought in from Canada, and could have been used in a dirty bomb if it fell into the wrong hands.
 

Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services

The National Weather Service predicts 2014 will be a relatively tame hurricane season. But memories of hurricanes like Sandy and Irene, as well as tropical storm Lee, have led Gov. Andrew Cuomo to create the Citizen Preparedness Corps in hopes of training New Yorkers to be their own first responders.

New York State Department of Homeland Security Commissioner Jerome Hauer didn't mince words when he spoke about the Citizen Preparedness Corps training classes.

“Getting the population to deal with a disaster on their own is absolutely critical,” Hauer said.

Carlet Cleare/WXXI

In his annual State of the State address Wednesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo outlined a major initiative to ramp up New York’s capacity for dealing with natural disasters.

Part of the multi-million dollar proposal involves installing a state-of-the-art weather detection system to provide more accurate, real time warnings.

The impact and severity of weather events like the tornado that hit Oklahoma City are increasing due to a changing global climate, according to research from the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Onondaga County emergency professionals want to prepare central New York for a potential disaster.  First they want to know whether everyday citizens are ready for anything from the storm of the century to an act of terrorism.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he intends to propose in his State of the State message several recommendations from a disaster preparedness commission, to help the state better cope with major storms in the future.