Donald Trump

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

With less than three weeks before Election Day, Hillary Clinton is even further ahead of Donald Trump in New York state, and that could affect downballot races, including seats for the state Senate.

Clinton is 24 points ahead of Trump, at 54 percent to 30 percent, a jump from when Siena College did a survey in September. Spokesman Steve Greenberg said the biggest change is independents moving over to the Democratic presidential candidate’s camp. A two-point lead among independents for Clinton has grown to a 17-point lead.

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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate tonight at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact checking from NPR reporters and editors.

Follow along on-air; the debate airs live starting at 9 p.m., uninterrupted. You can also tune in for the pre-debate call in show at 8 p.m. on WRVO.

Tune in for the latest in the Intelligence Squared U.S. series, this time examining the "Trump phenomenon" and the forthcoming election.

The elites of both parties have expressed contempt for Donald Trump, and Trump has succeeded in part by channeling his voters' contempt for the elites. Does support for Trump reflect an uninformed populism and misplaced anger by a large swatch of the American electorate? Or have the elites failed to empathize with their struggles, and failed to craft effective policies to help them cope?

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The discord over the presidential election continues to filter down into a race for Congress in central New York. The question of whether freshman Republican Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) would support Donald Trump continues to dog the campaign for the 24th Congressional District.

The questions started coming this spring: would Katko, trying to win re-election in a district rated as a toss-up, support Trump, a controversial nominee.

New York State Senate

Democrats in New York are trying to keep the heat on Republicans running for office over the coarse remarks made by GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump in a leaked video.

Every day since Friday’s release of the tape — where Donald Trump disparages women in a crude manner — Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, has slammed Trump. And he’s urged New York Republicans to disassociate themselves from the top of their ticket.

“They should stand up and say, ‘I’m a Republican, but I’m a New Yorker first,’” Cuomo said. “‘And we’ll have nothing to do with the degradation of women.’”

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is keeping the heat on New York Republicans to disown Donald Trump after the GOP presidential candidate’s coarse remarks about women revealed in a video over the weekend.

Cuomo said he does not think Trump turned around his troubled candidacy in Sunday night’s debate performance and, for the third day in arrow, called on New York Republicans to reject their party’s presidential nominee.

“They should stand up and say ‘I’m a Republican, but I’m a New Yorker first,’” Cuomo said. “‘And we’ll have nothing to do with the degradation of women.'”

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is one of many Democrats condemning Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for his newly-released statements in 2005, where he spoke of women in vulgar terms, and described actions that many view as sexual assault.

“This was a disrespectful, sexist, derogatory statement about all women, and it should be condemned,” Cuomo said, speaking after a briefing on an accident on the Long Island Railroad Sunday.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Republican Rep. John Katko said he will not be voting for his party’s presidential candidate, Donald Trump, after sexually aggressive comments Trump made about women in 2005 were leaked.

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate tonight at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact checking from NPR reporters and editors.

Pulitzer-Prize winning investigative reporter David Cay Johnston has been following Donald Trump’s business career for decades.  So when Trump launched his campaign for president, he collected all his files and wrote The Making of Donald Trump.  This week on the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher discusses the book with Johnston, and explores how his past business experiences might inform his behavi

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate tonight at 9 p.m.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

NPR News is providing live coverage of all three Presidential debates and one Vice Presidential debate this fall. Special coverage begins at 9 p.m. each night on WRVO, without any interruption. Following the debate, NPR's Robert Siegel and reporters will provide analysis and fact-checking.

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A new poll shows that Hillary Clinton is still far ahead of Donald Trump among New York voters — but she has some weak points.

Clinton holds a 21-point lead over Trump among likely New York voters in the Siena College poll, down from a 25-point lead one month ago.

But Clinton has some weaknesses. She is viewed unfavorably by just over half of voters and does not have much support beyond registered Democrats, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

With a little less than two months before election day, Onondaga County’s Republican Party is hoping to move forward with a united front. A potential challenger to Chair Tom Dadey’s leadership was brought into the fold after a weekend of intense discussions.

This NPR News special will examine the characters of both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. The 2016 Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are the most unpopular candidates since modern polling began. But why is that the case?

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

New York state’s Republican Party chairman is talking up Donald Trump and predicted that the GOP presidential candidate will do well in New York state.

Ed Cox said Trump has been looking presidential lately, appearing in Mexico alongside that country’s president, and visiting flood-ravaged Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Cox said Trump’s strength is that he’s a “self-made politician.”

“And a genius of a politician, you have to admit,” Cox said.

New York State Senate

There’s more evidence that the presidential race may affect which party will control the state Senate.

Currently, the GOP is holding on, with the help of one Democrat who meets with them.

But a new Siena College poll finds that nearly two-thirds of voters think that Donald Trump at the top of the ticket will not help Republicans hold on to the Senate, and Hillary Clinton as the Democratic candidate will actually help Democrats regain the Senate, said Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

A new poll that finds Donald Trump badly trailing Hillary Clinton in the presidential race in New York could be good news for Democrats in the state Senate.

Trump’s supporters in New York had hoped that the state could be in play for the Queens native. But the latest poll from Siena College finds that Clinton, who has adopted New York as her home, is ahead of Trump by 30 points — 57 percent to 27 percent — in a two-way race.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) still hasn’t publicly endorsed Republican Donald Trump for president, and state party officials aren’t too happy about it. Katko is running for reelection in a congressional district that has changed parties for the last five election cycles, and has expressed concern over Trump’s tone and divisive rhetoric, saying Trump will have to earn his vote. New York State Republican Party Chair Ed Cox says he understands Katko’s reluctance.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Republican Party has opened up a political headquarters for the Donald Trump presidential campaign in Syracuse. Elected officials, volunteers and Donald Trump fans crowded into an Erie Boulevard office space to get a pep talk from state Republican Party Chairman Ed Cox as the area’s Trump headquarters officially opened on Friday.

"The momentum is on our side, the big mo. And by the way, what does that mean? Come November 8, we’re going to have a Republican President of the United States, Donald Trump,” Cox said. “And that’s what it’s all about.”

Julia Botero / WRVO News

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-Willsboro) visited New York Air Brake in Watertown Friday on a campaign stop. She spoke about how the Import-Export bank helps U.S. manufacturers compete internationally. Stefanik helped reform the bank.

“When American workers are able to compete on a level playing field there is no other country that is manufacturing the highest quality of products that the U.S. is,” said Stefanik.  

After her brief speech, the question and answer period turned to the presidential campaign.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

Republicans in central New York are still angry with Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) and his decision to back Democrat Hillary Clinton instead of Republican Donald Trump in the race for president.  

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) added his voice to a chorus of criticism regarding Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s comments to the Muslim parents of an Army captain killed in Iraq.

“We ought to revere our Gold Star mothers,” Schumer said. “We ought to praise them. We are to not be criticizing them. My heart goes out to these people who made the ultimate sacrifice and criticism of them is very, very wrong.”

WRVO News File Photo

Democratic congressional candidate Colleen Deacon is calling out her Republican opponent, Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus), for not criticizing Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump over comments he made about Gold Star parents of a U.S. Army captain killed in Iraq in 2004.

During the Democratic National Convention, Khizr Khan, father of Capt. Humayun Khan, talked about the loss of his son in Iraq. Trump tweeted several apparent criticisms of Khan and his wife, and the public feud has continued for nearly a week. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News (file photo)

Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) Tuesday became the first Republican member of Congress to say he will vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton for president in November. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

New York’s delegates have high hopes for their nominee Donald Trump’s speech tonight, but some also want him to tone down some of his rhetoric and act more presidential.

State GOP Chair Ed Cox said a “great acceptance speech” will help to unite the party and fire everyone up for November. He defined that as something more serious than the sometimes rambling addresses that are very popular at Trump rallies.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Among the many Republican public officials sitting out of this week's GOP national convention is central New York Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld). The moderate congressman reiterated that he does not support nor will he vote for the GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

"A lot of people are just looking for an outlet to react to their -- I think rightful -- disdain, disgust with government," Hanna said. "But electing someone who's not competent to do the job is the opposite of what I think people should be doing."

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

New York’s delegation at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland heard from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich at their breakfast meeting Monday. Gingrich offered them a game plan for winning in New York state in November.

Former House Speaker, professor and now author of dystopic thrillers, Newt Gingrich spoke as an official Donald Trump surrogate. He offered the delegates what he called a game plan to win typically Democratic New York state away from Hillary Clinton in the presidential race. He says the political landscape is rapidly shifting, and New York City is key.

Karen DeWitt

Capitol Correspondent Karen DeWitt is reporting from the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio this week. DeWitt, along with regular contributors to New York Now, will be bringing us podcasts from the road featuring members of each party.

Karen DeWitt

The Republican National Convention begins in Cleveland Monday. New York state Republicans will hear from former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker, who are billed as official Trump-Pence surrogates, as well as CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow.

Republican State Party Chair Ed Cox says he doesn’t think the delegates need a lot of convincing, though he admits that many of them initially supported others in what was originally a 16-candidate race.