Donald Trump

Office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is due to release his budget Tuesday. Revenues are down, and the repeal of the Affordable Care Act could cost the state billions of dollars. So what should residents expect?

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On January 20, WRVO and NPR News will offer special live-coverage of the Presidential Inauguration. Tune in from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. as hosts Steve Inskeep and Audie Cornish co-host from the Capitol in Washington, D.C.

The Inauguration

From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., NPR News will feature the swearing in of the President and Vice-President; plus speeches, newsmaker interviews, live reports from around the Capitol and the National Mall, and analysis from NPR's Political Team.

Continuing coverage: The inaugural luncheon and parade

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The NPR Politics team and reporters across the newsroom will be live-annotating a news conference with President-elect Donald Trump, expected at 11 a.m. today.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Some central New Yorkers are urging Congress to reject some of President-elect Donald Trump’s cabinet picks. They brought their message to the Federal Building during a protest in Syracuse Monday. 

Syracuse physician Marianna Kaufman is part of the newly formed CNY Solidarity coalition. She says that group is particularly against four Trump nominees they call climate change deniers.

Maxwell School at Syracuse University

For many voters, one of the most eagerly anticipated changes from the new Trump administration is a significant tax cut.  What are the contours of the likely cuts, and how will they will affect the politics of other significant social policies, like Medicare and Social Security?  Could the cuts stimulate enough economic growth to pay for themselves?  This week on the Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher is joined by a leading expert on tax policy, Len Burman, the director of the Tax Policy Center, a joint project of the Urban and Brookings Institutes.

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Onondaga County Comptroller Bob Antonacci is being considered for a job in the Trump administration. The Republican says he was approached by members of the Trump transition team to consider a job as the U.S. attorney for New York’s Northern District.

It’s a job in the past that generally goes to someone with experience as a prosecutor. Antonacci is a civil attorney, but says it’s more than the experience in the courtroom that counts.

Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

Rep.-elect Claudia Tenney from the 22nd Congressional District says she is going to keep an open mind as the administration of incoming president Donald Trump takes shape. Tenney supported Trump during the election, but the Republican has some doubts about some of his decisions thus far.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

The next representative from the 22nd Congressional District, Claudia Tenney, is supportive of president-elect Donald Trump's approach on foreign policy matters thus far. And as his inauguration day approaches, she says more Americans need to give him the benefit of the doubt.

Courtesy Tom Dadey

Central New York is closely watching how President-elect Donald Trump is molding his administration, and now has one central New Yorker with a seat at the table.

Onondaga County Republican Party Chair Tom Dadey was named to Trump’s transition team last week. He was an early supporter of Trump, and ultimately became the co-chair of Trump’s New York state campaign. He says the transition appointment puts him in the position of helping fill thousands of lower level jobs in the Trump administration.

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Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) is encouraging central New Yorkers to come together regarding a plan for the future of Interstate 81 through Syracuse. The Democrat says he’s ready to work with President-elect Donald Trump on infrastructure, but he warns against a divided community.

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President-elect Donald Trump has promised to repeal the Affordable Health Care Act — also known as Obamacare — and replace it with something else. While no one really knows what that means, one health care analyst with a prominent Albany think tank said New York could be billions of dollars in the hole as a result.

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The New York attorney general has proposed a package of bills aimed at improving to what he said are “arcane” and “ridiculous” voting laws that bar many potential New York voters from casting ballots.

Attorney General Eric Schneiderman began a statewide inquiry after his office received a record number of complaints about lack of voter access during the April presidential primary.

“In New York, we have what amounts to legal voter suppression,” Schneiderman said Tuesday at a news conference in Albany.

Will disillusioned U.S. voters really move to Canada?

Nov 21, 2016
http://www.cic.gc.ca

The election of Donald Trump has some Americans looking north, perhaps to make a new home in a country removed from Trump's style of Republicanism.

Many said jokingly if Trump were elected they would move to Canada. For some, it's no longer a joke.

"You'll never be my president because I'm moving to Canada!" shouted one woman at a protest.

The declaration was born in anger and frustration, but also reflects what many Americans have been soberly contemplating.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Airports could be getting some love with the current emphasis on infrastructure improvements. President-elect Donald Trump has often mentioned airports as a key part of infrastructure improvements he would like to see, and New York state continues investing in airports. And these are things local airport officials are happy to hear.

Provided by Tom Dadey

Onondaga County Republican Chairman Tom Dadey gave a very early endorsement to President-elect Donald Trump and Dadey was with Trump on election night. Dadey said he does not think it will be bad for the region for Trump to know that he has friends in Onondaga County.

After the election results were in, Dadey said Trump was statesmen-like and gracious when Trump came down with his family to address supporters at the New York Hilton Midtown Hotel.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Unofficial election results show a slight increase in turnout among New Yorkers this year as compared to 2012, but turnout in many northern and central New York counties decreased.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is adopting a more conciliatory tone toward President-elect Donald Trump, after Cuomo called Trump “un-New York” in the final days of the campaign.

Cuomo, in the final days of the campaign, stumped for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in New York state, and heavily criticized Donald Trump.

“In truth, Trump is un-New York,” Cuomo said. “Everything the man stands for is the exact opposite that this state stands for.”

Trump, like Cuomo is a Queens native.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

About 150 anti-Trump protesters rallied in downtown Syracuse Wednesday night. Protesters were angered by both Republicans and Democrats. They condemned Trump for what they said was bigoted rhetoric on the campaign trail that expressed Islamophobia and xenophobia.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican Rep. John Katko is the first incumbent in more than a decade to be reelected to the 24th Congressional District. The district flipped back and forth between Republicans and Democrats in the past four congressional election cycles.

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New York is poised to elect Hillary Clinton for president and give Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) a fourth term, but down-ballot races for Congress and state Senate are less certain.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

One of the most active Trump groups in central New York was out in full force this weekend, stumping for their candidate.

Oneida County Trump supporters carrying signs, wearing bumper stickers and waving flags got a lot of attention from passing motorists during their final rally in Rome before Election Day. It’s a group of like-minded citizens, that’s been growing organically, meeting twice a week for months. And supporters like Joseph Rezendes, who says he’s sick of career politicians, makes no apologies for supporting the controversial candidate.

kristen_a / Flickr

A final poll in the long presidential race shows the contest tightening a bit in New York state, though Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton still leads Republican Donald Trump by double digits.

Siena College spokesman Steve Greenberg says while Clinton is still 17 points ahead of Trump in New York state, she’s lost ground in the past few weeks among independents.

He says Clinton and Trump are now tied among independents in the downstate suburbs.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Hillary Clinton’s widening lead over Donald Trump is likely to affect downballot races for Congress, where there are several contested seats, and for control of the state Senate in New York, where Republicans are barely clinging to the majority.

As recently as the summer, when the presidential candidates were tied in the polls, leading New York Republicans predicted that the state would be in play for Trump — and that he could even help get downballot GOP candidates for Congress and the state Legislature elected.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

With less than three weeks before Election Day, Hillary Clinton is even further ahead of Donald Trump in New York state, and that could affect downballot races, including seats for the state Senate.

Clinton is 24 points ahead of Trump, at 54 percent to 30 percent, a jump from when Siena College did a survey in September. Spokesman Steve Greenberg said the biggest change is independents moving over to the Democratic presidential candidate’s camp. A two-point lead among independents for Clinton has grown to a 17-point lead.

Meg Kelly / NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate tonight at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact checking from NPR reporters and editors.

Follow along on-air; the debate airs live starting at 9 p.m., uninterrupted. You can also tune in for the pre-debate call in show at 8 p.m. on WRVO.

Tune in for the latest in the Intelligence Squared U.S. series, this time examining the "Trump phenomenon" and the forthcoming election.

The elites of both parties have expressed contempt for Donald Trump, and Trump has succeeded in part by channeling his voters' contempt for the elites. Does support for Trump reflect an uninformed populism and misplaced anger by a large swatch of the American electorate? Or have the elites failed to empathize with their struggles, and failed to craft effective policies to help them cope?

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The discord over the presidential election continues to filter down into a race for Congress in central New York. The question of whether freshman Republican Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) would support Donald Trump continues to dog the campaign for the 24th Congressional District.

The questions started coming this spring: would Katko, trying to win re-election in a district rated as a toss-up, support Trump, a controversial nominee.

New York State Senate

Democrats in New York are trying to keep the heat on Republicans running for office over the coarse remarks made by GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump in a leaked video.

Every day since Friday’s release of the tape — where Donald Trump disparages women in a crude manner — Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, has slammed Trump. And he’s urged New York Republicans to disassociate themselves from the top of their ticket.

“They should stand up and say, ‘I’m a Republican, but I’m a New Yorker first,’” Cuomo said. “‘And we’ll have nothing to do with the degradation of women.’”

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is keeping the heat on New York Republicans to disown Donald Trump after the GOP presidential candidate’s coarse remarks about women revealed in a video over the weekend.

Cuomo said he does not think Trump turned around his troubled candidacy in Sunday night’s debate performance and, for the third day in arrow, called on New York Republicans to reject their party’s presidential nominee.

“They should stand up and say ‘I’m a Republican, but I’m a New Yorker first,’” Cuomo said. “‘And we’ll have nothing to do with the degradation of women.'”

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is one of many Democrats condemning Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for his newly-released statements in 2005, where he spoke of women in vulgar terms, and described actions that many view as sexual assault.

“This was a disrespectful, sexist, derogatory statement about all women, and it should be condemned,” Cuomo said, speaking after a briefing on an accident on the Long Island Railroad Sunday.

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