Donald Trump

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Republican Wendy Long is taking another shot at running for U.S. Senate in New York state. The conservative lawyer from New York City lost a race against Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand four years ago in a landslide. This year, she’s taking on the man who could become the next Democratic Party leader in the Senate, Charles Schumer.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

Some central New York Republican officials say there’s a little more excitement at their annual clambake this year, because of presumptive GOP presidential hopeful Donald Trump.

Every year Republicans from central New York gather at Hinerwadels Grove in North Syracuse to eat clams and talk politics. And presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump was at the center of many conversations.

Onondaga County GOP Chair Tom Dadey says he’s seen more excitement locally about Trump than any other Republican candidate in years.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton won resoundingly in New York's primary Tuesday, including in Onondaga County. But a look at the numbers shows that the county's results stand out in central New York.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Criticism of clashes between Donald Trump Supporters and opponents of the Republican candidate for president, has led to a unique dynamic at Trump rallies. It was no different in Trump’s turn in downtown Syracuse Saturday, when his speech was broken up several times by protesters who had to be led out of the venue.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

At a rally in Watertown Saturday, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump touched on his familiar campaign promises to secure the borders and boost military funding.

Trump told an enthusiastic crowd that the flow of heroin and other illegal drugs into the country would end with his proposed wall along the Mexican border. Under his administration, Trump said Watertown will get jobs back and heroin out.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The presidential candidates and their surrogates traveled throughout upstate this weekend, trying to drum up support and encourage New Yorkers to vote for them in Tuesday's primary.

Meanwhile, more than 250 people protested outside Donald Trump’s rally in Syracuse on Saturday. Many were students upset with Trump's language on immigration.

On the eve of the New York presidential primary, Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher talks with two area party chairs. Janet Burman, who heads up the Syracuse City Republican Committee, and Mark English, chair of the Onondaga County Democratic Committee.  They discuss the controversies and turmoils in the nominating process, the restrictive voting rules in New York State, and aspects of the candidates’ campaigns and positions.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

This afternoon, Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz held a rally in the town of Cicero. Speaking to a large and enthusiastic crowd, he said jobs, freedom and security are the most important issues in this election. Cruz said repealing Obamacare, passing a flat tax, limiting financial regulations and cracking down on illegal immigration will improve the economy.

All three Republican presidential candidates spoke at the state GOP dinner Thursday night.

Trump spent much of his speech recounting his real estate deals in New York City, saying he built the very hotel where the event was held -- the Hyatt at Grand Central Station.

He also defended New York values as embodied after 9/11 when New Yorkers displayed courage and selflessness.

“These are the values that we need to make America great again,” Trump told the audience. “We need these values to bring America together again, and the heal America’s wounds.”

Michael Mroziak / WBFO News

During his speech in Rome Tuesday, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump took aim at the GOP and the way some of its state organizations award their delegates. 

The New York State Republican Party’s annual dinner Thursday evening will feature all three GOP presidential candidates, likely the only time they will all be together in one place before Tuesday’s primary.

Donald Trump, Ted Cruz and John Kasich are all due at the event in New York City, though they will all be speaking separately, says Republican State Party Chair Ed Cox.

Cox, who is remaining neutral in the race, says the intense focus on New York can only be good overall for party participation and voter turnout.

CSIS/Matt A.J. / Flickr via CC License 2.0 http://bit.ly/1ZNeCAw

A poll from Siena College finds that Bernie Sanders has narrowed the gap with Hillary Clinton in the New York presidential primary race, but Clinton leads in key voting groups.

The poll finds Clinton ten points ahead of Sanders, at 52 percent to 42 percent, but Clinton is ahead in voter-rich New York City and the surrounding suburbs. The two are even in upstate, but only around one-quarter of total Democratic voters live there.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

A new poll finds that Bernie Sanders has narrowed the gap with Hillary Clinton among likely Democratic voters in the New York residential primary race, but Clinton leads in key voting regions.

The Siena College poll finds that while 52 percent of Democrats would vote for Hillary Clinton, compared to 42 percent for Bernie Sanders, Clinton is ahead in voter-rich New York City and surrounding suburbs. The two are even in upstate, but that represents just around one-quarter of total Democratic voters. Siena’s Steve Greenberg says there’s also an age divide between the two candidates.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke to a packed crowd in an airplane hangar at Griffiss International Airport in Rome on Tuesday. Trump hit hard on New York’s economy and the political system.

Trump started by pulling no punches as he listed statistics about the loss of manufacturing jobs in the Utica-Rome area and the median household income in the state. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Although he was stumping for Democratic primary voters in Syracuse Tuesday, presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders set his sights on Republican front-runner Donald Trump.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke at a packed arena in Albany Monday night, where he was interrupted by protesters numerous times.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News (file photo)

After campaigning in Rochester and Albany over the last few days, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump will bring his campaign to Rome on Tuesday. Trump will hold an event at Griffiss International Airport at 4:00 p.m.

Thousands attend Trump rally in Rochester

Apr 11, 2016
WXXI News

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump made his first campaign visit to upstate New York in Rochester Sunday. But just how many people attended the rally is open to a bit of debate, with estimates ranging anywhere from 6,000 to about 9,000 people at an airport hangar.

But what was obvious was that the vast majority of those attending are true believers. From the opening speakers for the event -- including Buffalo businessman Carl Paladino -- to the main act itself, the crowd often broke into chants, that sometimes just included yelling "Trump, Trump" over and over again.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

As New York’s April 19 primary vote approaches, Republican presidential hopeful John Kasich started his upstate politicking in Syracuse Friday night at a town hall at Le Moyne College. 

Kasich is the underdog in the three-man race for the GOP nomination. He’s running third, with 143 delegates, when more than 1,237 are needed to win the nomination. And that logistical hurdle was on the mind of many of the more than 1,000 people who came out to see the Ohio governor at the Le Moyne College Athletic Center.

Hillary Clinton brings campaign to Rochester

Apr 9, 2016
WXXI News

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton made her first Rochester stop in the New York Primary campaign Friday night. The economy was a major theme.

Both Clinton and her Democratic rival, Bernie Sanders have been focusing a lot of attention on the economy, and that's especially key in upstate New York, which has been beset by manufacturing job losses in recent years.

During her speech at Monroe Community College, Clinton talked about the efforts at that college, as well as at the University of Rochester and RIT to help train the workforce.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News File Photo

New York Republican Committee Chairman Ed Cox said because the campaigns in both the Republican and Democratic races are so close, New York could play a pivotal role. He calls it the state's New Hampshire moment.

"It’s the first time in the history of the Republican presidential primaries in New York state that the primary really could make a crucial difference in who our nominee would be and who the next president of the United States would be," Cox said.

Clinton: Gage Skidmore; Rest: Michael Vadon / Flickr CC ShareAlike: http://bit.ly/1WqgUpo

New York's presidential primary is here. Polls are open around upstate New York from noon until 9:00 p.m. today and is open to registered Democrats and Republicans only. The deadline to change party affiliation was last October. You can find your party affiliation and polling place from the state Board of Elections. Join us for special coverage of the New York primary, from WNYC and NPR, tonight starting at 8:00 p.m. on WRVO. 

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Speaking to a crowd of around 2,000 who waited for hours in the cold to hear the address at Cohoes High School in the Albany area, Clinton focused on economic issues, saying she’d push for rebuilding crumbling infrastructures, and mentioning the ongoing water crisis in nearby Hoosick Falls. She also promised to bring back jobs to the once-thriving mill town and other struggling cities in New York.

“I will be the president who brings manufacturing back to upstate New York and America,” Clinton said, to loud cheers.

CSIS/Matt A.J. / Flickr via CC License 2.0 http://bit.ly/1ZNeCAw

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump lead among New York voters ahead of the state's presidential primary on April 19, according to a poll released Thursday by Quinnipiac University.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Ahead of the Empire State's April 19 primary, Donald Trump supporters in central New York are organizing to gain support for the presidential candidate.

In Utica's historic train station, a group of Mohawk Valley citizens gathered to say they think the country is off track and Trump is the only candidate who can help.

"We've been going in the wrong direction for too long, in particular the last eight years," Perry Onderdonk said. "He's achieved personal greatness and I think he can apply his business acumen to fixing what's wrong with our country today."

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

As many national GOP leaders are calling on Republicans to vote for Sen. Ted Cruz in the presidential contest to stop front runner Donald Trump, central New York Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) said "without equivocation" he will not support either of those candidates in New York's presidential primary on April 19 or in the general election. 

"Ted Cruz shut down the government. That's his one accomplishment," Hanna said, referencing the senator's attempts to strip funding from the Affordable Care Act in 2013 that led to a standoff between Congress and the White House.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News (file photo)

In 2014, Donald Trump attended a Republican fundraiser in Syracuse as he floated the idea of running for governor of New York.  Some of the talking points and style Trump now uses on the presidential campaign trail can be heard in that earlier speech.

With just over a month to go before New York’s presidential primary, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are leading their respective party voters in a new poll.

According to a new Siena College poll, Trump is nearly 30 points ahead of his nearest challengers, Marco Rubio and John Kasich, among Republicans. Hillary Clinton leads Bernie Sanders in the Democratic race by 21 points.

Courtesy Tom Dadey

Onondaga County Republican Chairman Tom Dadey is endorsing Donald Trump for president. Dadey and Trump go back a few years to 2014, when he was part of a group that met with Trump to discuss a run for governor. Trump at one point came to Syracuse for a GOP fundraiser, and Dadey has been a fan ever since.

"Our economy is sluggish, we’re not respected in the world and we need somebody who is going to be a good strong leader, and I believe that is Donald Trump," Dadey said.

He said he’s not the only one in central New York with that opinion.

Paladino urges New York Republicans to back Trump

Jan 1, 2016
Michael Mroziak / WBFO News

While the New York Primary is just under four months away, former gubernatorial candidate and western New York businessman Carl Paladino is encouraging Republicans to back Donald Trump's presidential bid now.

Paladino expressed his support for Trump's campaign in an open letter to the state's Republicans, and urges party leadership not to be neutral, especially with state Democratic party leaders already backing Hillary Clinton.

In Paladino's opinion, GOP leadership in New York state is too establishment-minded. 

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