Donald Trump

NPR News is providing live coverage of all three Presidential debates and one Vice Presidential debate this fall. Special coverage begins at 9 p.m. each night on WRVO, without any interruption. Following the debate, NPR's Robert Siegel and reporters will provide analysis and fact-checking.

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A new poll shows that Hillary Clinton is still far ahead of Donald Trump among New York voters — but she has some weak points.

Clinton holds a 21-point lead over Trump among likely New York voters in the Siena College poll, down from a 25-point lead one month ago.

But Clinton has some weaknesses. She is viewed unfavorably by just over half of voters and does not have much support beyond registered Democrats, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

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With a little less than two months before election day, Onondaga County’s Republican Party is hoping to move forward with a united front. A potential challenger to Chair Tom Dadey’s leadership was brought into the fold after a weekend of intense discussions.

This NPR News special will examine the characters of both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. The 2016 Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are the most unpopular candidates since modern polling began. But why is that the case?

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New York state’s Republican Party chairman is talking up Donald Trump and predicted that the GOP presidential candidate will do well in New York state.

Ed Cox said Trump has been looking presidential lately, appearing in Mexico alongside that country’s president, and visiting flood-ravaged Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Cox said Trump’s strength is that he’s a “self-made politician.”

“And a genius of a politician, you have to admit,” Cox said.

New York State Senate

There’s more evidence that the presidential race may affect which party will control the state Senate.

Currently, the GOP is holding on, with the help of one Democrat who meets with them.

But a new Siena College poll finds that nearly two-thirds of voters think that Donald Trump at the top of the ticket will not help Republicans hold on to the Senate, and Hillary Clinton as the Democratic candidate will actually help Democrats regain the Senate, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

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A new poll that finds Donald Trump badly trailing Hillary Clinton in the presidential race in New York could be good news for Democrats in the state Senate.

Trump’s supporters in New York had hoped that the state could be in play for the Queens native. But the latest poll from Siena College finds that Clinton, who has adopted New York as her home, is ahead of Trump by 30 points — 57 percent to 27 percent — in a two-way race.

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Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) still hasn’t publicly endorsed Republican Donald Trump for president, and state party officials aren’t too happy about it. Katko is running for reelection in a congressional district that has changed parties for the last five election cycles, and has expressed concern over Trump’s tone and divisive rhetoric, saying Trump will have to earn his vote. New York State Republican Party Chair Ed Cox says he understands Katko’s reluctance.

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The Republican Party has opened up a political headquarters for the Donald Trump presidential campaign in Syracuse. Elected officials, volunteers and Donald Trump fans crowded into an Erie Boulevard office space to get a pep talk from state Republican Party Chairman Ed Cox as the area’s Trump headquarters officially opened on Friday.

"The momentum is on our side, the big mo. And by the way, what does that mean? Come November 8, we’re going to have a Republican President of the United States, Donald Trump,” Cox said. “And that’s what it’s all about.”

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Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-Willsboro) visited New York Air Brake in Watertown Friday on a campaign stop. She spoke about how the Import-Export bank helps U.S. manufacturers compete internationally. Stefanik helped reform the bank.

“When American workers are able to compete on a level playing field there is no other country that is manufacturing the highest quality of products that the U.S. is,” said Stefanik.  

After her brief speech, the question and answer period turned to the presidential campaign.

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Republicans in central New York are still angry with Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) and his decision to back Democrat Hillary Clinton instead of Republican Donald Trump in the race for president.  

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Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) added his voice to a chorus of criticism regarding Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s comments to the Muslim parents of an Army captain killed in Iraq.

“We ought to revere our Gold Star mothers,” Schumer said. “We ought to praise them. We are to not be criticizing them. My heart goes out to these people who made the ultimate sacrifice and criticism of them is very, very wrong.”

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Democratic congressional candidate Colleen Deacon is calling out her Republican opponent, Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus), for not criticizing Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump over comments he made about Gold Star parents of a U.S. Army captain killed in Iraq in 2004.

During the Democratic National Convention, Khizr Khan, father of Capt. Humayun Khan, talked about the loss of his son in Iraq. Trump tweeted several apparent criticisms of Khan and his wife, and the public feud has continued for nearly a week. 

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Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) Tuesday became the first Republican member of Congress to say he will vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton for president in November. 

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New York’s delegates have high hopes for their nominee Donald Trump’s speech tonight, but some also want him to tone down some of his rhetoric and act more presidential.

State GOP Chair Ed Cox said a “great acceptance speech” will help to unite the party and fire everyone up for November. He defined that as something more serious than the sometimes rambling addresses that are very popular at Trump rallies.

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Among the many Republican public officials sitting out of this week's GOP national convention is central New York Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld). The moderate congressman reiterated that he does not support nor will he vote for the GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

"A lot of people are just looking for an outlet to react to their -- I think rightful -- disdain, disgust with government," Hanna said. "But electing someone who's not competent to do the job is the opposite of what I think people should be doing."

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New York’s delegation at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland heard from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich at their breakfast meeting Monday. Gingrich offered them a game plan for winning in New York state in November.

Former House Speaker, professor and now author of dystopic thrillers, Newt Gingrich spoke as an official Donald Trump surrogate. He offered the delegates what he called a game plan to win typically Democratic New York state away from Hillary Clinton in the presidential race. He says the political landscape is rapidly shifting, and New York City is key.

Karen DeWitt

Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt is reporting from the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio this week. DeWitt, along with regular contributors to New York Now, will be bringing us podcasts from the road featuring members of each party.

Karen DeWitt

The Republican National Convention begins in Cleveland Monday. New York state Republicans will hear from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker, who are billed as official Trump-Pence surrogates, as well as CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow.

Republican State Party Chair Ed Cox says he doesn’t think the delegates need a lot of convincing, though he admits that many of them initially supported others in what was originally a 16-candidate race.

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As the Republican National Convention gets underway this week in Cleveland, one high-profile central New York Republican will be watching from afar.  Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) who is running for reelection in a highly competitive central New York district, continues to distance himself from the presumptive GOP presidential nominee.

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Supporters of the two outsider candidates in the presidential race are finding obstacles to attending the national conventions in Philadelphia and Cleveland, held during the next couple of weeks.

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Republican Wendy Long is taking another shot at running for U.S. Senate in New York state. The conservative lawyer from New York City lost a race against Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand four years ago in a landslide. This year, she’s taking on the man who could become the next Democratic Party leader in the Senate, Charles Schumer.

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Some central New York Republican officials say there’s a little more excitement at their annual clambake this year, because of presumptive GOP presidential hopeful Donald Trump.

Every year Republicans from central New York gather at Hinerwadels Grove in North Syracuse to eat clams and talk politics. And presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump was at the center of many conversations.

Onondaga County GOP Chair Tom Dadey says he’s seen more excitement locally about Trump than any other Republican candidate in years.

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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton won resoundingly in New York's primary Tuesday, including in Onondaga County. But a look at the numbers shows that the county's results stand out in central New York.

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Criticism of clashes between Donald Trump Supporters and opponents of the Republican candidate for president, has led to a unique dynamic at Trump rallies. It was no different in Trump’s turn in downtown Syracuse Saturday, when his speech was broken up several times by protesters who had to be led out of the venue.

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At a rally in Watertown Saturday, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump touched on his familiar campaign promises to secure the borders and boost military funding.

Trump told an enthusiastic crowd that the flow of heroin and other illegal drugs into the country would end with his proposed wall along the Mexican border. Under his administration, Trump said Watertown will get jobs back and heroin out.

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The presidential candidates and their surrogates traveled throughout upstate this weekend, trying to drum up support and encourage New Yorkers to vote for them in Tuesday's primary.

Meanwhile, more than 250 people protested outside Donald Trump’s rally in Syracuse on Saturday. Many were students upset with Trump's language on immigration.

On the eve of the New York presidential primary, Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher talks with two area party chairs. Janet Burman, who heads up the Syracuse City Republican Committee, and Mark English, chair of the Onondaga County Democratic Committee.  They discuss the controversies and turmoils in the nominating process, the restrictive voting rules in New York State, and aspects of the candidates’ campaigns and positions.

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This afternoon, Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz held a rally in the town of Cicero. Speaking to a large and enthusiastic crowd, he said jobs, freedom and security are the most important issues in this election. Cruz said repealing Obamacare, passing a flat tax, limiting financial regulations and cracking down on illegal immigration will improve the economy.

All three Republican presidential candidates spoke at the state GOP dinner Thursday night.

Trump spent much of his speech recounting his real estate deals in New York City, saying he built the very hotel where the event was held -- the Hyatt at Grand Central Station.

He also defended New York values as embodied after 9/11 when New Yorkers displayed courage and selflessness.

“These are the values that we need to make America great again,” Trump told the audience. “We need these values to bring America together again, and the heal America’s wounds.”

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