Donald Trump

Will disillusioned U.S. voters really move to Canada?

Nov 21, 2016
http://www.cic.gc.ca

The election of Donald Trump has some Americans looking north, perhaps to make a new home in a country removed from Trump's style of Republicanism.

Many said jokingly if Trump were elected they would move to Canada. For some, it's no longer a joke.

"You'll never be my president because I'm moving to Canada!" shouted one woman at a protest.

The declaration was born in anger and frustration, but also reflects what many Americans have been soberly contemplating.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Airports could be getting some love with the current emphasis on infrastructure improvements. President-elect Donald Trump has often mentioned airports as a key part of infrastructure improvements he would like to see, and New York state continues investing in airports. And these are things local airport officials are happy to hear.

Provided by Tom Dadey

Onondaga County Republican Chairman Tom Dadey gave a very early endorsement to President-elect Donald Trump and Dadey was with Trump on election night. Dadey said he does not think it will be bad for the region for Trump to know that he has friends in Onondaga County.

After the election results were in, Dadey said Trump was statesmen-like and gracious when Trump came down with his family to address supporters at the New York Hilton Midtown Hotel.

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Unofficial election results show a slight increase in turnout among New Yorkers this year as compared to 2012, but turnout in many northern and central New York counties decreased.

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo is adopting a more conciliatory tone toward President-elect Donald Trump, after Cuomo called Trump “un-New York” in the final days of the campaign.

Cuomo, in the final days of the campaign, stumped for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in New York state, and heavily criticized Donald Trump.

“In truth, Trump is un-New York,” Cuomo said. “Everything the man stands for is the exact opposite that this state stands for.”

Trump, like Cuomo is a Queens native.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

About 150 anti-Trump protesters rallied in downtown Syracuse Wednesday night. Protesters were angered by both Republicans and Democrats. They condemned Trump for what they said was bigoted rhetoric on the campaign trail that expressed Islamophobia and xenophobia.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican Rep. John Katko is the first incumbent in more than a decade to be reelected to the 24th Congressional District. The district flipped back and forth between Republicans and Democrats in the past four congressional election cycles.

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New York is poised to elect Hillary Clinton for president and give Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) a fourth term, but down-ballot races for Congress and state Senate are less certain.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

One of the most active Trump groups in central New York was out in full force this weekend, stumping for their candidate.

Oneida County Trump supporters carrying signs, wearing bumper stickers and waving flags got a lot of attention from passing motorists during their final rally in Rome before Election Day. It’s a group of like-minded citizens, that’s been growing organically, meeting twice a week for months. And supporters like Joseph Rezendes, who says he’s sick of career politicians, makes no apologies for supporting the controversial candidate.

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A final poll in the long presidential race shows the contest tightening a bit in New York state, though Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton still leads Republican Donald Trump by double digits.

Siena College spokesman Steve Greenberg says while Clinton is still 17 points ahead of Trump in New York state, she’s lost ground in the past few weeks among independents.

He says Clinton and Trump are now tied among independents in the downstate suburbs.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Hillary Clinton’s widening lead over Donald Trump is likely to affect downballot races for Congress, where there are several contested seats, and for control of the state Senate in New York, where Republicans are barely clinging to the majority.

As recently as the summer, when the presidential candidates were tied in the polls, leading New York Republicans predicted that the state would be in play for Trump — and that he could even help get downballot GOP candidates for Congress and the state Legislature elected.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

With less than three weeks before Election Day, Hillary Clinton is even further ahead of Donald Trump in New York state, and that could affect downballot races, including seats for the state Senate.

Clinton is 24 points ahead of Trump, at 54 percent to 30 percent, a jump from when Siena College did a survey in September. Spokesman Steve Greenberg said the biggest change is independents moving over to the Democratic presidential candidate’s camp. A two-point lead among independents for Clinton has grown to a 17-point lead.

Meg Kelly / NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate tonight at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact checking from NPR reporters and editors.

Follow along on-air; the debate airs live starting at 9 p.m., uninterrupted. You can also tune in for the pre-debate call in show at 8 p.m. on WRVO.

Tune in for the latest in the Intelligence Squared U.S. series, this time examining the "Trump phenomenon" and the forthcoming election.

The elites of both parties have expressed contempt for Donald Trump, and Trump has succeeded in part by channeling his voters' contempt for the elites. Does support for Trump reflect an uninformed populism and misplaced anger by a large swatch of the American electorate? Or have the elites failed to empathize with their struggles, and failed to craft effective policies to help them cope?

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The discord over the presidential election continues to filter down into a race for Congress in central New York. The question of whether freshman Republican Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) would support Donald Trump continues to dog the campaign for the 24th Congressional District.

The questions started coming this spring: would Katko, trying to win re-election in a district rated as a toss-up, support Trump, a controversial nominee.

New York State Senate

Democrats in New York are trying to keep the heat on Republicans running for office over the coarse remarks made by GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump in a leaked video.

Every day since Friday’s release of the tape — where Donald Trump disparages women in a crude manner — Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, has slammed Trump. And he’s urged New York Republicans to disassociate themselves from the top of their ticket.

“They should stand up and say, ‘I’m a Republican, but I’m a New Yorker first,’” Cuomo said. “‘And we’ll have nothing to do with the degradation of women.’”

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is keeping the heat on New York Republicans to disown Donald Trump after the GOP presidential candidate’s coarse remarks about women revealed in a video over the weekend.

Cuomo said he does not think Trump turned around his troubled candidacy in Sunday night’s debate performance and, for the third day in arrow, called on New York Republicans to reject their party’s presidential nominee.

“They should stand up and say ‘I’m a Republican, but I’m a New Yorker first,’” Cuomo said. “‘And we’ll have nothing to do with the degradation of women.'”

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is one of many Democrats condemning Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for his newly-released statements in 2005, where he spoke of women in vulgar terms, and described actions that many view as sexual assault.

“This was a disrespectful, sexist, derogatory statement about all women, and it should be condemned,” Cuomo said, speaking after a briefing on an accident on the Long Island Railroad Sunday.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican Rep. John Katko said he will not be voting for his party’s presidential candidate, Donald Trump, after sexually aggressive comments Trump made about women in 2005 were leaked.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate tonight at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact checking from NPR reporters and editors.

Pulitzer-Prize winning investigative reporter David Cay Johnston has been following Donald Trump’s business career for decades.  So when Trump launched his campaign for president, he collected all his files and wrote The Making of Donald Trump.  This week on the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher discusses the book with Johnston, and explores how his past business experiences might inform his behavi

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate tonight at 9 p.m.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

NPR News is providing live coverage of all three Presidential debates and one Vice Presidential debate this fall. Special coverage begins at 9 p.m. each night on WRVO, without any interruption. Following the debate, NPR's Robert Siegel and reporters will provide analysis and fact-checking.

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A new poll shows that Hillary Clinton is still far ahead of Donald Trump among New York voters — but she has some weak points.

Clinton holds a 21-point lead over Trump among likely New York voters in the Siena College poll, down from a 25-point lead one month ago.

But Clinton has some weaknesses. She is viewed unfavorably by just over half of voters and does not have much support beyond registered Democrats, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

With a little less than two months before election day, Onondaga County’s Republican Party is hoping to move forward with a united front. A potential challenger to Chair Tom Dadey’s leadership was brought into the fold after a weekend of intense discussions.

This NPR News special will examine the characters of both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. The 2016 Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are the most unpopular candidates since modern polling began. But why is that the case?

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

New York state’s Republican Party chairman is talking up Donald Trump and predicted that the GOP presidential candidate will do well in New York state.

Ed Cox said Trump has been looking presidential lately, appearing in Mexico alongside that country’s president, and visiting flood-ravaged Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Cox said Trump’s strength is that he’s a “self-made politician.”

“And a genius of a politician, you have to admit,” Cox said.

New York State Senate

There’s more evidence that the presidential race may affect which party will control the state Senate.

Currently, the GOP is holding on, with the help of one Democrat who meets with them.

But a new Siena College poll finds that nearly two-thirds of voters think that Donald Trump at the top of the ticket will not help Republicans hold on to the Senate, and Hillary Clinton as the Democratic candidate will actually help Democrats regain the Senate, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

A new poll that finds Donald Trump badly trailing Hillary Clinton in the presidential race in New York could be good news for Democrats in the state Senate.

Trump’s supporters in New York had hoped that the state could be in play for the Queens native. But the latest poll from Siena College finds that Clinton, who has adopted New York as her home, is ahead of Trump by 30 points — 57 percent to 27 percent — in a two-way race.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) still hasn’t publicly endorsed Republican Donald Trump for president, and state party officials aren’t too happy about it. Katko is running for reelection in a congressional district that has changed parties for the last five election cycles, and has expressed concern over Trump’s tone and divisive rhetoric, saying Trump will have to earn his vote. New York State Republican Party Chair Ed Cox says he understands Katko’s reluctance.

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