Donald Trump

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Central New Yorkers who oppose a sweeping overhaul to the tax code supported by Republicans and President Donald Trump made their case outside a roundtable meeting with Small Business Administrator Linda McMahon and local congressional representatives in Syracuse today.

The proposed changes take away certain deductions, like state and local taxes, but increases a taxpayers personal deduction. Opponents like Sharon Owens of Syracuse call that a scam.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

This is part of a series looking at each candidate running for mayor of Syracuse. You can find our stories featuring the other candidates for Syracuse mayor at the bottom of this page. 

If elected, Syracuse mayoral candidate Juanita Perez Williams would be the first Latina mayor in New York State. Despite that historic possibility, Perez Williams said her candidacy is about changing the city.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Local substance use clinics in central New York are reacting to President Donald Trump’s declaration of the opioid crisis as a public health emergency. Some officials said there are real solutions the federal government can do to save lives.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

The fallout continues from President Donald Trump’s decision to end subsidies to health insurance companies to help lower-income Americans pay for their health insurance. But it’s still unclear what the exact impact will be in New York.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

The tax overhaul plan proposed by President Donald Trump and now being considered in Congress would end the deduction on federal income tax forms for state and local property taxes. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said it would disproportionately harm New Yorkers, where property taxes are among the highest in the nation, and he’s taken opportunities at recent public events to make the case against the plan.

Fort Drum & 10th Mountain Division / Flickr

President Donald Trump is committing more troops to Afghanistan, and that could include some soldiers from Fort Drum.

Brian Ashley with the Fort Drum Regional Liaison Organization says Fort Drum has been a fixture in Afghanistan since the beginning of what has become America's longest war.

"The 10th Mountain Division was essentially the first unit on the ground into Afghanistan back in 2001 and we were among the last elements - in terms of combat - to leave Afghanistan," Ashley said.

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump addressed the nation Monday night on U.S. engagement and "the path forward" in Afghanistan and South Asia. Senior U.S. officials told NPR's Tom Bowman ahead of the speech that the president is expected to deploy about 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan, though Trump did not give specifics during the speech. The decision follows months of deliberation within the Trump administration, involving top military commanders, political advisers and even enlisted veterans of the nearly 16-year war.

MONICA SANDRECZKI / WSKG News

Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-New Hartford) visited Binghamton Wednesday, but refused to talk to reporters about President Trump’s comments on Charlottesville.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

A yearly procession to commemorate the use of nuclear weapons on Hiroshima and Nagasaki Japan took place in Syracuse yesterday. Organizers said the drive to abolish nuclear weapons is more important than ever in today’s political climate.

Activist Rea Kramer said we can not forget the destruction that followed the use of nuclear weapons over 70 years ago.

"I think we should all be especially anxious now because there is a president who uses the words, “fire and fury,” as a response to the threatening postures of North Korea," Kramer said.

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New York Now / WMHT

The former EPA regional administrator under President Barack Obama said scientists who leaked the report about further evidence of climate change to The New York Times should be commended as “whistleblowers.”

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Upstate New York, like the rest of the country, has suffered through decades of job losses in manufacturing. But some manufacturing companies in the Mohawk Valley and Southern Tier can’t find enough skilled workers to fill job openings.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

President Donald Trump says upstate New York is not working and people are "getting very badly hurt." The president made the comments during a recent interview with the Wall Street Journal, suggesting people leave the area in search of better work elsewhere.

Trump's remarks were made while he was talking about Foxconn, a Chinese manufacturer, that he says will open a LCD flat-screen manufacturing plant in Wisconsin.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

At an event Thursday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo defined the conflict over changing the health care laws in Washington as a class struggle, saying it’s all about the rich versus the rest.

Cuomo did not mention President Donald Trump by name, but he said the nation’s health care is in crisis and the struggle is really about those with lots of money, and those with lesser means.

“Make no mistake. The rich are always going to have the best health care system in the world,” Cuomo said. “What they’re trying to decide is what’s the health care for the rest of us.”

WhiteHouse.Gov

President Donald Trump hosted the owners of Oneida County's Sherrill Manufacturing at the White House Wednesday for a "Made in America" showcase. At a roundtable discussion with 20 small businesses, he praised the company's co-owner Gregg Owens for being the country's only remaining silverware manufacturer.

"What happened?" Trump asked.

"Well, everybody else went overseas chasing cheap labor," Owens said.

"That's terrible," Trump said. "I'm not surprised, but it is really somewhat surprising when you say the only. That's a hell of a statement."

Rep. John Katko / Facebook File Photo

Several New York representatives are joining the calls for the federal government to declare the flooding along Lake Ontario a disaster. The move would bring federal funding and assistance to the recovery process.

WRVO News File Photo

Central New York Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) has some harsh words for his fellow Republicans about how they are handling health care reform.

Payne Horning / WRVO News (file photo)

An attempt to get the U.S. military to buy utensils solely from an Oneida County factory, the only silverware manufacturer in the country, was unsuccessful, but Sherrill Manufacturing's CEO is optimistic about a meeting the company has at the White House this week.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) kicked off a series of town halls across the state at Syracuse University Friday. The generally friendly audience gave Gillibrand a warm reception but asked questions on the biggest issues facing Washington.

Gillibrand was welcomed with a standing ovation but the attention quickly turned to health care and President Donald Trump. Gillibrand called the Republican health care bill "terrible" and said millions of people could lose coverage.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

While a new poll finds New Yorkers would like Gov. Andrew Cuomo to be a “national leader” challenging the policies of President Donald Trump’s administration, Cuomo seldom actually mentions the president by name.

Cuomo has railed against the Republican plans in Washington to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, singling out two New York GOP congressmen, Chris Collins and John Faso, who have proposed an amendment to charge the state $2.3 billion to pay for county Medicaid costs.

“Faso-Collins is a shell game,” Cuomo said.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

Christopher Wray, President Trump’s nominee for FBI Director, faces the Senate Judiciary Committee today for his confirmation hearing. Wray would replace James Comey, whom Trump fired in May.

Wray served in the Justice Department under President George W. Bush and currently works on white-collar crime at an international law firm. Given Comey's dismissal and ongoing investigations into Russian interference in the U.S. election and potential ties to the Trump campaign, senators are expected to press Wray on his independence and integrity.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

When President Donald Trump announced that the United States is leaving the Paris climate accord, Gov. Andrew Cuomo took the opportunity to say New York will not. The Democratic governor pledged to uphold the international agreement, formed a multi-state partnership and promised to take aggressive action to tackle climate change, but much of that work was already underway. 

Catherine Loper / WRVO News

The New York State Legislature is back at the Capitol for three weeks of meetings before the session ends later in June. A number of advocacy groups say there’s an opportunity for lawmakers to act to address some of the harm that they say President Donald Trump’s policies are causing. But divisions in the Legislature may hinder any chance of achievements.

Matt Churchill / Flickr

President Donald Trump, who’s never been very popular in New York, has reached an all-time low in the opinions of voters, according to a new poll.

According to the Siena College survey, Trump is viewed unfavorably by about two-thirds — 65 percent — of New Yorkers, with only his core base of some of the state’s Republicans still standing by the president. Sixty-three percent of registered GOP members who were surveyed believe Trump is doing an excellent or good job in office.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is sharply critical of President Donald Trump's proposed budget. The $4.1 trillion spending plan calls for steep cuts in a range of support programs for low-income individuals to balance the federal government's books over the next decade.

While in Oswego County Wednesday, Cuomo called it an ultra-conservative version of President Ronald Reagan's economic approach to governing.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

While the town hall went on inside, protesters vented their frustrations about Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) outside the venue at Onondaga Community College. The rally organized by CNY Solidarity, objected to the rules and random selection of audience members at the town hall.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

CNY Solidarity protesters are demanding Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) vote to release President Donald Trump’s tax returns. Protesters like Jonah Minkoff-Zern waited outside for Katko at a Wednesday event in Syracuse.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Central New Yorkers rang in President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office in starkly different rallies in Syracuse this weekend. The two events Saturday were only a few miles away, but the political distance between the two groups seemed much farther.

At one event, hundreds marched to Syracuse’s Inner Harbor in coordination with climate change demonstrations across the country. They carried signs blasting the Trump administration for rolling back environmental regulations. Jacqueline King’s sign called for his impeachment.

Gage Skidmore / via Flickr

Several New York state lawmakers are sponsoring a bill that they say would force President Donald Trump to make his state tax returns public.

Trump broke with a more than 40-year tradition of presidential candidates and presidents voluntarily releasing their tax returns. Trump has said he can’t release his returns because he is under audit.

In the 1970s, President Richard Nixon began the practice of releasing the tax filings, even though Nixon himself was under federal audit at the time. Since then, every president has voluntarily released his tax returns.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

It’s become traditional to measure a president’s first 100 days in office. For President Donald Trump, that milestone occurs on Saturday. Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) says he isn’t ready to grade the president, but he does have some thoughts about how Trump has been doing.

"The Response: America's Story" seeks listeners' unique stories about they lives they lead, and their hopes for the next four years. The series offers Americans a chance to share their realities and reflections with the world.

The fourth segment of the series asks "How has the first 100 days of the Trump presidency affected you?" We hear Americans' answers on Sunday, April 30 at 7 p.m.

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